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7

Look at ffmpeg. It will run on just about anything and should do what you want, although it might depend on what your source actually is Something like this should work : ffmpeg -i sourcefile.avi -f image2 'img-%03d.jpeg' (see the image2 section for full reference)


4

If the frame-rate is not too high and you can associate a frame with a precise timestamp then the easiest would be to add the metadata as textual subtitles. The other option is to mux the metadata as standard headers in .mp4 or similar container format. .mp4 can be broken down into multiple fragments, each one with its own header, and theoretically this can ...


4

For a good GUI based on libavcodec (which a ffmpeg library), take a look at handbrake. Might be a bit too detailed for a very "simple" user, but with some effort it's manegable. It also supports saving of presets, so you can set it up for easy use.


2

Try those calculators, they should do the trick. http://www.digitalrebellion.com/webapps/videocalc


2

MP4 format does support chapters. You can use free Drax utility to create them. Please note that not all video players support MP4 chapters. You need to find one that does (VLC ?)


2

I'm not sure how this fits into a streaming strategy, but the DPX file format includes per-frame metadata (potentially a great deal of it). This Wikipedia article has the basic info. I'm also not clear on what you mean by 'bound permanently'. In the AVI file container the "I" stands for "Interleaved", where video and audio packets (roughly) alternate in the ...


1

This is most likely a problem related to the app you are using to create/view these stop-motion videos. If you have portrait-orientated pictures, creating a video accordingly is simply a matter of setting the right video dimensions (i.e. video width and height in pixels); basically every video editing software allows you to set this manually or choose from a ...


1

Containers don't support encryption of metadata, and without encryption everyone may change what he wants (even damaging by his action the whole multimedia file). There is a possibility to make a checksum of your file (as SHA-256), but it will not protect to change it, it only helps detect if the file is in its original state (not changed).


1

Try the following: use the adobe media encoder preferably, or some other encoder to encode the file as something like prores422 or prores4444. use a different player, like vlc, djv, etc. Check if you have all codecs installed, for quicktime and h.264, etc. Open the file on a different machine. If it still won't work, it's probably the file that's the root ...


1

Yes, you will lose information from the grade if you save as 8-bit. Here's a thought experiment to illustrate. Say your original red level for a pixel was 128 out of 256 (00001111 / 11111111), and then in Resolve you grade it (using the internal 32-bit floating point colour in Resolve) to be a little bit brighter, say 128.25. Now you'll need to save it in ...


1

Turns out the answer is yes. Such format is called CinemaDNG and is used for professional video production since 2009. Here's the spec for the format: http://download.macromedia.com/pub/labs/cinemadng/cinemadng_p1_spec_091009.pdf Among other things it supports: Integer sensor values of any bit depth from 8 to 32 bits Arbitrary size color filter arrays ...


1

I've always used H.264 and have never had any issues with anyone being able to view it on Windows or Mac. H.264 is my standard go-to for formats, but as you mentioned, it might not hurt to convert it to several different codecs/formats, especially if it is a small file.


1

I just found out how to solve my problem. The H.264 codec is the issue, it somehow does not work with it and AE gives you a warning: Output file will be resized from 2085 x 2560 (1.0 PAR) to 2000 x 2000 (1.0 PAR) to meet format constraints. Solution: I went with the MPEG4 codec and it worked as I wanted.


1

You can use ffmpeg*, a command-line tool, to do this. Let's say your source video is 360x640, then to make it 4:3, use ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf pad=854:640:247:0 -c:v libx264 -crf 20 -c:a copy output.mp4 where 854 is used because it's 4/3 of 640, and 247 places the video in the center of the padded canvas. See details for the pad filter here. Similarly ...


1

You don't need separate video tracks. All the differences are in the audio, which is a minuscule part of the overall data on a BVD. It's a simple matter for a player to select one of multiple audio tracks.


1

FLV is an Adobe container for streaming video. Historically, FLVs usually contained a variety of codecs (such as FLV1, Sorenson..etc) but nowadays it's usually H.264. Which is to say, the video may already be MP4 compatible. You may not need to recompress the video at all, and could simply transfer it from a FLV container to MP4, bypassing Premiere. ffmpeg ...


1

With Adobe you can render most things through Adobe Media Encoder. AME has the ability to render one project file as different formats and you can actually create somewhat of a list and it will treat it as a queue.


1

The logo on the manual I could find indicates that it was standard 8mm, not Hi8 or Digital8. If you are in a PAL region, then most likely it is the PAL version of 8mm. You should be able to use any PAL based 8mm playback deck or camcorder to play the tape back. You then be able to use a standard video capture device to digitize the video that you playback....


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