Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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7

A graphic like this would have most likely been made using Adobe After Effects. The style of this graphic is a mix of Kinetic Typography and Infographics. Googling around you can find tutorials on creating infographics and kinetic typographic videos. Though as a warning, generally creating a video like this takes a number of days for an experienced user.


7

If you have a frame where the person does not exist, you can use a tool called a difference matte. (You'll need to scroll down to the section titled "Difference Matte Effect" for a description.) It will find a difference between the frame without the person, and the frames with a person and remove areas that are the same, leaving only the difference (in this ...


6

There is a much better way to do that. That example video is a pretty poor illusion. It can be done "for real" with with real light. But it looks different. It has to be dark. You can use motion tracking to create an animation path. You can also use manual key frames. There are lots of tutes on the intertubes about that. Here is one:


6

It's called a dolly zoom, and you achieve it by moving the camera towards your subject and zooming out at the same time (or moving away and zooming in).


6

This is likely the result of using an anamorphic lens: http://www.red.com/learn/red-101/anamorphic-lenses From the page: Standard Bokeh Anamorphic Bokeh


6

In general you can't create visual effects within a single application, because there are too many different departments like: Match moving Keying / Rotoscoping Modeling Texturing Animation Simulation Lighting / Rendering Compositing Some of them are more artistic and other very technical tasks. For every task there are 2+ specific applications to solve ...


5

It really depends on how much you care about realtime operation. VSTs tend to be used both for production and performance, but with video, because there's so much more processing involved, things tend to be split between production and performance. That being said, for production, After Effects plugins are probably the closest analogy. For performance, ...


5

The easiest bet is to actually draw on a piece of glass and there are actually boards made for just that purpose for the classroom. It is probable one of those is being used here and the video reversed to make it readable from the other side. This seems likely as the video shows the guy left handed and the buttons are on the wrong side of his shirt. The ...


5

Any workflow that works for you is "correct". I don't see any obvious problems with your proposed workflow, though I would think you would want to do sound after VFX so that it can be properly timed to the VFX. Depending on the software you are using, you may not have to lock the shots but may actually be able to move directly in to working on the shots. ...


5

Looks like text moving to a "Motion Tracking" effect. Basically it finds and follows 1 or more points in a picture then moves the text accordingly. If you use 2 or more points you can track the 3d angle also. Examples: 2D position only 3D position, scale and angle


5

There are so many interesting ways to do this. One of the easiest ways (in-camera, no post production work) is to use a piece of glass. Film Riot did a tutorial on it, they explain it best, see below: Or you could go with a bit of post production work, after effects being my go to tool that I use. Add a background video ...


5

This is called stroboscopic effect. It refers to when the sample rate is synchronized or very slightly out of sync resulting in a much slower representation of the motion that results from taking a picture that is at the same point or slightly advanced point in a subsequent cycle of a higher frequency cyclic motion. You can actually do the same exact thing ...


5

When you shoot from further away you use a "longer" lens, in other words a lens with a longer focal length. This has a few effects, that you'll have to fake to make it look real. First, the perspective tends to get flattened with long lenses. You've probably seen this in the classic cinema trope of a long shot of a crowd walking along a footpath, where ...


5

Final Cut Pro X has a plugin called Pro Removal that can remove moving things from the scene on fixed camera shots. Also there is a tutorial for After Effects that shows how remove objects from scene using the tracker. Also you can clean frame by frame using Photoshop or similar if you have a good amount of time to spend or a crew to help you in the task.


4

One solution to the jerkiness of stop-motion animation was developed for some Star Wars sequences, termed "Go Motion". Basically the idea is that you leave the shutter open a little longer than necessary, and move the objects a bit, to create some motion blur.


4

Blender, which is free and open-source, can do difference matte keying. I don't know if it's better or worse than After Effects' keyer because I haven't used it before.


4

Every decent video editor has built-in filters (like Color Correction, Film Effects, TV simulator, Color Curves, etc.) that can be used to achieve the desired 'look'. There are plug-ins and tools that contain many ready-to-use presets, such as: Magic Bullet Looks Film Looks SVP Adobe SpeedGrade DaVinci Resolve etc.


4

This is certainly more work, but if you want a truly authentic and "organic" VHS look: Go find a used VHS recorder (or two) at a thrift store (you might have one sitting around your house!) Get some blank VHS tapes at a Walgreens (they still sell it) lay off your video onto VHS tape (for extra authenticity, copy it again to a second recorder and repeat as ...


4

I think you're referring to the (false) parallax effect. This guy has applied it to stationary photographs in a similar way as in the "God made a farmer" video and in the video description he explains the global steps he has taken. Here's a quote from his description concerning the production process: First, the image is cut into multiple sections, each ...


4

While you often see compression in the effects section of editing software, it is dynamics rather than actual effects. In the traditional sense in the live world, compression is not considered an effect. The software world simply does it that way because they are all software filters, but even then they are often in a dynamics category. Compression, ...


4

A coworker has just turned me on to using Warp Stabilizer. It's a built-in effect in Adobe Premiere CS6. Before using this tool, I also used After Effects to smooth and stabilize motion. The difference is outstanding. Warp Stabilizer has worked faster, within my workflow, and more reliable than After Effects stabilization has. This has been huge for me. ...


4

If you ditch your plan to use moving shots you can do a simple background subtraction which will look a lot cleaner than greenscreen given this is a low cost production. This works by having a shot of your scene without any actor in it e.g. only the background and then film your scene with the actors without moving the camera, afterwards you can use a ...


4

It's the effect of using an anamorphic lens which squashes the image horizontally to fit a wide-screen image on conventional 35mm film. The image is then un-squashed by a similar lens on the projector when the film is screened (or by computer after the film is scanned in a digital post production environment). Bokeh appears elliptical because the front of ...


4

Yes, do it as one effect and use the graph editor to use a non-linear curve. You can alter the curve to respond however you'd like then. Simply click on the graph looking icon next to your parameter that you are keying on so that it will appear in the graph editor. Then open the graph editor (icon closest to the timeline on the top (looks like a graph). ...


4

There are several effects like this available today. If you're using Final Cut Pro X or Motion, you can use the BadTV filter. There are also 3rd party filters for a variety of platforms including DigiEffects' Damage filters. You could probably make your own by copying your input video, applying noise, maybe offsetting it, and then masking parts of the ...


4

To project a video instead of a photo: convert your video to an image sequence (with Nuke, AfterFX, Premiere, whatever...) load it into your file node, then click on 'Use Image Sequence' scroll in the timeline, and Maya will load the according frame


4

This is actually a collateral effect of the concept of rolling shutter. Most video devices do not expose all the frame area at once. They expose starting from one side and (up or down) and move from there. (The example has the camera rotated 90° so the effect is on the sides of the frame). This can be either a mechanical element that moves or rotates or an ...


3

I think you would like to take a look at this free online presentation editor: Prezi.com It might not give you results as "fancy" as in your provided video sample but you might be satisfied by it's simplicity of constructing your presentations in a dynamic way. Here is some presentation sample to check it out if still wondering before signing up.


3

The way most stage laser effects work is by using a holographic plate or diffraction grating which splits the single beam up into multiple beams. [image removed due to a DMCA request from copyright holder] These then pass to further holographic elements to provide shapes and lines, and these can then be manipulated further with lenses or mirrors.


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