10

I work as an assistant editor on feature films, and use ffmpeg all the time, primarily for two purposes: Transcoding files to be uploaded for producers to view on digital dailies systems (Dax, PIX, etc). I've written up shell scripts that accept property-of and recipient strings as command line input, along with target bitrate, and then generate the desired ...


9

FFmpeg is probably being used more than you believe. I think the BBC uses it for some workflows, there is evidence that Laika and Weta may use it, and there is a fork called FFmbc which is targeted for professional broadcast usage. YouTube probably uses FFmpeg to decode as shown by some unique decoding issues (but this was several years ago that I read ...


8

FFmpeg's loudnorm filter can be used. Basic syntax is ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -c:v copy -af loudnorm=I=-23:LRA=1 -ar 48000 out.mp4 The loudness range (LRA) should be 2 x max deviation. Also see the ebur128 filter for measuring loudness.


5

Some Broadcasters require a Harding Test which is patented and proprietary, it creates a Certificate; thus getting someone to accept liability isn't going to be free. You can find a number of places online that will test a video file (or Game, Poster, Art, etc.) but those aren't free, the Harding website has authenticated tests and support. Free software ...


5

I wrote an ffmpeg filter which attempts to do this. It's not perfect, but it does seem to work well with a good part of the test samples I was working with. It has now been included into ffmpeg, and should be available in the next release. With mpv, you can enable it with: mpv video.mp4 --vf=photosensitivity The filter can be made more or less strict by ...


4

ABC, NBC, Comcast and others all have their own specs. What I've found is that 1080 progressive MP4 (h.264) at 29.97 fps (some rare cases need 59.94), with audio between 192-256 Kbps, usually does the trick. You'd obviously edit in ProRes, but to submit that codec to the stations is overkill. Some outlets will even reject specs that don't conform exactly to ...


4

The main reason is support, usability and control. First, lets clarify that FFMPEG is an encoder, QuickTime Pro is a video utility that happens to include multiple encoders and Final Cut Pro is a non-linear editor and has nothing to do with encoders other than the fact it can output to an encoder (generally QuickTime I believe). For big budget commercial ...


4

I use it in my professional production chain all the time. Last week I was using it to batch through dozens of videos that needed subtitles burnt-in. It would have taken me weeks of tedious labour with Final Cut, it took me a couple of minutes burning the srts in with ffmpeg, and I was able to automatically rename the files and compress them for the various ...


3

The obligatory ffmpeg answer (not a very good one, other answers still needed): You could feed your video through ffmpeg -vf drawtext=textfile=onscreen.txt:reload=1 With whatever other drawtext options you need to put your text where you want it, with the font you want. reload=1 makes it check the text file for changes every frame, but doesn't give you a ...


3

You can use an SDI Distribution Amplifier ("DA") (one SDI input, and two or more SDI outputs) for each camera so you can "duplicate" the camera video to send to both the production switcher and to your camera iso recorders. I use DAs I buy on Ebay. My current favorite is "AVUE 3G-SDI/HD-SDI/SDI 1 to 2 Repeater & distribution extender with re-clocking" ...


3

Getting a file format that works for everyone is very complicated. However, if you are are trying for network news, it is safe to use MPEG-2 TS 1080i29.97 (CBS, NBC, CNN) or 720p59.94 (ABC, Fox) at CBR 50Mbps, 15/3 closed GOP. Audio should be 48kHz PCM. Local stations will accept MP4s, but you likely won't be happy with the results once it gets to air. The ...


3

It varies a little from one server to another, but the basic components are an encoder/streaming client on the local client that takes input from the camera and turns it in to a stream that can be sent to the stream server on the VPS. The job of the stream server (such as Red5) is then to provide a publishing point that relays the stream to viewers. The ...


3

To legalize video with the Video Limiter: Set the Reduction Axis to Chroma and Luma. Set the Signal Minimum to 0% (=0 mV). Set the Signal Maximum to 103% (=700 mV + 3%). The rest of the settings may take some experimentation to find something that looks good for your project. I strongly recommend double checking you are within limits with a good gamut ...


3

The reason for mastering out to an uncompressed / minimally lossy format is so that you have a master copy, which you can then use to make other copies, without generation loss, or having to re-render. You don't have to use Animation. There, I've said it. While it's mathematically lossless, it's only 8-bit, so swings ± roundabouts. While I used to only ever ...


2

There's another free, more lightweight alternative to wowza and red5 - the nginx-rtmp-module, which frees you from messing around with java https://github.com/arut/nginx-rtmp-module/ and here's a guide to set it up with the free Open Broadcaster Software (which unfortunately is windows only) https://obsproject.com/forum/resources/how-to-set-up-your-own-...


2

Can't help with freeware, but i can shed some light on the professional side of things. At urgent.fm we use Zenon because most commercial stations in Belgium use it, and our station is one of the starting places for people interested into getting into radio work professionally in our region. That way someone who was trained at our station feels right at ...


2

Not sure about Windows, but for Ubuntu, you could always check out Rivendell. http://www.rivendellaudio.org/


2

There are three different things that get called "broadcast safe": Colors gamut: You don't need to apply an NTSC broadcast safe filter, but you do want to make sure that your colors are all within gamut for the format you are using. If you use out of gamut colors, most of the time nothing happens. However, you run the risk of some very odd, very hard to ...


2

Depends on who you ask. Old traditional people who grew up back in the bad old analog days have the Safe Action Area and Safe Title Area embedded in their brains. But even as old analog TV receivers evolved, there was less and less danger of losing the periphery of the frame to overscan. With modern LCD, LED, plasma, whatever, TV screens, there is ZERO ...


2

As per the Broadcast Engineer's Reference Book, p. 203 This correction will match DF time to real time to within approximately 2.6 frames per day; to eliminate the residual error the timecode generator can be reset each midnight. So, apparently nothing. As far as the "extra" frames, Charles Poynton says, If a timecode sequence is to be maintained ...


2

Webcams live in the universe of being devices plugged into computers, and switchers live in the universe of standard video sources being plugged into them. These two universes only talk to each other via specialized interfaces (if at all). Happily, there exists software that gives you switcher-like functionality as a software package for your computer. ...


2

I would suggest you research a bit further and then refine your question. To me it seems that there is a bit of confusion in terms of the software components needed for creating a livestream. First you need to have a software component that acquires a live video from some device. This video needs to be encoded. Once it is encoded it can be streamed by a ...


2

In general loudness correction is a two step process. (There's a little more to it for full EBU R128 compliance, but I work exclusively in the US and this all that is required for A/85 / CALM Act compliance.) Measure the long term/infinite loudness of the asset. Shift the level of the asset by the difference between the measured loudness and the target. ...


2

Unfortunately, I don't know of any free software that checks for PSE. As of 2013, the test for PSE was only available closed source. However, all of the major commercial QC tools can check for it. (You would need to check with each vendor if it is supported for all of the codecs you need to QC.) Interra Baton Tektronix Aurora Telestream Vidchecker Venera ...


2

As for how to work... it all depends on what your final destination is. Are you working on a piece to be broadcasted, or for the Web? In the latter case, the final product should be progressive. If the former... the in turn it depends on your source material, which seems to be interlaced. So you should: Create an interlaced project, "1080i50". The "50", in ...


2

Connection Speed For H.264 1080p30 streaming with typical compression (6 Mbps), I would recommend an Internet upload speed of around 10 Mbps minimum. Hardware OBS Studio suggests the following system requirements: AMD FX series or Intel i5 2000-series processor (dual or 4-core preferable) or higher. At least 4 GB of RAM (recommended, but not necessary). ...


2

V-Chip is encoded in the Extended Data Services (XDS) that is part EIA-608 captions. How it is actually transported in/with the video depends the signal type and medium. Analog: Encoded with the captions on line 21 field 2. SD SDI: Probably also on line 21 field 2. HD SDI: On line 9 of the HANC encoded as per SMPTE ST 334. ATSC over the air: In the DTVCC ...


1

Like @screaming-drills say's: this can be done with softwares like Wirecast and OBS. You could also get very expensive hardware to do the same eg. from Blackmagic Design, I would however look at the software option, with some inexpensive computers. Ex. Computer One One computer for camera input, depending on how the video is being delivered, I'd get ...


1

Investigate some of the software switcher products such as "V-Mix". Or some of the computer-based integrated products like NewTek "TriCaster". They will handle many more inputs than even the large (and expensive) hardware switchers like BMD ATEM, etc. The more expensive models likely handle quite a large number of PIP images to be combined. Of course, you ...


1

You can do this with OBS. I do it all the time. The Mac, can with OBS take the feed(s) and arrange/resize them and then stream it to Wirecast(?, but not necessary) or directly to Youtube. OBS handles both input from streams and from video cards, so you can have several inputs and combine them, very easily.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible