16

You can use ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, to do this. The basic command is ffmpeg -i input.mov -vf "setpts=(PTS-STARTPTS)/30" -crf 18 output.mov The 30 indicates the factor by which the video will be sped up.


10

If the video is meant to be played in a different orientation than its stored representation, then a rotation flag is set in the stream metadata. A compliant player uses that tag and rotates the video during playback. A tool like Mediainfo will display that data (if specified) like here: A tool like ffmpeg can reset the tag. Of course, you'll also want to ...


7

Yes - while playing the video, press the L key to increase playback speed and press the J key to decrease it. For further options, please reference the relevant Premiere Pro documentation.


4

While it is true that 720p video only has about half the data of a 1080p feed, the other thing you have to realize is that when you push the system beyond it's limit, it may spend a lot of time trying to process frames that it doesn't finish in time. Depending on how the player is configured, it may give up and try to catch up rather than finish rendering ...


4

525/60 digitized SD video according to Rec. 601 is indeed 720 pixels wide, 480 pixels high, including some blanking on the sides. Digital equivalent of 625/50 is 720x576. In both cases, frame aspect ratio is 4:3, this simply means that the pixels are not square. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-1_(Sony) To make matters more complex, only a subset of the ...


3

There are a couple factors which can be giving you lagy playback.You don't specify your bit rate or codec. If you are editing a processor intensive codec like h.264 (not a good idea) -the processor could start to be a bottleneck. If you are editing a less compressed format like ProRes your drive or RAM can start to become the bottleneck. Since that is the ...


3

This is almost certainly a data rate problem. The quality level of H.264 from a camera is much higher and much less compressed than a typical media file. H.264 is an elaborate compression which can achieve substantial compression ratios while maintaining high quality, however it is also very complex and difficult to encode with the best compression ...


3

I was in same situation when I started my project in 2014. After a lot of research i found a very good solution. I am running three projectors and one monitor on one computer so total 4 outputs i am using and it's working quite well. I am using mac pro black cylinder model and I bought resolume arena software which can play multiple videos at a time in ...


3

The Matrox graphics card is probably the easiest and most versatile approach. I use the TripleHead2Go, which as you'd assume sends a signal(s) to up to three monitors/projectors. Multiple computers will never stay in sync. I found this out the hard way the night of an event. In terms of software, if you're on OS X check out VDMX. There's a fully functional ...


3

Many different factors can contribute to stutter in video playback. It could be a CPU issue (check your CPU when playing the video) in which case, a simpler codec or a player that can leverage the graphics card for decoding would help. It could also be data rate related though. In this case, using a simpler format would actually compound the problem as ...


3

There are a few things to consider. The MP4 spec was not designed for the playback of high frame rate files, because the files are highly compressed, and limited to using a single core for decompression. Even if you had 12 cores, the file would not decompress any faster. The easiest way to solve your issue is to either encode the MP4 into another codec, or ...


3

The problems with seeking are typically in the video player and not in the videos themselves, so you may want to look at different video player. A video player should be able to seek to any frame in the video, regardless of format and the encoder settings used. It is also technically possible to play any video backwards, even though very few players support ...


3

The quality does differ. If both TVs have the same resolution and specs, the image on the bigger one will be more pixelated if viewed from the same distance. The last part of the sentence is the key. You will probably sit farther away from the 64" television. The recommended viewing distance increases proportionally in relation to the screen size (for ...


3

The orange bar is the frame indicator. In the screenshot, the playhead is displaying the last frame of your in/out range. If the playhead stopped one frame further, as you suggest, it would be showing the next frame AFTER your in/out range (and could be confusing, although obviously this method is too!).


3

As far as I am aware, there isn't a way to disable Mercury Transmit if the viewer covers the UI, unless you set up a key binding. You can assign a keyboard shortcut to the "Enable Transmit" function in the keyboard preferences (I use ctrl+shift+' as it's similar to the maximise window shortcut). You can then use this key combination to toggle the full screen ...


3

There are 2 different things: The real width and height of frames (in pixels) - see the green part of the folowing picture. The displayed width and height (during the playback) - see the blue part of the same picture. The problem arose in old bad days, when the resolution of devices (number of pixels in the image) was very low, but the required ratio of ...


3

This is what the Multi-Cam feature is for. You can see this Tutorial: How to use Multicam in Resolve in it, you can preview all cameras at once. Keep in mind that this is quite perfomance intensif. Make sure to use Proxy to improve performance.


2

Yes, that has to do with keyframes. Most players can only seek to a keyframe. Others will go to the prior keyframe and decode up to the point selected. Others will just play gibberish until the next keyframe. Having regular keyframes increases your file size, but also adds many more points a user can seek to in your video. If you are referring to how to ...


2

1st, make sure you don't have any equipment or 3rd party programs that interfere with the audio on your computer because, more often than not, it is a problem with that instead of the audio on the computer itself. I actually asked a similar question (which is specific to your question) about a third party program messing with Ableton (same as with Premiere)...


2

The K key is a modifier and stop playback key. Play in reverse To move the playhead in reverse at a normal speed, press J. To move it backwards faster, press JJ. To move backward slowly, press J and K. To move back one frame at a time, press K and tap the J key. To play in reverse slightly faster, press Shift + J. . . Play forward To move the ...


2

If you shot at 120fps, it is presumably to get a slow motion effect. So the playback actually needs to be at your normal 24/25/30 fps speed to get the effect. There is no such thing as 120 fps playback. The maximum I know of would be 60p. What do ffmpeg or mediainfo report as the frame rate for these videos. If they report 120fps or some other weird value, ...


2

As you want to play three different videos, daisy-chaining projectors or copying the signal using an amplifier is not viable. Machine While you can get one machine to play to three different projectors I think it will be quite expensive and prone to errors. Average laptops/desktops are not equipped to output a video signal to three screens. You will need ...


2

Something that isn't mentioned, but has a direct impact on performance obviously would be what effects (even fixed effects like motion & opacity) are applied on the footage while trying to cut. Other things to consider (some mentioned before, some not), in no particular order: Overall effects applied (including color correction). The number of non-...


2

If I read this right, you want to watch your 120fps videos at 0.25 their real speed, seeing every single frame but at 30fps. That's what I do (GoPro 3+, 720p, 120fps) but it's a bit involved. I use Blender video sequence editor. It's not intuitive but a good tutorial can make all the difference in the world, I learned with Mikeycal Meyers' tutorial: ...


2

I did a 3 screen art installation in a hotel lobby some years ago. The original system used media players in a rack with converters to pass DVI over cat5 cable. There was a control computer to keep the media players in sync. It was 20U of rack space, 15K of hardware and many hours of configuration and installation. It ran 24/7 for 7 years. When the media ...


2

Make sure that there isn't a misconfig of framerate between original media, sequence and export. Eg: Original 25fps, Sequence at 30fps and exported at 25fps. In this case the playback would appear faster in premiere, but ok in the exported media.


2

You don't do this in Camtasia as it doesn't appear that Camtasia supports pitch shifting at this point although there has definitely been some discussion of the topic for quite some time. There are alternate solutions however, ffmpeg has this capability through the atempo and aserate audio filters, I understand that you can do this with audacity and sox as ...


2

Since there aren't any monitors that I'm aware of that display 1000 frames per second, I assume you want to play back for viewing in realtime, but don't care about the lost data. The trick of 1000fps video is that the amount of data is pretty staggering. If the resolution is pretty limited, it might be doable on non-specialized hardware, but data rate is ...


1

I can't tell for sure from the single frame there and not knowing what the source was, but it appears that you were using an HDR video application. The result of such an application is that you get frames with two different exposure settings that are designed to be combined to form video with frames that have a higher dynamic range. If that conclusion is ...


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