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4

If you are starting from scratch with a m43 camera, then buying EF lenses kinda defeats the whole purpose of that format. First things first: the m43 is approximately 1/2 the image diagonal of a full-frame 35mm camera, which means lenses need to cover only 1/4 the area, and that means you can use 1/8th the glass to get the same job done. That translates to ...


4

ISO isn't magic. When you turn up the iso you're increasing the gain on an amplifier that is amplifying an analogue signal – the light hitting the sensor – and when you amplify a signal you amplify the noise. Remember that opening up a stop is a doubling the light intensity. To get ten stops of gain on a camera with native iso of, say 200, you'd have to go ...


4

The distortion you are seeing has nothing to do with ProTune or other codec settings. Its perspective distortion caused by the wide focal length of the GoPro Lens + The low quality of the GoPro Lens itself. When I say low quality, I mean that in relative terms. The GoPro lens actually produces a pretty amazing image for what it is. But even when you enable ...


3

Yes, you can do this successfully. I did it with an overhead 4K action camera with a fixed fisheye lens (YouTube video here). You'll want to remove the distortion in software to "square it up". Then you have some room to zoom in and pan. However, you effectively lose some resolution with the lens correction. You can only zoom in so far before it's ...


3

I've shot 4k footage since 2014, and when mastering in 1080p, I often use digital zoom in post. There are multiple factors I would look at. Cameras that use a single sensor will display debeyering artefacts when examining the direct pixel readout (mushier detail and reduced colour information). This issue is nicely improved when downsampling 4k to 1080p, ...


3

I just finished working with a company that has had several very successful Kickstarters. IMHO, lighting and audio are more important than camera type for this type of video, as long as you have a pro-sumer camera that shoots decent 1080p HD. Many successful campaigns have been shot on a DSLR with a stock lens. If you want to buy an additional lens then ...


3

There are a few important things to consider: Lighting is perhaps the most important aspect to creating a filmic image. A lot of filmmakers like to use natural light such as Innaritu on The Revenant. I remember from the BTS that they had maybe 2 hours a day for a week or so to film the 3 minute scene because he only wanted to use natural light. In the ...


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If you have your heart set on that particular lens, go for it! That's exactly what adapters are built for, after all. I have a Pentax 50mm F1.7 that I use with a K-Mount to EF-Mount adapter on my EOS 80D, and I love it. However, there are a couple of considerations. Image quality The image quality should be largely unaffected. However, the adapter you use ...


3

Yes, there is a lot you are missing. The 24-70 has substantially better transmittance (more light makes it through the lens), slightly better sharpness, significantly less chromatic aberration, 2 more diaphragm blades (better, more round bokeh), full time manual focus (can auto-focus at the start of a shot but still adjust after starting shooting). ...


3

It depends on what you mean by splashproof. Rain covers are the absolute cheapest form of protection (as little as $5 or as much as $70+), though they generally leave the front element exposed and provide only minimal protection since they are not sealed. They also are somewhat clunky to use as you generally have to reach under them or through sleeves in ...


2

You seem to have a serious misunderstanding of cinema lenses. Primes are almost always cheaper to cover the same range than zoom lenses. Comparing prime lenses that cost thousands of dollars a piece to a $1000 zoom lens is not a valid comparison. I have a $2400 Canon 24-70 f/2.8 II. It is the single best zoom lens Canon has ever made for under $50,000, ...


2

Typically recommended portrait lenses are around 85mm to 135m. These numbers refer to full frame cameras. Since you are using a m43 camera with a crop factor of 2x you should investigate lenses from 40mm to 70mm that fit your Panasonic


2

Ah yes, Canon lenses are a lot cheaper it seems than Sony lenses. With the A7s ii you an use both APS-C and FF (full frame) lenses. With an APS-C lens you have to enable APS-C mode in the camera and it will result in a crop, and in my experience, a slightly noticeable drop in quality/sharpness especially in low light. That being said, APS-C lenses shouldn't ...


2

Your calculations are right. But if you take a look here: https://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1279757/0 The vignette is much stronger. With the images provided by Aloicious I get a vignette.


1

If you use lens-protection of any kind, same with autocue or eyedirect, the additional glass in front of your camera will have some effect, yes. The magnitude of which will vary depending on your uses. Autocue glass usually has a slightly murky / milky look to it and the image might seem a little but soft upon close inspection - I assume the same will go for ...


1

Many lenses of different types have separate Macro modes that allow the photographer to focus on objects that are closer than they normally would be able to. Generally this Macro mode would apply if the object is within 1' of the lens. There are plenty of ways to work around this limitation creatively, and nicer and more expensive lenses may offer better ...


1

No one besides you can answer this question. A Cinema Prime Set pften constists out of a 18mm, 25mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm Primes (On Aps-C). It now depends on what you want to shoot. If you mainly shoot interior wides, the lens won't be of much use. But a 50mm f1.8 is often a great - cheap option to get into blurrier shoots.


1

It really depends on the capabilities of the focus system on the camera and the particular teleconverter and lens used. Since you mention action videos, I assume you will be dependent on autofocus. Not all teleconverters are able to properly communicate focal length and focus adjustment controls, so you'll need a "smart" teleconverter. Additionally, ...


1

A tough one. Certainly might be worth wording the client up that it's going to be dark. I'd try and do a test if possible to see exactly how dark it's going to be. I don't think you're going to get a much faster lens than ƒ/1.4 without dropping a truckload of money. There's a Canon 24-70 ƒ/2.8, it's AU$1750 so it's not small change, but would probably be ...


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Based on this illustration, you are able to compare the sensor sizes of red cameras with film formats like 16mm, 35mm or 70mm imax and so on.


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The AF subsystem is part of the camera. It is not affected by the lens. Face detection is also part of the camera. STM only affects the speed of focus for a lens (assuming that the camera feeds it with correct information.) So yes, STM lenses are better for video when coupled with a camera that has fast focus on its own. For your problem there are two ...


1

70mm to 100mm is the ideal portrait range. Although I prefer a farther throw many times simply for the look. Wider will distort, longer will compress. 20mm, that's wide- very for full frame or even a crop sensor. Are you sure of that?


1

Two things come to my mind: If you never operated or balanced a Glidecam before you will probably have a hard time. When using a Glidecam IS will not make such a big difference but nonetheless there will be one. So better have IS. I am assuming that you are using a DSLR like the Canon EOS 5D Mk III. Especially the 5D has quite good low light capabilities. ...


1

A common zoom range of Panasonic MFT lenses is 14-42(45)mm. As an owner of such a lens I found out it's quite a compromise for city videos. 14mm is wide, but often times not wide enough for buildings. 42mm is tele, but not enough for detail shots. Here are some with a more practical zoom range: Panasonic Lumix G Vario HD 14-140mm f/4.0-5.8 ASPH./MEGA O.I.S....


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Such devices do exist a reasonable amount of the time, but they rarely produce much in the way of quality. There are exceptions, but they are fairly rare. They do have their uses, but be aware that the results are most often marginal. Your best bet to find them is generally looking around the various smaller NY/NJ photo/video shops that carry a variety of ...


1

To use a DSLR for video, a lens is a requirement. A DSLR body is only a sensor and control circuitry, with absolutely nothing that will focus light on to the sensor. If you could even get it to record without a lens attached, you would simply have a large colored square recorded. That said, for what you are trying to do, a DSLR is probably not what you ...


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They mean the exact same thing they do in the photography context. The mm measurement is the focal length. It determines the angle of view the lens produces (ie, how "zoomed in" it appears.) Lenses with a range are zoom lenses where the angle of view can be adjusted. "Zoom" is otherwise not a meaningful thing. Optically, zoom just means you can change ...


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