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10

With your budget, I would suggest investing in a few basic lights and decent audio recording equipment. While a second camera is nice to have, creating production value with the non-picture parts of your films will make them a lot better. If you need to get second or third angle, just move the camera for a closeup and re-run the scene. Sure, it may take ...


6

This was shot with a Phantom HD camera. It's a special high-speed digital camera that can shoot at up to 1,500 fps (which is what the creators say they were shooting at). So he's likely the tech who setup this camera rig.


5

Do you realize people go through years of academical studies or expensive courses at private universities to learn all that? It's certainly not something you're going to master by watching a few Youtube videos ... If you want to seriously get into film making, I would suggest you take a course. Not necessarily a full blown film studies degree, but you could ...


5

Well there's a number of factors that come into play, but first and foremost, the reason a camera operator pulls focus (if shooting alone) or having a 1st AC/2nd AC pull focus is because if you care about what you're shooting, you want focus to be tack sharp. Focus pulling is required on today's full frame and large sensor cameras because the Hyperfocal is ...


4

To reduce or eliminate the greenish reflection on the front of the table, you can buy some dark gray or black construction paper, or something equally non-reflective, cut it to size, and tape it over the 2 dark rectangles on the front of the table. I have 3 different solutions for the foot-shadows on the floor. You could point a semi-dim spotlight directly ...


4

Is this an impression you have or based on statistics you read? My impression is the opposite: projects shot on film have become so noteworthy they get some press coverage for the fact alone they are shot on film. Then you have things like "interstellar" where the hype was about the 70mm or tarantino who says movies on digital are not sexy. What I heard is ...


4

I believe they are teleprompters. They contain the text of the speech the person at the podium is reading. In this case, the camera is very far away, so they can't be projected onto a half-mirror in front of the camera as is normally done. Here is a close-up of one used by President Obama.


4

@Martin A provided an very in-depth answer, but I feel that it's worth noting one more thing: focus is part of the creative toolbox that filmakers use. Pulling focus from one actor to another in a 2 shot can be used to emphasise a reaction, or it can be used to reveal foreground or backgrounds, or pick out a subject from a crowd. Autofocus is not always able ...


3

I know it's a long time since you asked this and likely no longer need it, but in case anyone else comes across this thread looking for the same kind of case (as I did!), look for "pop up" rackmount cases for audio mixers.


3

If you feel comfortable with learning from good Youtube resources, here's some channels that have tons of material to answer your questions: https://www.youtube.com/user/filmriot https://www.youtube.com/user/everyframeapainting https://www.youtube.com/user/D4Darious https://www.youtube.com/user/DSLRguide (even better: His Blog http://dslrguide.tv/blog/)


3

The minute you said "no lighting" you violate the premise of "look as professional as it could be and not too amateur". Lighting is not only about ensuring there are enough photons to actually record decent image on the camera's sensor. Lighting defines highlights and shadows, contrast ranges, areas of focus and mystery, etc. It is almost impossible to ...


2

Likely your issues were stemming from trying to edit with H264 files. This is something that FCP hates! Convert all your h264 footage to ProRes before you start editing (using Compressor, MPEG Streamclip, or the awesome Magic Bullet Grinder) and then edit with the ProRes files. Output your final 'Master File' as ProRes and then use Compressor to encode ...


2

I've never heard the terms On-line and Off-line editing used for audio. In the video world, off-line editing is a term used for the editing process, whereby you edit your footage (often compressed) and then export and EDl for the On-line editor to do the final assembly with higher quality picture, maybe adding titles and some transitions and color ...


2

Any camera with an HDMI or SDI output can can stream via wifi using a Teradek Cube (http://teradek.com/pages/cube). This setup will allow you to monitor and record via iOS or computer. It also supports remote recording over the internet (decoder needed). In addition to WiFi, Terdek also supports 3G/4G/LTE cellular networks via a USB modem.


2

Fedex has the highest bandwidth around... Mailing laptop hard drives, SSDs or USB sticks is probably your best bet and may well be cheaper than upgrading your Internet upload capabilities. Alternately, if you need a way to handle it over the Internet, I'd actually recommend getting a virtual private server. You might be able to find a file sharing service ...


2

Its hard to say what exactly is the issue without an error message. Maybe you haven't properly exported the maps and or setup SFM for Dota 2 content. There is a nice guide here that goes through the whole process step by step. You also want to check the cache and local file for both SFM and Dota 2, if an error gets detected re-export the Dota 2 content ...


2

I came up with another idea. This works if there is one main character in the scene. Let's call him/her Chris. 1) Start with an exterior shot of the house where the party is. Party sounds emanate from it (muffled of course). It sounds as though there are 20-30 people in the party. 2) Start in one room of the house, with the camera on Chris. Chris walks ...


2

I agree with @DrMayhem, but I have a few things to add. You only need one or two establishing shots that show the whole group. The audience will continue believing that you're in a room full of people after you show it to them once. For the establishing shot(s), you can shoot the same people, wearing different clothes & accessories, in front of a ...


2

Use OBS for the streaming, it can handle multiple inputs and is better than most softwares I have used for live streaming. Might require some time on YouTube watching tutorials but once it is set up you will be good to go. Good luck!


2

While there are tons of tutorials on the internet, which keep you learning your whole life (which isn't a bad thing) I would propose one option that I followed myself. Lynda.com has good quality videos about all aspects of documentary filmmaking - technology, conducting interviews, storytelling, editing, ... When I knew I had to take the next step in ...


2

There are camcorders that enable full-res uploads of their memory cards via WiFi. Thus, if your room has connectivity to your intranet, you can leave the card in the camcorder, hit upload when you are done, turn the camera off when the upload is done, do your customer edits and uploads, then wipe the card for the next day's work, all without walking 200 ...


2

The biggest reason for shooting on film is because...it looks like film. 20 years ago, Red Hat founder Bob Young told a story about branding that bears on this question. He explained that if you offer somebody who has never tasted Ketchup before two samples, one being the most popular brand in America (which enjoys > 80% market share) and the other being ...


2

For static shots they shoot what's called a background plate: the same scene shot from the same angle but without the foreground action. Then where the green is taken out the empty background shows through. If the camera is moving this presents a problem. This can be solved by using motion control - basically a robot arm with the camera on it that can ...


2

Story Your film needs drama. That is normally created by conflict or tension. Keep the story simple. It is better for your first film to be too simple than too ambitious. But it must have drama. Shot list or story boards Work out what your film will look like before you shoot. You don't need to storyboard, but you need to know what shots you want before ...


2

Up until the high-frame rate (HFR) section of the video I would have said that all you need is a Canon MP-E 65mm Macro Lens, a nice LED light (so as not to fry the poor bugs with all the IR radiation that comes from tungsten halogen sources), and a camera with a reasonable video codec that accepts Canon lenses. However, the HFR section is clearly in the ...


2

You don't do this in Camtasia as it doesn't appear that Camtasia supports pitch shifting at this point although there has definitely been some discussion of the topic for quite some time. There are alternate solutions however, ffmpeg has this capability through the atempo and aserate audio filters, I understand that you can do this with audacity and sox as ...


2

Here are some suggestions: Film the bike from a moving car. Have two people in the car, minimum: One for driving and one for filming. Shoot through open windows of the car, not through glass. Get every shot from every angle you need separately. Do all of your editing after recording, not in camera, using video editing software.


2

Gimbals are good for adding movement without shake, they're brilliant for run-n-gun documentary work where lugging a tripod slows you down. They're perfect when you're in the thick of things, using a wide lens to shoot close to the action. They take a bit of time to master, you need to practise steering them and think about the movement. You also need a ...


2

The DJI Mavik is one of the most affordable ready-to-fly drones with enough quality (4K) for expert-looking video production. Alternatively, you could strap an action camera, like a GoPro, to a non-camera drone. You'll likely have to heavily stabilize your footage in post. In the lowest of budget situations, if you just need a top-down aerial shot, simply ...


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