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28

FFmpeg is indeed a powerful video encoder/decoder tool¹. It operates in the command line, as opposed to using a GUI. Command line is that black window you find by clicking [windows+r] and typing cmd then hitting enter. This is also called "command prompt". Once setup you enter ffmpeg commands in one of these windows to use it. Here are the basic steps to "...


26

As of December 2018, Adobe Creative Cloud aps, such as Premier, After Effects and Adobe Media Encoder give you the ability to encode in ProRes without any post-hoc conversion. If you don't use Adobe CC aps or want a free, open source tool, ffmpeg can encode video using ProRes, and runs cross-platform. This ffmpeg command: ffmpeg -i input.avi -c:v ...


8

You should be able to tell just by looking at it. When you watch for motion and see a comb-like horizontal pattern, the video is interlaced. You could also try pausing the video at several points and looking for this pattern, but not every frame will look interlaced. Pause the video at points where there is quick motion, and step forward one frame at a ...


8

You can use ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, to do this: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf setpts=8*PTS -r 30 -crf 18 output.mp4 This slows down the video 8 times and output is 30 FPS.


6

It's because you're using Adaptive Resolution, where AE will attempt to let you scrub through quickly, by reducing the resolution it shows in the viewer. Higher powered computers will be able to show higher resolution in the viewer more quickly. There's an explanation in Adobe's help here: https://helpx.adobe.com/after-effects/using/previewing.html There ...


6

Here's a way to do it with the blackdetect and trim filters. First, a better way to get the blackdetect output is via ffprobe because it is capable of writing structured data such as XML, JSON or one key=value per line. You do this using metadata injection: ffprobe -f lavfi -i "movie=/path/to/input.mp4,blackdetect[out0]" -show_entries tags=lavfi....


5

I think pretty much every editing program would allow you to zoom, pan and insert text. Inserting another video into the main video is a little more complex and the only program I know for sure that does it is After Effects. But I'm sure there are others that will. I would suggest using Premiere because it's a very powerful program. Even though I've never ...


5

I tried kdenlive, so I'll post my findings about it as an answer. It didn't quite do the job, so I'm not going to mark this as the accepted solution. kdenlive easily imports my clips in mjpeg+pcm, and flac. And looks like it can export through ffmpeg, which is what I want. It has a feature to "set audio reference", and for other tracks, "align audio to ...


5

I've not used it, but Microsoft makes Microsoft Movie Maker. It might meet your needs. There are also some open source video editors you might have luck with: ShotCut - http://www.shotcut.org - kind of new, might be buggy Blender - http://www.blender.org - it's a 3D modelling app with video editing capabilities Lightworks - http://www.lwks.com - there's ...


5

Your KAZAM video features YUV444P pixel format which WMP may not support without extra filters. Using ffmpeg, run ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -pix_fmt yuv420p -c:a copy -movflags +faststart out.mp4 You can also use ffmpeg itself to capture screen and sound on linux. Basic syntax would be ffmpeg -f v4l2 -i VIDEO -f alsa -i AUDIO -pix_fmt yuv420p -b:a 64k cap.mp4 ...


5

You can extract the file name directly from the for replacement parameter. No need to set a new variable at all. for %f in (*.mp4) do ffmpeg -i "%f" -vn -ar 44100 -ac 1 -b:a 32k -f mp3 "%~nf.mp3" If you want to do more complicated string munging, it's much more intuitive in Powershell: ls *.mp4|foreach{ ffmpeg -i $_ -vn -ar 44100 -ac 1 -b:a 32k -f mp3 ...


4

The most easy to use Video Editing Software I know is Magix Video Delux. It has HD capabilities, a lot of fixed crossover effects and is available for Windows 7. My mother swears by it and she still has trouble sending mails and stuff. For more advanced users there's the option of timeline editing, but most of the things you can do in a block overview - ...


4

I think the simplest way to this is to use MP4Box. ./MP4Box -add file1.mp4 -cat file2.mp4 -cat file3.mp4 output.mp4


4

Windows won't help you with this. There are several file info programs available. I use MediaInfo, which I like especially for the context menu entry "MediaInfo" that allows you to quickly open video files and view their meta data in the program. It shows mostly anything there is to know about the video file. The information you are looking for will be ...


4

All anyone might be able to say is that there are no known holes in the various players. (I don't know if that's true, just that it's impossible to know that there are no undiscovered bugs in a complex piece of code.) H.264 streams are complex enough to have lots of corner cases. They're parsed with speed-optimized code written in C and assembly. You're ...


4

I would get as far away from EE as possible. Using the x264 tool, and mp4box, you can convert and segment out the files which are ready to be streamed to any dash compatible players. Especially since you mentioned using batch scripts, this is a great solution I think. This is a good guide: http://www.dash-player.com/blog/2014/11/mpeg-dash-content-generation-...


4

Using ffmpeg, ffmpeg -i video.avi -vf field=top top%d.png and ffmpeg -i video.avi -vf field=bottom bottom%d.png


4

Sure, you have to combine the field extraction with interleaving. ffmpeg -i video.avi \ -filter_complex "[0]field=top[t];[0]field=bottom[b];[t][b]interleave" -r 50 fld%d.png where the r value is double the original frame rate (or the same as the field rate).


3

FFmpeg should be able to do this - assuming you don't mind getting down with the command line (there may be some GUI options out there too possibly). My Olympus E-P3 produces .MTS files - I assume they're similar (AVC/AC3 in a Blu-Ray Video wrapper). I ran the following command: ffmpeg -i 00001.MTS -vcodec copy -acodec copy -f mp4 00001.mp4 That just ...


3

Analyzing the files that fail to open in contrast to those that do open just fine shows one glaring problem: All lines in the project.prel file (which is just an XML file) where there should be decimal numbers in <StartKeyframe> or <Keyframe> tags are damaged. Example: Correct version: <StartKeyframe>-91445760000000000,100.,0,0,0.,0.,0.,...


3

Not enough info. Try getting a copy of the GSpot Codec Information program (google it) and report back here what it says about the file. Size is almost certainly not the problem.


3

After tearing my hair out I found the "hand cursor", now I can drag the panel around however I want it :)


3

I can recommend Adapter. It is a Wrapper for the ffmpeg package and does its job pretty well. Because of its easy UI. You could also use ffmpeg directly via macports, but I think that Adapter is far easier to control.


3

I use VLC Media Player. It will play most any format and will play DVD straight from the disc. Play the video and slow it way down during a motion sequence using the little double arrows next to the time line. It will clearly show the interlace if it is present.


3

On Windows, I recommend FootageStudio 4K. It is a commercial converter (not cheap) that supports many professional formats, including ProRes.


3

I've tried a bunch of front ends for ffmpeg and finally settled on Tencoder. Widows only. It has a preset for ProRes and is very easy to customize so you can crete setting for often used formats or settings. It is multithreaded and allows you to do batch processing.


3

This is the command line I have used to encode ProRes 4444. If you do not include -bits_per_mb you will get low res results in Windows 10. Many posts do not mention this little aspect. ffmpeg -y -f mov -i input-file.mov -vcodec prores_ks -pix_fmt yuva444p10le -profile:v 4444 -bits_per_mb 8000 -s 1920x1080 output-file.mov


3

Use ffmpeg -i in.avi -r 50 -filter:v "setpts=0.5*PTS" out.avi or ffmpeg -i in.avi -r 50 -filter:v "setpts=N/50/TB" out.avi If you want to interpolate new frames, use ffmpeg -i in.avi -r 50 -filter:v "yadif,framerate=50" out.avi yadif is a deinterlacing filter, which is needed since the framerate filter does not operate on interlaced media.


3

As far as I am aware, there isn't a way to disable Mercury Transmit if the viewer covers the UI, unless you set up a key binding. You can assign a keyboard shortcut to the "Enable Transmit" function in the keyboard preferences (I use ctrl+shift+' as it's similar to the maximise window shortcut). You can then use this key combination to toggle the full screen ...


3

The concat protocol is the wrong choice for most file formats. Transport streams like MPEG-TS are one of the few formats which can be concatenated this way. All this method does is a crude appendation of each input to the previous input. So, any format which has a metadata element, can't be concatenated this way as the metadata of the other files will be in ...


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