Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Do you expect the large image to be seamless, both in dimension and in tone? Each is a separate challenge. Color-matching 8 projectors can be daunting, depending on the technology. As a general rule, you would overlap the images from the projectors and feather their edges. This costs you something in size, with the benefit of disguising mismatches to some ...


6

No, there is no practical limit that we know of yet to what would be best, there is however a practical limit to what we can capture and display. In tests with airforce pilots, subjects were able to identify a plane from being shown a frame for only 1/220th of a second.1 They eye is able to pull information out of extremely short periods of time, but ...


5

A year after posting this question, I'm getting a few extra comments and answers, which is really great. It is technically still a problem, but let me share what I've learned in the last year, in case anyone else stumbles on this page with a similar problem. We came up with two inexpensive solutions to the problem which I think will work, in the right ...


5

As said by AJ Henderson and Jim Mack, you should just use one computer with multiheaded video. On an X11-based window system, you can use xrandr to organise the screen segments. Most operating systems have also GUI tools for doing this. The biggest problem will probably be the fine alignment. Most good projectors have settings for perspective correction ...


5

It depends entirely on the type of rendering you are doing and the specs of your computer. Bottle necks can occur in many different parts of the rendering pipeline. Generally speaking, rendering is very GPU or CPU intensive, depending on if the render engine is CUDA (or similar) enabled. If the renderer is able to utilize a GPU, then GPUs and/or dedicated ...


4

The easiest way to do this is multiheaded video cards. Many video cards support 3 displays and it is possible to get cards that support even more than that, particularly via DisplayPort (which allows for chaining multiple displays on a single connection). When using multiple displays in Windows, it will allow you to specify how they are arranged and ...


4

One additional option on Linux setup will be DMX: http://dmx.sourceforge.net/ If enough heads per machine can not be supported and the presentation data is relatively "slow", DMX will provide a single, ultra high resolution X11 display to an application and will automatically split the image between multiple "slave" X servers forming a unified display wall. ...


4

The reason why modern TVs have been pushing higher framerates is not because people can see much beyond 30-60Hz, but because if the source framerate and the display framerate doesn't match exactly, then the display has to either drop frames, or add frames. This mismatch is visible, particularly during panning scenes, for instance. It used to be that made-...


3

The RedRocket card provides encoder and decoder support via specialized hardware that can do particular calculations well. Having multiple cards doubles the amount of calculations that can be done. Since at least some of the calculations can be done in parallel, having multiple cards increases the amount of processing power available. It probably wouldn't ...


3

When tracking there are two (main things) that you need to be concerned with in tracking. While there are many variables that need to be taken into account, when shooting there are two things that you should keep in mind. First off, contrast, 99% of all tracking software uses contrast in the luminance channel (brightness) to determine a point and where it ...


3

I researched this when building my own computer for HD video editing about a year ago - I don't remember all of my sources, but there's a hardware guide on the Adobe Primiere Hardware Forum (very helpful place) that was a big help. That guide is several years old, so the specific hardware recommended is out of date, but the principles are still there. ...


3

Your best bet is to save them on two disks, that is two back up copies. A RAID sounds nice, but have you ever had to replace a RAID system with a faulty controller? It can be a nightmare. Forget RAID as a back up unless you are talking about an instant snapshot retrieval system that is online 24/7. If you are talking about a long term back up as in a real ...


3

Drives are definitely the answer. My miniDV setup worked fine with 5400rpm, but HD playback looked like internet video from 2004. Upgraded to 7200rpm internal SATA drives, and ~most~ of the time, I've got good results. While I've never done any work with SSDs, I suspect those would be the ideal circumstance. For external drives, I've used 5400rpm USB2.0 ...


3

If you have a 8 core CPU I'd bet it is a fast one too, so that shouldn't be a problem. 16 GB is more than enough for HD, and DDR3 should ensure the speed. The GPU shouldn't have much to say as long as it's not crap. If you have 6 slow harddrives, it would be a bottleneck. You should have at least 7200 rpm disks!


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No, VGA ports on a laptop are output only.


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Dealing with HD video has two main components. The first is the ability to decode the highly compressed video (which is computationally intensive) and then is the ability to deal with the large uncompressed data (which is bandwidth intensive). The fastest encoders/decoders use the GPU on the graphics card to improve performance as a GPU is far more ...


3

As you mentioned, there are three important components; ram, CPU, and GPU. Another component worth considering is the hard drive. RAM isn't incredibly important unless you intend to be doing intense visual effects. In my opinion, 8 gigs is the sweet spot for cost right now. If you want to do effects with something like After Effects, Smoke, or Nuke, 16 ...


3

As currently stated, the answer is, you can't. The only thing special about that video is that it is very well planned out and coordinated with lots of lighting making it almost certainly outside your budget to reproduce something similar. The video work itself is all actually fairly basic. Any camera with a decent dynamic range and sharpness could ...


3

If you can't use green-screen (the ideal), I'd recommend a couple of things. First, use a screen with a matte surface to reduce specular reflections and present more diffuse ones. These are somewhat rarer that glossy ones. Second, angle the screen slightly top-forward, to deflect some reflections down and away from the camera. A slight parallax won't be ...


3

I haven't ever done exactly what you're trying to do, but I think I know how I could do it. Hopefully this answer is useful, or at least starts some discussion from people that do have more concrete experience. One of the important factors in your choice is going to be buying something that someone knows how to admin. I think you'd be fine with a ...


3

The Matrox graphics card is probably the easiest and most versatile approach. I use the TripleHead2Go, which as you'd assume sends a signal(s) to up to three monitors/projectors. Multiple computers will never stay in sync. I found this out the hard way the night of an event. In terms of software, if you're on OS X check out VDMX. There's a fully functional ...


3

I was in same situation when I started my project in 2014. After a lot of research i found a very good solution. I am running three projectors and one monitor on one computer so total 4 outputs i am using and it's working quite well. I am using mac pro black cylinder model and I bought resolume arena software which can play multiple videos at a time in ...


3

If you record (typical AVCHD) sub-30 Mbps 4:2:0 video to a card and 220Mbps 4:2:2 video to an external recording device, you will be hard pressed to tell the difference when you view it back on YouTube. Very, very hard pressed to tell the difference. However, if you plan to edit the video--changing contrast curves, color, saturation, etc., and especially ...


3

There are a number of photo tripods that allow you to invert the center column. When inverted, the camera sits between all the legs and can be pointed down. Another tripod design has a center column that can also be shifted to a horizontal position. This allows greater flexibility in terms of distance from the subject (and it also means you only have to ...


3

There is a hardware-accelerated VP8 encoder recently released by the University of Milan. Source and standalone binary for 64-bit Linux and compute 3.5, 5.0 and 5.2 capable NVidia GPU cards available at https://github.com/Italtel-Unimi/libvpx They say they have integrated the code into libav libs i.e. FFmpeg, but this hasn't been pushed into the FFmpeg ...


3

CPU's used to render graphics was a very very long time ago. GPU's surpassed CPU's for this almost 20 years ago. You absolutely do need to get a good graphics card, yes. Don't look for anything external - the amount of data transferred in and out of the graphics card means running through an interface will be so slow as to be unusable. You'll want one of ...


3

Are you in search of a "solution" when you appear to have NOT identified a "problem"? Are you editing video now? Is it too slow for what you need? Are you making artificially unreasonable assumptions about how fast video rendering should be? Can you change your workflow to reduce or eliminate high-end solutions to a low-end requirement? For example to let ...


3

First answer to "My question is if this heavy workload will decrease the life of my computer." Simply YES, BUT any work on a computer will decrease its life, but it does depend on the work being done and how intense it is, but on the other hand, computers are designed to work in different ways and workloads. Desktop Workstations like the HPs and Mac Pros ...


2

First question to ask is: Does your video editing software actually use your GPU at all in the editing process? If it isn't written to use CUDA then you will not benefit from getting a better video card, other than being able to view it in higher quality on the screen. For software that can, all of those factors are important: Memory size is likely to be ...


2

Aha! I found it. It's neither an audio nor a video device, but a Film Adapter Unit—a light source—for a CanoScan LiDE 700f. Misleading plug type.


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