7

420 vs 422 only really matters in terms of color accuracy. The significant part is 8 bit vs 10 bit. The reason RAW files give so much recover-ability is that they are typically 12, or in the case of your 1D mark 4, 14 bit files. Every extra bit doubles the total number of possible values that can be stored. Some of this goes in to having more detail ...


7

It's an artifact of the player, not the encoder. I used the command below to generate a RGB format capture in HuffYUV ffmpeg -f dshow -video_size 1920x1080 -framerate 30 -i video="screen-capture-recorder" -c:v huffyuv -t 5 cap.mkv Then transcoded the file to x264 lossless RGB ffmpeg -i cap.mkv -c:v libx264rgb -crf 0 -preset ultrafast h264rgb.mkv ...


5

Place those options before -i "1" In ffmpeg, parameters and flags apply to the next input/output entry. So, ffmpeg {-flags for input1} -i input1 {-flags for input2} -i input2 {-flags for output1} output1 {-flags for output2} output2


4

The distortion you are seeing has nothing to do with ProTune or other codec settings. Its perspective distortion caused by the wide focal length of the GoPro Lens + The low quality of the GoPro Lens itself. When I say low quality, I mean that in relative terms. The GoPro lens actually produces a pretty amazing image for what it is. But even when you enable ...


4

You can't just call a filter, You must instantiate a filter graph. First you need to create a buffer and buffersink via: AVFilterContext* source = 0; AVFilterContext* sink = 0; AVFilterGraph *graph = avfilter_graph_alloc() avfilter_graph_create_filter(&source, avfilter_get_by_name("buffer"), nullptr, args, nullptr, graph); AVBufferSinkParams* ...


3

DSLRs tend to have much larger image sensors than camcorders, which tends to mean much less depth of field (DOF) for a given field of view. Shallow DOF is great for isolating subjects from their background, but it's a nightmare when you actually want the subject and its context to be in focus together. Most DLSR lenses have a limited zoom ratio and/or ...


3

As mentioned by @Mulvya, I think the issue is the "slow" preset. One option is encoding a compressed stream that is also lossless. For example, the x264 encoder can do this using "-preset ultrafast -qp 0". This will probably result in failing your 3rd requirement (compatibility), but since it's lossless, you can transcode later onto cheap spinning disks. ...


3

"I, B and P" don't refer to the viewed frames, they refer to the encoded, stored forms of the frames. However the frame is encoded in the file or stream, when it appears on the screen or is extracted as a still it is a complete frame, reconstructed from the IBP information as needed.


3

libx264 is a very efficient encoder, so that bitrate isn't unusual. In fact, it's on the higher side, but since you're capturing a game, I expect there is constant motion involved, and your preset is ultrafast which disables some of the aggressive compression. When you say 80MB/s, I believe you're thinking of uncompressed full raster i.e. 1280 x 720 x 12 ...


3

Most consumer video recording software I know compresses on capture. Mpeg and others can be configured for lower quality if you want greater compression, but unless you are recording a plain black screen at night in the dark, nothing will give you the level of compression you mention - it just isn't possible.


3

It's a bit of a semantics game. The YUY2 video mode is not "compressed," but it won't result in a bit-exact copy of RGB input. The luminance is full resolution in that mode, but the chrominance is sampled at a lower resolution. This is technically decimation rather than compression, but some information is indeed lost. That said, if you are ...


2

FFMpeg might do what you need. It's pretty powerful commandline tool to convert video formats, sizes, etc. Here is a clear and simple tutorial for installing FFMpeg and using basic functions Here is a specific SuperUser thread about using it to cut small clips from a larger clip. So is their any video player or software by which i can crop/split video ...


2

In this case, the problem didn't come from ffmpeg/avconv. The rawvideo source I use offers different color formats to be used: argb32 rgb24 bgr24 yuv444 yuv420 [...] When I extract a png file (which was fine), the bgr24 color format is used. When I capture a video, avconv automatically chose one of the yuv formats. I guess the clamping to (16..235) did ...


2

You can capture a live-view feed from your USB-connected Canon DSLR with gphoto2 (param: --capture-movie). The biggest limitation here is that the resulting mjpeg stream resolution is 1056x704, and that's the highest possible quality via USB. This mjpeg stream can be piped to ffmpeg. As an alternative, you could get yourself an USB<>Mini-HDMI recording ...


2

As you know there are two solutions, one using your CPU, the other a dedicated GPU. CPU Solution As of today, the CPU solution exit for 4K content, at 60 fps, using x265 or x264 codec. x264 is embededded in OBS in fact, and x264/x265 are known for being the fastest implementation of the standard H264/H265. But, you need a powerful CPU, of course, and then ...


2

Here is a blog posting from one of the leading LED fixture manufacturers, SORAA. (Their chief scientist won the Nobel Prize for the invention of the blue LED.) One of the design problems is that a rippler-suppressor reduces LED output efficiency by 2%-3%. If you are a consumer looking for absolute Lumens from a given form factor, or highest Lumens per ...


2

Focus is focus is focus, whether for still or video. But the story does not end there. Focal length, aperture, sensor size, circle of confusion, etc., all play a role in determining whether you perceive something to be in focus or not. Here's a link to the math. The long and short of it is that quite often a camera that shoots both stills and video will ...


2

We used the NaturalPoint OptiTrack S250e at my company for a big project that is still in active use today. We used it for a sort of game like exhibition on fairs. So it had to be quite robust and offer stable tracking in changing environments. It is primarily used for movies and video games though. They offer quite a few different systems in price ranges ...


2

GDIgrab supplies a RGB feed so the colorkey filter can work here. Try ffmpeg -i 1.mp4 -f gdigrab -framerate 25 -video_size 300x200 -i title="MyWindow" -filter_complex "[1]split[m][a]; [a]format=yuv444p,geq='if(gt(lum(X,Y),0),255,0)',hue=s=0[al]; [m][al]alphamerge[ovr]; [0][ovr]overlay=(main_w-overlay_w):main_h-overlay_h[v]" -map "[v]" -c:v libx264 -r 25 ...


2

90% of good sound quality is mic placement. The remaining 90% is the microphone. The 90% that remains of that is the preamp. Because mic placement is so important, you either have to accept putting the video camera where the microphone sounds best, or you have to disconnect the two, placing and pointing the mic where it is best and then placing pointing ...


2

Use ffmpeg -start_at_zero -copyts -ss 00:00:14.435 -i input.mp4 -vf "drawtext=fontfile=/path/to/Arial.ttf: fontsize=45:fontcolor=yellow:box=1:boxcolor=black:x=(W-tw)/2:y=H-th-10: text='Time\: %{pts\:hms}'" -vframes 1 output.png


2

So I solved this by simply adding an audio stream instead of having "none" selected. Doing this makes -framedrop (default) work properly. I left the master clock as default as well (audio) instead of changing it to ext.


2

The problem is almost definitely with the tape or the VCR. Most likely the sync or black level is off or the control track is fluttering, which is throwing off the ADC in the capture dongle. You will need a time base corrector (TBC) or frame synchronizer to correct the problem. Ideally, you should also have a way to view and adjust the video levels. Usually ...


2

Windows Media Encoder creates files in wmv format (I guess), which is highly compressed. Make sure you follow the YouTube recommendations


2

Try to use OBS (Open Broadcast Software) for screen capture. Screen Capture with OBS It not best option, but it easy to use and it free. Best solution: Capture to lossless codec like huffyuv, edit it and then encode for youtube (you can find tons guides about it). It requires much more time to process, but you will get maximum quality.


2

Streaming video between internally networked systems has become the standard in the Video Production / Post Production professional environment. There is a lot to read about this but the answer to your question is yes, it is possible in today's world. In fact, it's done every day in the broadcast industry. Everything changed since we've had the ability to ...


2

It is best to match the source dimensions with your recoding dimensions. Using a larger number of pixels requires more data or bandwidth to encode the scaled source. You wont be able to make a sharper image as there isnt any additional information being generated and in fact the scale up might make the image softer or add artifacts like aliasing.


2

You pretty much found it out yourself. Use 24FPS, 1/48, Aperture around f4. (Depending on your sensor size) You really can't get a 1:1 look as our eyes have a diffrent way to see the world than a camera. But those settings will feel natural when used right. Also think about how you film, many people say shoulder rigs feel the most natural as you have a ...


2

For future videos, you better have a defined reference in all videos. For example a clapperboard or a standardized grey card. Then you can match all videos during colour grading both regarding the white balance and exposure. Usually editors let you set the black and white point or midtone with a colour picking tool that you use on the clapperboard or ...


1

Capturing video on macOS is easy. Doing so without losing any quality whatsoever is not trivial. Simple Approach If you want simple and don't mind slight color inaccuracy, you can go with ScreenFlow. It'll take care of most heavy lifting for you including the final encoded video. Free alternatives to doing this are using CamTwist and sending its output ...


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