7

What you are talking about is upscaling and any current HDTV will do upscaling automatically. Upscaling doesn't work miracles though, it will only make it so that the lower quality signal can be watched on a higher quality display. It just multiplies the pixels so that a 720 by 480 (.9 pixel compressed) signal for example doesn't end up only taking up 1/4 ...


7

It depends on the camera. Digital sensors such as those used in DSLRs produce heat as they capture images. The main issue with extended video capture is the accumulation of heat in the sensor. If it gets hot enough, it is possible that either a) quality can be reduced temporarily due to increased noise or b) at the extreme end, damage to the sensor could ...


5

For a server, you definitely want ffmpeg. I would also strongly recommend compiling it yourself (those are Ubuntu instructions, but should work for Debian as well AFAIK) - the best AAC encoder available for ffmpeg (libfdk_aac) cannot be redistributed alongside x264 (because of the GPL), and the version of ffmpeg in the repositories is probably too old for ...


5

With the Sony alpha 5000 camera specifically, you will run into trouble trying to do continuous video capture (10 hours or more). It will stop recording after 29min and 50seconds and then you will have to start it recording again. Update: Per @John this only applies to actual recording. If you plugin the HDMI out to a video capture device, you can stream ...


4

Firewire is better for video, because firewire is a more sophisticated interface. Firewire provides for device to device communication, DMA transfers and other performance features that USB does not. Therefore Firewire does not rely on the host computer's CPU. USB does not provide DMA transfers. All data on the USB bus must be managed by the CPU loading it ...


4

For the best quality and/or High Definition you want to use the fastest computer input you have that your streaming app will accept. That would normally be Firewire. Most online streaming sites will accept both USB or Firewire. Take a look at http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDxTalks/search?query=tedxsanantonio+2011. These are TEDx Talks we shot using a SONY ...


4

The cabling is likely your problem. The composite cables you're using (red, yellow, white) will only move analog signal from the set top box to the TV. Likewise with RG59 or RG6 (coaxial). While both varieties of cables there are technically capable of passing digital signals (they don't care... they're just dumb cables), set top boxes typically only ...


4

Unfortunately there is no perfect or exact answer. Your question topic mentions HD-SDI, which is a digital signal. Those tends to degrade 'cliff-wise', unlike analog signals where degradation is gradual. It will partly depend on the quality of the receiving device -- whether or not, or how well, it can capture the signal as the eye pattern turns to mush. ...


4

TL;DR : Nothing simple. Both solutions use a relay, and it's not suitable for real production. Actually, you only have two possibilities, and both are ugly. There is absolutely no open-source software capable to handle a non permanent stream (gstreamer+forks, ffmpeg, vlc, mplayer). Every single one of them have the same behavior : last frame still visible, ...


4

The minimum software is hardware. You want specialized hardware for doing top quality live streaming encoding reliably. You could use something like the Black Magic ATEM television studio which includes 4 inputs and real time stream encoding capability to produce the conference really well or could use a cheaper stream encoder device that simply produces a ...


4

If the frame-rate is not too high and you can associate a frame with a precise timestamp then the easiest would be to add the metadata as textual subtitles. The other option is to mux the metadata as standard headers in .mp4 or similar container format. .mp4 can be broken down into multiple fragments, each one with its own header, and theoretically this can ...


4

Unfortunately, no, that's the entire reason DRM exists. It is a bit like trying to prevent someone from recording an on-air broadcast. When you send video data over the internet to someone's player, they can simply store the information being sent to the player unless you obfuscate it and make it so that the player will only work under certain ...


4

I would get as far away from EE as possible. Using the x264 tool, and mp4box, you can convert and segment out the files which are ready to be streamed to any dash compatible players. Especially since you mentioned using batch scripts, this is a great solution I think. This is a good guide: http://www.dash-player.com/blog/2014/11/mpeg-dash-content-generation-...


4

I've worked through a similar project over the last 6 months, and performed more tests than I can keep track of now. So this is a little fresh for me. With your questions: 4K camera -> capture card -> Linux PC (compression) -> RTSP This will work well Are blackmagic ursa mini 4K and decklink card able to do the first 2 stages respectively? Yes ...


4

"Q: Is it better to have more B-frames or more P-frame for video streaming?". From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_compression_picture_types The three major picture types used in the different video algorithms are I, P and B. They are different in the following characteristics: I‑frames are the least compressible but don't require other video ...


4

To determine if a channel has SCTE-35, you will need to have the Program Map Table (PMT) recorded. From the PMT, you should be able to find the Packet Identifiers (PIDs) of all of the streams associated with the channel you are interested in. There will be a PID for the video and at least one audio PID. If SCTE-35 is present, there will be at least one PID ...


4

You can use FFmpeg as an RTMP server as following ffmpeg -f flv -listen 1 -i rtmp://localhost:1935/live/app -c copy rtsp://YOUR_RTSP_HOST Notes: -listen 1 makes FFmpeg act as a RTMP server when used with RTMP protocol Use rtmp://localhost:1935/live/app as the RTMP server url on the source You can set any playpath rtmp://localhost:1935/any/thing and any ...


3

Your comparison of WMV to MP4 is a little bit confusing, because you're comparing apples and oranges. MP4 is a container format, which may contain a variety of audio and video formats. Most commonly, an MP4 file will contain wither an MPEG-4 Part 10 (aka H.264) or MPEG-4 Part 2 video stream, although it can contain MPEG-2 or MPEG-1 video streams. There ...


3

EasyCap 2.0 DC60+ is what I use, and they work great. Make sure you get the DC60+ version, you don't want the older versions. There are a lot of knock-offs floating around--I'd stick with the official one. There's also a good compilation of capture cards on this thread on the Wirecast Forum.


3

I'm pretty sure you can use vlc to both stream and restream it. I use vlc to stream all my tv channels to all my devices(rtsp, mp4, html5). Search for vlc media player streaming like https://www.videolan.org/doc/streaming-howto/en/ch04.html


3

It varies a little from one server to another, but the basic components are an encoder/streaming client on the local client that takes input from the camera and turns it in to a stream that can be sent to the stream server on the VPS. The job of the stream server (such as Red5) is then to provide a publishing point that relays the stream to viewers. The ...


3

Does youtube store different video files for different bit rate? Yes is the technique called "resampling" ? No Does youtube make live resampling for every user ? No All this things happens live ? No, not on youtube. But Yes on twitch.tv Or it encode and save different video files for different bitrate, so that when a user changes bitrate it ...


3

So it turns out after a lot of research that this is the desired behaviour for Apple's AVPlayer component. Basically, my Internet is so slow here where I live, the component waits until the video has fully downloaded before it starts playing. The best and recommended way around this, is to generate alternate streams for the video before trying to play it. ...


3

The obligatory ffmpeg answer (not a very good one, other answers still needed): You could feed your video through ffmpeg -vf drawtext=textfile=onscreen.txt:reload=1 With whatever other drawtext options you need to put your text where you want it, with the font you want. reload=1 makes it check the text file for changes every frame, but doesn't give you a ...


3

The answer is yes, video can be composited fast enough to be streamed live. The tool that does this is called a switcher. Typically a switcher introduces a single frame delay from input to composited output. By connecting the output to a streaming encoder, you can stream out your live, composited video. For an example, see the Blackmagic Design ATEM ...


3

You have two choices... The wireless way: SJ4000 WiFi has a built-in RTSP streaming server, supporting one client at a time with a limited resolution at 640x360. This can be viewed locally by connecting your phone or laptop to the camera's access point, start a RTSP+H.264-capable media player (e.g. VLC Media Player), and instruct it to open following URL: ...


3

FFmpeg, by default, uses ffserver's conf file to set encoding parameters. Add -override_ffserver to the ffmpeg command to prevent that.


3

This would be possible using OBS's BrowserSource. First, find the embed code for the stream (in YouTube you can click "Share" and then "Embed"). Find the src="" and copy the URL that's inside the quotes. In OBS, create a new Browser. Paste the previously copied URL into the URL field, and set the Width and Height to your canvas size (or your preferred size)....


2

Wowza Media Server on Amazon EC2 is a really cost-effective way to do it, it's very popular among churches because of its on-demand nature and low cost. You spin up the server when you need it, pay a small hourly charge for it, pay for the bandwidth used, and shut it down.


2

Blackmagic and Livestream are your friends :) You probably want to get 3 cameras - one for the priest, one for roaming action shots and one for the audience. You'll need a whole bunch of microphones and an audio mixer. But you probably already know all this. Buy a Blackmagic TV Studio and buy a Livestream Broadcaster - plug the TV Studio's HDMI output into ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible