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37

FFmpeg is indeed a powerful video encoder/decoder tool¹. It operates in the command line, as opposed to using a GUI. Command line is that black window you find by clicking [windows+r] and typing cmd then hitting enter. This is also called "command prompt". Once setup you enter ffmpeg commands in one of these windows to use it. Here are the basic steps to "...


7

What you are talking about is upscaling and any current HDTV will do upscaling automatically. Upscaling doesn't work miracles though, it will only make it so that the lower quality signal can be watched on a higher quality display. It just multiplies the pixels so that a 720 by 480 (.9 pixel compressed) signal for example doesn't end up only taking up 1/4 ...


4

@DigiVision media gives a very good answer that covers the default way of installing it, I'd like to propose another method that is good for noobs and pros alike: Chocolatey is a package manager, it's a bit like the Microsoft Store, except that it's actually useful, it's all free, and it runs on the commandline. With chocolatey, installing ffmpeg—and ...


4

The cabling is likely your problem. The composite cables you're using (red, yellow, white) will only move analog signal from the set top box to the TV. Likewise with RG59 or RG6 (coaxial). While both varieties of cables there are technically capable of passing digital signals (they don't care... they're just dumb cables), set top boxes typically only ...


2

Use variable bitrate to cut down on filesize 4 GB / 65 min = 8.2 Mb/s which is in the norm for DVD quality so fixed bitrate should be fine


1

First, have your subject(s) rehearse the heck out of their presentation if that is practical. If you have access to a Mac, place it near a wall, preferably white. Bounce a cheap lamp off the wall to give your subject soft diffused light, and record using Quicktime (it's free). You can do quick edits right inside Quicktime if you need to. Dave Shaheen ...


1

What I would do is concentrate on the setup in front of the camera, to make sure that what you're recording is the best quality it can be, in order to avoid the need for post. Set up your lights so that you have good, soft-ish (no harsh shadows) lighting that is well colour balanced. A 3-point light setup is the standard way of lighting interview subjects, ...


1

Using Google, a popular internet search engine, the Adobe help page that discusses this topic is easily discovered. In particular, it explains: You must connect to the Internet when you want to install Adobe Creative Cloud apps, such as Photoshop and Illustrator. Once the apps are installed on your computer, you don’t need an ongoing Internet connection ...


1

Yes, you can broadcast more than one program service (channel) from a single location. This is fairly common. For analog over the air (NTSC), you can use combiners and a broadband antenna. (See, for example, Whitaker & Benson, 2000 chs. 15 & 16)* For any of the digital over the air or satellite delivery standards, multiplexing is part of the ...


1

After a long time of messing aroung I got it to work by tricking the software into thinking it was actually in the default location it likes at 'C:\Program Files\Adobe' by creating directory junctions. In order for it to work the hard drive must be formatted with the NTFS filesystem. I used http://code.google.com/p/symlinker/ to create the directory ...


1

It is more important for the mic to be close enough to the talent than it is for the mic to be pointed perfectly on-axis at the talent's mouth. A cardiod 12" away that's 45 degrees off-axis will likely sound better than a cardiod 36" away that's dead-on. Shotgun mics give you a bit more range, and a bit less tolerance for off-axis pickup. But then again, ...


1

They are all forms of hardware acceleration, which broadly, just means that specialized hardware is doing things faster than the basic CPU normally could. The exact nature of what each type of acceleration does depends entirely on the software you are using and the hardware you are using. Some hardware is very purpose specific. Something like Intel ...


1

You should try FFsplit, is easy to use and free. With proper settings you should loose few or no data at all. Setup the encoder to match the quality (bitrate and aspect ratio) of the original file. Add a new layer of window capturing, and adjust width, height and origin (x,y) to capture only the region of the video Setup hotkeys on ffsplit so you can start ...


1

Instead of the Teradek unit, I would try the new Epiphan Pearl, which can stream and record to/from multiple sources.


1

The GoPro would be a perfect candidate for what you want. It's a so called "action camera" and is a very robust (water tight with case) wide-angle camera that can shoot in very high frame rates with HD resolution (even more at lower frame rates). Suitable recording options for high speed sport events would 1080p @ 60FPS or 720p @ 120FPS. The camera also has ...


1

I personally run my OS off of my HDD (primarily from lack of room on my SSDs) and run my Adobe suite, temp files, swap files, project files and media files all off the SSD. In order of importance, I would say swap files, temp files, media files, project files, Adobe software, OS. Put as many as you can on the SSDs. An SSD has no seek time, so multiple ...


1

The question is whether disk performance is critical in your normal workflow, in which case you'd want to place the footage on the SSD. I have a similiar setup with Sony Vegas and I observed that, disk performance is rather uncritical during rendering, because it's always the processor that's the bottle neck. But your situation may differ from that. ...


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