7

Summary: Green screen work is not trivial, the quality largely depends on technique and good lighting, and at least enough space for doing the work you suggested. It does require software although iMovie bundled in most MACs has a chroma key effect (the software that allows you to composite your subject with whatever background you want including maps, other ...


7

You'd probably want to light it anyway, as it will make it easier to pull a key if it's properly lit. The farther you can keep it away from the objects or talent you'll be keying, the better. But light is essential to accurately capturing color, so if you can light it, you should. You want it to be evenly lit so that you don't have to choose too wide of a ...


5

I assume these are home made motion markers in order to track the motion of the head in the shot. This is useful for adding other objects (or images) to the object, therefore the technique is called object tracking. Note: The example given is only useful for 2d tracking, because most 3d solvers needs a minumium of 8 tracking markers around the object (in ...


5

There are a zillion greenscreen tutorials on YouTube. The basics are simple. 1.Pure green paint or fabric. 2.Even lighting on the green, good lighting technique on the subject. Avoid spills and shadows. 3.Use the highest quality camera, lenses and compression you have available -- but don't freak out unless you're using a lot of translucent objects like ...


5

You don't need to use greenscreen. You need to track markers, and put your footage above the markers and greenscren. Just lock position on markers points. Like in this video, but track not corners, but markers. Then you can add some effects for footage, to look more immersive.


5

Looking at your first example, I woul guess green screen, and not a particularly good one. It looks like they really need to increase the spill suppression, judging by the green spill evident on the feet of the bin. An alternative approach is to shoot in a studio with an infinite white cyc, for example something like this one (randomly selected from a ...


5

Well the 2nd is better. But the correct way is to light your Green Screen first, and you want to have it lit so it's a flat 70 IRE. You'll need a monitor with a Waveform option, and the waveform should pretty much be a flat and very thin line at 70 IRE. You can't do that visually (eyeballing). Then you place your talent so that they are separated as much ...


4

You don't say what you're using to edit these videos, but there may be a better chromakey plugin for your platform than what comes natively. Also, again depending on your platform, most editors will allow you to crop the key area (garbage matte) so that the green screen doesn't have to cover the entire raster, just enough to back the product you're ...


4

To reduce or eliminate the greenish reflection on the front of the table, you can buy some dark gray or black construction paper, or something equally non-reflective, cut it to size, and tape it over the 2 dark rectangles on the front of the table. I have 3 different solutions for the foot-shadows on the floor. You could point a semi-dim spotlight directly ...


4

Wattage has nothing to do with lumens, as different instruments provide a wide spectrum of output lumens based on lamp type. For instance, a 1.2K HMI ArriLite would put out more light than a 5000W tungsten lamp. LED, and flourescents are similar, higher output, less watts. What is critical for greenscreen work is that you use a monitor with a simple ...


3

With a good keyer it doesn't matter as much as it may have in the past, but in most cases green is the better choice. Which you choose depends more on where and with what content you do your keying. If you're using equal-band capture, recording and processing -- 4:4:4 for instance -- then it can be a tossup. But any encoding that limits chroma bandwidth -- 4:...


3

Assuming the lighting is solid, you should be in good shape. I haven't used the keying features of iMovie, but I can give you a few tips for After Effects. I'll defer to any power users of AE's keying functionality to chime in with more specific advice. First, you'll probably want to start with the Keylight plugin (from The Foundry). It should come bundled ...


3

The key to pulling a good key is a clean separation between key and subject. All things being equal, higher resolution will give a sharper edge between key and subject, which is good. But that's just one consideration. Chroma subsampling is another. Chroma recorded at full bandwidth (at least 10-bits and 4:4:4) will give a cleaner key than chroma ...


3

I really want to know how this gets automatically edited. The technique is called chroma key and consists of considering as transparent all pixels of the colors within a specified range. This is usually used with a bluescreen or a green background. The image is then simply layered over another background. As you have noticed, chroma key is not limited to ...


3

It doesnt really matter what type of lighting instruments you use, tungsten, hmi, led, flo, so long as you use the same color temperature lights to light the screen as you do to gauge the lighting of your scene and subjects. I do a lot of greenscreen work, and my best "short" advice: 1.) Get as big a screen as you can afford. And get your subjects as far ...


3

The best thing you can do is get as much right on set as possible. Cover cast, crew, and equipment with black fabric, hide them behind black curtains, Get your talent as far away from the green screen as far as you can while still maintaining its utility; choose your angles carefully, and keep the shots short, because whatever you do, you're going to have ...


2

If you have a Mac, download "Cam Twist." It offers reasonable live keying, and it can even put you as picture in picture. If you use the right browser, I.e. Firefox with the Google Hangouts plugin necessary for hangouts, "Camtwist" will just be an option in the list of cameras. Download it here.


2

Actually, your best bet is to use a PCIe or USB 3.0 HDMI input card, like a Blackmagic Intensity, which will take the clean HDMI output of many high quality cameras (e.g: a Nikon D600 or D800, a Canon C100 or C300, etc.) and make it available to other apps on your computer. This is what professional productions do for green screen work to ensure they're ...


2

Working at this level, your best bet is probably to use a DSLR and use one of the hacks available to use them as a webcam via USB. Consumer web-cams use a very small sensor which makes it virtually impossible to get any kind of meaningful background blur. You really need the large sensor of a DSLR to best accomplish what you are looking to do.


2

Practical or most effective? Green Screen work demands the following optimazation points to have it be effective. flat even lighting, no hot spots, no dark spots. no shadows, no reflections, the lighting has to be bight enough to register the green correctly, aka no noise. Additionally, to help avoid hot spots, plan on a fresh drywall/plasterboard for ...


2

Depends on what your definition of good green screen is. In terms of free software to do green screen well...Only one that I can even think of that does keying is Da Vinci Lite which is free from blackmagic's website. It is pretty complex and pro based, but with a little searching around you might find what you want. I am not sure if you can technically ...


2

Even a typical lamp with a "daylight"-colored bulb in it can act as a lighting source for your product. I'm sure your boss could spring for one light bulb! If you shoot again with the new lighting, or even without the new lighting, play around with the angle of your product / camera / stool to minimize the reflections.


2

I have a couple of suggestions that could be of help: 1) Use a polarizer to reduce reflections. You say your boss won't spring for anything else, but you can pick one up fairly cheaply (like under $20 on amazon). If that's really not an option, you can try using some polarized sunglasses in front of the lens, at least to see if it eliminates the reflections....


2

Yes, that is possible. What you're searching for is a difference matte / difference key. For that technique, you supply a base image and the program keys everything out that equals that image. So you could key out your static background so that only you remain in the picture. However, there are a few downsides: This technique doesn't work nearly as good as ...


2

There are several ways of achieving this. Use a hardware solution. They are available from Datavideo or on most video switchers. Obviously, these cost money and the results are dependant on how well you've lit your setup. For a software solution you will, like you've mentioned, need to connect your camera's video output to your computer. (It seems you ...


2

For static shots they shoot what's called a background plate: the same scene shot from the same angle but without the foreground action. Then where the green is taken out the empty background shows through. If the camera is moving this presents a problem. This can be solved by using motion control - basically a robot arm with the camera on it that can ...


2

DO NOT USE "AUTO". It is working against you. A nice, even video image of the green is needed. Setting your camera to "auto" just means that there is no single "formula" for which green to key out. USE BETTER LIGHT. it is not clear why you say "I think it is good enough", and then tell us that it is not good enough? We typically light the green screen ...


2

The technical name for this is a "bug". Usually the context is that it's an advertisement for another show on the same network, or it's a network logo rather than part of the content. I'm not very familiar with Windows software, but Shot Cut is free and includes compositing functions.


2

What you are thinking about is a very great way to save production costs and is used in many cases on many sets. Here is what your pipeline would look like: Shoot the footage with green tables Track the movement of the camera (using pfTrack preferably, but after effects can do the trick too) Importing the tracked movement into any 3D-software such as ...


1

With these kinds of things, I suggest not even using a green screen in the first place, especially one that is in an app and casts a green glow on the actors hands or body and picks up on reflections. Its much easier to have, instead, either a green piece of paper (which honestly will not really work in daylight in terms of the key but will at least give you ...


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