33

The default settings for ffmpeg are very low quality, and since you don't specify any codec or quality parameters it's just using the defaults (I don't know why the devs don't fix that because it generates a lot of questions on forums everywhere). Edit: the defaults are now quite sane. With a recent (as in later than 2017) build of ffmpeg you don't need to ...


25

The image sequence muxer has a start number option, so ffmpeg -i video.webm -start_number 98 image-%03d.png


12

Let me explain you from scratch. MOV, MP4, AVI, MKV etc all these are just containers, It is just kind of wrapper which contains audio, video, text, metadata file together as one file. It does not play a big role in the size of a file. Size of the file heavily depends on audio and video codec and bit-rate of that audio video codecs. So there is a ...


8

Hope this explanation is what you're looking for: When you transcode to an encoding such as H.264 (MPEG-4 part 10) you necessarily also resample the video, that's part of H.264 compression technique. Nontheless, I doubt if this is the reason you experience a timing gap since the resampling doesn't necessarily influence the clock rate of the media. So, I ...


8

Generally, H.264 and H.265 (as well as others like VP9) are lossy codecs, at least in their default settings with most encoders. This means that whenever you re-encode from one to another (or even in the same codec), you throw away information. Whether this information loss is visible or not depends on your source material and the chosen settings, of course....


7

You may want to use FFMPEG's lut3d filter. It requires you to provide a look-up table (a *.cube file). For example, if you have an ARRI camera you can generate these files using ARRI Color Tool or simply download a package with them from the linked page. Once you have the files, use FFMPEG like this: ffmpeg -i "Input.mov" -vf lut3d="ARRIP3D65PQ108-33....


6

If you copied your command there then your issue is probably -acodec:0 mp. That should be -acodec:0 mp3. You can just use -c:a mp3 to apply the encoding options to all audio tracks at once, no need to apply them for each individually. Other than that your mapping is correct and shouldn't be the issue. Edit: To conclude the discussion in the comments ...


6

Apparently by default ffmpeg only copies one stream of each type. To tell it to copy all streams, you need -map 0 So, this does it: ffmpeg -i "concat:a01.mxf|b02.mxf" -y -map 0 -c copy result.mxf


6

You are using the same bitrate for each video. The bitrate determines how much data is used per second. The resolution has nothing to do with how much data is used, it only impacts the number of points of data which are encoded (and thus determines part of the quality of the video output for a given bitrate). What you end up with is a lower resolution ...


6

The differences between your "works" and "doesn't work" examples are: resolution framerate Codec Tag Codec Level and you can set these using ffmpeg: ffmpeg.exe -i /temp/input.mp4 -c:v mpeg4 -level 3.0 -vtag XVID -s 544x416 -r 25 -qscale 0 /temp/out.avi Qscale 0 will produce a large file but maintain the best quality. Please note that changing the ...


5

For VHS, the signal will be kept highest quality if you connect via s-video, so yes, you should use an s-video cable if your VCR has an s-video output. Depending on how good your VCR is, you may get a significant improvement from a better deck. Quality of the read heads on various VCRs can vary a fair bit and while the majority of the difference was in ...


5

One big loss in converting VHS to DVD arises from going through the composite domain. Both VHS and MPEG2 use a separated chroma paradigm -- on the VHS tape are two signals, essentially luma and bandwidth-limited chroma. MPEG2 (the standard for DVD) also uses separate luma and chroma. But the standard output from a VHS player combines the signals in a way ...


5

As you are hardcoding subtitles, the video (with the subtitles added) will be re-encoded. You can use the CRF rate control method to modulate the quality of the output. So, start with ffmpeg -i grdedFinal.mov -vf subtitles=portSbs.srt -crf 18 -c:a copy gradedFinalwithSubs.mov If the quality's not acceptable, lower that value till it is - in exchange for ...


5

The WAV header is typically 32-bits. Your output will need 64 bits. ffmpeg -i source.thd -c:a pcm_s24le -ar 48000 -rf64 auto output.wav


4

As far as deinterlacing: With a good deinterlacer (QTGMC, or at least ffmpeg's yadif=3,mcdeint=2), you can get smooth video at 60000/1001 (NTSC) fps. If your source has quick motions that you'd like to look smooth, even in slo-mo, then deinterlace 640x480i60 -> 640x480p60. If you really need small files, you can drop every other frame of the deinterlaced ...


4

Although @stib's advice is sound, I disagree with "to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality". Cameras have to compress on-the-fly, so they use constrained baseline mode, which is to say, they skip most of the tricks that H.264 codec uses to efficiently compress videos. If space isn't a pressing concern, keep them as-...


4

Update: The VLC TS is malformed. First run ffmpeg -i vlc-output.ts -c copy ffmpeg-output.ts and then ffmpeg -i ffmpeg-output.ts -c copy working.mp4 The main thing that looks off is the timebase 1000k tbn. Try ffmpeg -i vlc-output.ts -c copy -video_track_timescale 90k car-free\ tourism.mp4


4

Using ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, you can convert these DATs to MP4 (or MKV): ffmpeg -i input.dat -c:v libx264 -crf 20 -c:a aac -b:a 128k -movflags +faststart output.mp4 Your VLC output doesn't mention it but if the inputs are interlaced (likely), then use ffmpeg -i input.dat -vf yadif -c:v libx264 -crf 20 -c:a aac -b:a 128k -movflags +faststart ...


4

Quality-wise, it's better to use the original MOVs, but if the MP4-based stacking looks ok, that's the final arbiter. ffmpeg -i left.mov -i centre.mov -i right.mov -filter_complex "[0:v:0][1:v:0][2:v:0]hstack=inputs=3" -c:v libx264 -tune film -crf 16 -b:a 256k triple.mp4 When using the originals, it doesn't matter whether you do it in one step or two. For ...


3

Somewhat of an duplicate of: Can I manually change an .mp4 to .m4v by changing the extension in the Finder (mac) or explorer (win)? MP4 and M4V are essentially the exact same thing, M4V is usually used to indicate video only files but some sofware/companies are using it for standard MP4 files with video AND audio (lots of Apple software f.e.). It's just a ...


3

HD video is very, very large at high quality. 450MB for two minutes isn't actually that bad. To put it in perspective, assuming you were shooting 1080P and 24fps, if there was no compression applied, that same 2 minutes of video would be 6 gigabytes of information. The reason that videos you download or watch on bluray disks are so much smaller is that ...


3

That's way more than h.264 can handle. The maximum resolution for h.264 is 4096×2304 with Level 5.1 or 5.2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H.264#Levels There are lossless codecs who can theoretically handle this video resolution but it would make no sense to do this. There is no hardware capable of playing videos in this resolution at any acceptable frame ...


3

The 'interface connector' is (almost certainly) a serial control port, not a video output. LVD stored composite analog video, so there are no chroma or difference signals available to assist in digitizing the video.


3

A lot of these answers seem somewhat misleading unfortunately. Forget about getting a capture card. Practically every one has AGC. AGC is very similar to macrovision, except it's superimposed onto any video source. It's impossible to disable unless you use Linux and know your way around hacking drivers. Some cards on Windows have third party tools to ...


3

Many different factors can contribute to stutter in video playback. It could be a CPU issue (check your CPU when playing the video) in which case, a simpler codec or a player that can leverage the graphics card for decoding would help. It could also be data rate related though. In this case, using a simpler format would actually compound the problem as ...


3

Assuming DVD quality would be enough, you may consider archiving 720p mpeg-4 files with a bitrate of 2 Mbits, which would equate roughly to 1 hour = 1 GB data. That would mean 27,000 hours = 27,000 GB = 27 Terabytes. So you need to consider a 50 TB storage system (including redundancy and overhead) and a tape backup system as well (LTO-6 has an uncompressed ...


3

Use Avanti with ffmpeg. The former has a job control manager where you drop in multiple files at once and go. You can find webm encoding guide for ffmpeg here: http://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/Encode/VP8 Use crf mode encoding and experiment till you get desired size. Set b:v high like 10M and tweak CRF value and if you have no audio, use -an in place of -c:a ...


3

Yes, it seems to be a problem of generated timecode. See https://trac.videolan.org/vlc/ticket/12713#no1 Switch to ffmpeg (with a GUI like Avanti) to avoid this issue. My answer to an earlier webm question may guide you on settings.


3

Judge based on the quality rather than the bitrate value. Use CRF mode encoding and if the quality isn't what you can accept, decrease the CRF value. ffmpeg -i "%%a" -s 3840x2610 -c:v libx264 -crf 18 -acodec copy D:\%%~na.mp4


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