56

You can use ffmpeg to create video from audio using several filters. ahistogram Convert input audio to a video output, displaying the volume histogram. ffmpeg ffmpeg -i input.flac -filter_complex \ "[0:a]ahistogram,format=yuv420p[v]" \ -map "[v]" -map 0:a output.mp4 ffplay ffplay -f lavfi "amovie=input.flac, asplit [a][out1]; [a] ahistogram [out0]" ...


13

Kdenlive is rapidly becoming the most advanced Open Source video editor for Linux. As a Windows user, you can download a live CD of Kdenlive. Burn it to a CD, and then it will boot up into a Linux system for you. Or, you could install Virtual Box on Windows (again, free software) and then install the live CD to that. This would allow you to simultaneously ...


7

ffmpeg looks promising. Might be worth a shot. Specifically, the command ffmpeg -i video.mp4 -i audio.m4a -acodec copy -vcodec copy output.mp4 should do the trick.


6

In general you can't create visual effects within a single application, because there are too many different departments like: Match moving Keying / Rotoscoping Modeling Texturing Animation Simulation Lighting / Rendering Compositing Some of them are more artistic and other very technical tasks. For every task there are 2+ specific applications to solve ...


6

You have 10,000 videos that need to have a logo overlayed, subtitles burned in from srt files, and a standard copyright notice attached to the end. Then you need to make three different versions of each, at different sizes and codec settings. It's a quarter to five on Friday night. Option 1, you spend all weekend doing it in a GUI app, and you have no life. ...


5

If you're on Linux, consider Cinelerra: the most powerful video editor for Linux, Openshot: simple, powerful, and free video editor for Linux, or Kdenlive (also available for FreeBSD and Mac OSX): Free and open source video editor for GUN/Linux and FreeBSD Openshot and Kdenlive can be installed via apt-get install, however Cinelerra requires a little more ...


5

Avisynth (wiki) is a script-driven app and in conjunction with filters should be able to do the work.


5

FFmpeg (wiki) is one option; you can achieve what you want either with the subtitles filter (see also here) or the drawtext filter. The subtitles filter requires ffmpeg to be compiled with --enable-libass and drawtext requires it to be compiled with --enable-libfreetype. If you're on Linux, the former is fairly likely to be the case, though the latter may ...


5

Start here: 10 free video editors mirror. Keep in mind that free video editors are very simple and do not have many effects. I recommend you to buy inexpensive video editing software, like Sony Movie Studio or Cyberlink PowerDirector. Take a look at this list of consumer video editors mirror.


5

I tried kdenlive, so I'll post my findings about it as an answer. It didn't quite do the job, so I'm not going to mark this as the accepted solution. kdenlive easily imports my clips in mjpeg+pcm, and flac. And looks like it can export through ffmpeg, which is what I want. It has a feature to "set audio reference", and for other tracks, "align audio to ...


5

This question gets asked quite frequently, and normally the answer is to pick one from this list. But since you very clearly defined what you are looking for in the editing software, I think I can give you a better recommendation. Premiere Elements Personally, I use Creative Cloud software, which means Premiere Pro for video editing and After Effects for ...


4

I use both. Agree with all of the above for After Effects, I use it for any heavy lifting because Motion just drives you insane if you try anything too tricky with it. The beauty of Motion is the way it is integrated into FCP. So I tend to use it for things like lower thirds or credits, because I can create "Master Templates" in Motion and import them into ...


4

Sorry to say this, but DVD does and will not support HD videos - at least not with menu and other DVD features. HD-DVD didn't survive on the market - Blu-Ray did. The problem is that the amount of data necessary to create a HD image is higher that the bit-rate of DVD-Format. You can save various file formats on a DVD-ROM and some DVD players can play those ...


4

The production group you refer to has a team of 20 guys ("no girls") and 40 computers. Do you think there is an open source for 20 CGI professionals and 40 computers too? This is a very real production company with a budget to get things done. They have created enough attention to fund the project 'Iron Sky'. No easy task. What you are asking is like this, ...


4

MoviePy looks less intimidating than other scripting languages. It may be easier to script your time tag cutting tool with it. http://zulko.github.io/moviepy/


4

With a 99% chance After Effects was used here. As long as you plan on doing a commercial video I would avoid home video production programs like iMovie at all costs. Specially because iMovie is made for cutting video and not making animations. That's like making a commercial in Windows Movie Maker. There are many many talented freelancing After Effects ...


4

The default video files made by most Canon DSLRs is an H264 video file in an MOV container. Decoding high definition video at the data rates that most Canon cameras use is intensive for both memory, disk and CPU unless you have a dedicated decoder chip. Your iPod Touch uses flash storage (which is fast) and has H264 decoding capability to make it run ...


4

I think this is probably less of a question for video production people as much as it is for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) people. GIS Forum on Stack Exchange While you might be able to find an After Effects (AE) wizard who knows some scripting tricks to make this happen, my guess is more folks over in a GIS forum know how to do this in something ...


4

There are a lot of answers regarding open source on this answer: Good open source Video Editors? If you specifically target Linux I'd suggest Lightworks or Kdenlive. Lightworks isn't open source yet but is announced to be after the mac release is finished. Both a great option for video editing under Linux and fullfill your requirements. Lightworks has only ...


4

You could do this by making subtitles from your data streams and then either playing them back on a media player that can display subtitles, or rendering them into the video. Most subtitle formats are very simple ascii files — to demonstrate, here's an srt subtitle file: 1 00:00:01,046 --> 00:00:02,540 This is my home. 2 00:00:03,560 --> 00:00:05,...


4

First off there would be Lightworks, which is free with some limitations. It's a pure abomination and needs a lot of learning an rethinking if you're used to usual NLE software. Then, what most people don't think of, there would be Blender. Actually a 3D rendering software, but also a very good, free/open source video editor. Like all software, it has a ...


4

Virtualdub is very good software. Maybe it not cover all the requirements. And it's not exactly "visual" managed as the other, but it'd good and very flexible


4

With consumer targeted software, there is less of a standard of how to do things. For professional software, there are pretty standardized workflows that editors follow and so tools are pretty similar. For beginner software, while the basic concepts are still similar, the way in which they simplify them is not. The end results that are possible are still ...


4

For video editing the Hollywood standard is AVID, however smaller production houses and indie filmmakers tend to use Adobe Premiere. The nice thing about Premiere, in your case, is that it dynamic links with After Effects where you can do motion graphics, composting and basic visual effects such as green screen removal among other things. To explain these ...


4

ffmpeg, a free multi-platform command-line tool, can do this. Use the volumedetect and EBUR filters on each of the files ffmpeg -i input.mov -af volumedetect,ebur128 -f null - 2> input.log This will produce a log file with the initial lines looking like this: [Parsed_ebur128_1 @ 0000000002d42400] t: 12.7 M: -32.7 S: -32.7 I: -30.7 LUFS ...


4

DVD Video is limited to Standard Def, not High Def (HD). Blu-Ray overcomes that limitation. Alternatively you can use the DVD as a filesystem and play arbitrary media using a computer. But as a media container itself, the DVDs limits are very restricted.


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