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3

I've shot 4k footage since 2014, and when mastering in 1080p, I often use digital zoom in post. There are multiple factors I would look at. Cameras that use a single sensor will display debeyering artefacts when examining the direct pixel readout (mushier detail and reduced colour information). This issue is nicely improved when downsampling 4k to 1080p, ...


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I have that camera. Here are a few things to consider: The camera doesn't have any in-body stabilization, so the footage can be very shaky unless you're prepared. In my situation, I knew I wanted to use a gimbal to stabilize. This works great, but it will affect your lens choice. If you plan to use the BMPCC on a gimball ever, remember that you won't ...


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For most people, the first workhorse lens will be a zoom, because of the versatility. Sharpness in lenses isn't a huge factor for video; at HD resolution and below, lenses that photographers turn their noses up at for their sharpness do a perfectly adequate job. Once you're shooting 4k it starts being a bit more important, but even still that's way below ...


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Yes, well not for zooming but for maximizing and restoring the panel. These shortcuts may look different depending on the keyboard layout. On English layouts it's ` for the active frame, which is the frame with the thin blue border drawn around, and Shift+` for the frame under the cursor. The ` character is called acute or backtick. If you use another ...


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pzoom is the calculated zoom value for the previous frame. It is initialized to 1 at the start of filtering. So, if total no. of frames is X, your zoom expr should be z='min(pzoom+(2.13-1)/X,2.13)'


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Use a TRS cable. Make sure you reduce the line-out level in your Zoom H5, otherwise the audio in your camera will peak all the time. The quality/purity of the copper in the cable is irrevelant. This OFC vs. OCC is just marketing-blah-blah. Apparently no manufacturer has been able to prove any discernible difference. A real problem is that these 3.5mm jacks ...


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For videography you do not necessarily look for "a good" lens for pixel peeping, you want a good autofocus system and a wide aperture for a "cinematic look". This depends on what type of videography you are doing. Interviews, documental, landscape, indoors, outdoors, using a tripod, using a handheld. Jason Conrad's answer is interesting because he is using ...


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Use ffmpeg -i file.mp4 -i image.jpg -filter_complex "[1:v]pad=iw*2:ih*2:(ow-iw)/2:(oh-ih)/2:c=black@0,zoompan='1+on/125':x='(iw-iw/zoom)/2':y='(ih-ih/zoom)/2':d=125:s=WxH,format=gbrap,fade=t=in:d=5:alpha=true:st=0[im];[0:v][im] overlay=x=10:y=10:enable='between(t,0,5)'" out.mp4 The image is padded to double width and height with the padding colour being ...


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Directional Blur is a feature of the VSE (video sequence editor), aka compositor. When you open up Blender, select Video Editing as the Screen Layout. Make one window a Node Editor (where you will introduce your directional blur node), and choose the Compositing view. Open another window as a Video Sequence Editor (where you will put your clips) and view ...


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That's very easy. Simply select all images, press right click -> Nest. Give it a name and you are done. Now on this single "clip" apply your movement. If you want to edit the single images, double click the new clip.


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There's a few ways to do this. The simplest is to make the castle layer the parent of the magnifying glass (use the parent drop-down or the pick whip), so that as you scale the castle up the magnifying glass scales up as well. This will let you move the magnifying glass independently, because child layers inherit the parent's transformation, but not vice-...


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