8

This "effect" is called Rolling Shutter. It is common in most CMOS camera sensors because they don't capture an instantaneous image, instead they do it progressively over a period of time. CCD sensors do not have this problem as they do have instantaneous capture.


4

It is down to the raster/line speed of the CMOS array in your camera - it does not expose the whole thing at once, it scans from left to right and downwards. For even more amusement google for iPhone propellor videos, such as this one, or in fact any video of oscillating or moving objects. The solution is to get equipment with slightly more upmarket sensor ...


4

The short answer is "No." DVD by definition is limited to 720x480 video with a fairly low bitrate, compressed specifically with MPEG-2. There is absolutely no way to make your HD video look just as good with those constraints. Some DVD players do let you play .mp4, .mkv, or whatever files that happen to be stored on a DVD, but that isn't a standard ...


3

Most modern codecs will support whatever frame rate you throw at them. The choice is more of an artistic decision than a technical one. For the best quality, you should match the frame rate of your source or some even multiple there of. If you can choose on your source, then choose according to the feel you want. 24(23.976) is more "cinematic" and is ...


3

If your source footage is interlaced, deinterlace it. If your progressive frame rate is a constant 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97, or 30 fps, then keep the frame rate as it is, unless you require a very low bitrate and want to halve the frame rate. These are all widely supported frame rates, although other arbitrary frame rates below 30 fps will often work as well. ...


3

You are over thinking it. Edit a quick beep in before the audio starts on the song, play the song aloud while you are recording the drums. Hit one of your drums so that you can see and hear it quickly on the video as well. Record the audio direct from your drums and have a third track that is the microphone for the camera. The camera audio track will ...


3

Film may have better long-term archival stability. For theatrical exhibition, 35mm film still has a more uniform distribution and exhibition system outside the US and Europe. People like Chris Nolan prefer to use film because there aren't any widely-available digital processess that can do an IMAX-style presentation, with a huge negative area and screen. ...


3

The quality of the image is a big part of why film has been preferred for so long. This Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_versus_film_photography) really outlines well the technical advantages. However, you asked about favoritism between the two formats. I think another consideration is cost, familiarity, and accessibility. When I got ...


3

The cable in the picture is an analogue cable, so it's getting an analogue signal from your camera. It's just a cable, so the signal at one end is exactly(ish) the same as the other. To digitise it you'll need a device to convert the analogue signal into digital code. There is a big range of these devices, from cheap USB dongles on ebay like this to ...


3

Major cable suppliers such as Belden and GEPCO publish guides that correlate at least two factors: Signal bandwidth or SMPTE standard (standard def, HD, 3G, etc) Cable length There are three other factors that make a difference: the quality of the connectors, the quality of the physical installation of the connectors on the cables, and the quality of the ...


2

I couldn't find specific details, but it appears that ancillary data on SDI in general conforms to SMPTE 291M. I couldn't find any details about the specific implementations used for deck control. It appears like there could potentially be some variation between manufacturers or even particular decks since the ancillary space doesn't seem to be that ...


2

The processor in your camera is not the only thing you need to override for your proposal to work. Consider the focus system, the iris, and the shutter system, and their respective upper and lower performance boundaries. What you are suggesting appears to be a design up idea not an after it was built idea. In other words you need a whole team of engineers at ...


2

An XLR cable used with an adapter won't give you the audio quality that an all-XLR cable will. If audio quality is really important, I'd buy or borrow an external recorder that takes XLR cables directly. If this isn't an option, pick up an XLR to 1/8" adapter cable. I suggest taping the adapter to the camcorder so it doesn't move around much. (Mic cables ...


2

Answer 3: Use XLR cables to get the audio from the PA to your camcorder. To convert the balanced PA signal to the line signal, take a passive DI-box (aka DI-unit). They are not expensive. You'll get a solid one for less than 50$ by Amazon. More info: DI-Units - Wikipedia DI-Boxes - Amazon.com


2

You should check your recorded video with MediaInfo. Regarding your problem, it shows, if the durations of the video and the audio is the same or not, if the interleave of the audio (the starting offset) is set correctly in which sampling rate your audio was recorded. Then, I would import your video file into Audacity (which imports only the audio, of ...


2

Your best bet to easily do this is probably to set up two cameras with half the field of view being used. Then simply setup a simple project that can combine the two and encode it for electronic distribution. If you want to do an all digital route, you are still going to need to run an encoding after the fact to get the size down, so doing the combination ...


2

There are a couple ways you could go about this. If you can do it in a single take, then you can record the audio and video at the same time and then simply sync them up and all will be well in the world. If you want to be able to do multiple takes, then what you should do is do it the way they make music videos. Do the audio first, make your recording ...


2

You must use the proper formatting for it to be read by a DVD player that only reads standards compliant disks. Specifically, DVD Video disks use the UDF 1.02 format.


2

AJ Henderson and Craig have excellent answers. I'd just like to add my own knowledge about making miniatures look full-size. As far as I can tell, there are 4 factors that make a miniature look, well, miniature. 1) Lighting. If the train is supposed to look like it's outside, shoot it outside or next to a window that sun is coming through. Sunlight looks ...


2

Short answer: no. Long answer, maybe. You have very limited scripting ability via the auto update function of the camera. You simply drop a text file called "autoexec.sh" on the SD card before turning the camera on and the camera will execute the script. Though I haven't seen a script that would do something like infinite recording by erasing the oldest part ...


2

Personally I use Pinnacle Studio to record the TV shows. I have used it to record over a 100 hours of TV footage till now and I'm pretty happy with it. What You Need TV Tuner Software to record. For the card you can buy Pinnacle TV Tuner (~ $70), but any compatible card will do. Many good cards are available for a lower price. Just make sure it has a ...


2

300 Feet is about as far as you can take SDI or HD-SDI; before it needs to be reclocked. So no, 150 M is too far. Also the quality of cable; and if it's being run in parallel with other cables that cause interference can affect how long you can go. You can reclock at the half way point using a distribution amplifier, and you'll lose 1 frame of sync for ...


2

It is best to match the source dimensions with your recoding dimensions. Using a larger number of pixels requires more data or bandwidth to encode the scaled source. You wont be able to make a sharper image as there isnt any additional information being generated and in fact the scale up might make the image softer or add artifacts like aliasing.


1

Adobe Encore can do what you are looking for. It is included with Adobe Premiere. You can either buy a copy of CS6 or if you only need it for the one project, you can use Creative Cloud to obtain it for just a month or two. In general, you will find most DVD authoring software comes in fairly expensive packages. It's not as easy as you would think to do ...


1

The answer is always "More light". The higher the illumination of the sensor (within obvious limits), the less noise or grain. If you must deal only with ambient light -- you can't supplement or fill in -- then open the iris. However, in doing so you trade off depth of field, so it's a balancing act. Generally, avoid increasing preamp 'gain' to compensate ...


1

The first thing is to make sure any gain is off. Gain on a video camera is like high ISO on a digital still camera. It increases the noise floor significantly and causes much more noise in even a good image. This should make the camera make other adjustments to try to preserve the exposure with a lower noise floor. If there is still too much noise, it ...


1

The quick answer that worked for me: do NOT save your captured video to a drive on the computer, save it to an external drive that runs at 7200 RPM (many are 5400). This problem was driving me crazy. I checked so many blogs, FAQs and help lines, but nothing worked. Finally a salesman at B&H Photo in NYC pointed me in the right direction (this is ...


1

I think you should try another program first and see the result. Maybe the software is the reason or tweak the settings of yours. Also try to close any other software which is running at that time like antivirus programs etc.


1

Best way to check if it's out of sync or drifting, or both would be make a recording, clap with your hands once at the beginning and at the end. Check if the sound is earlier or later at the beginning or the end. Then to resync, use an Non Linear Editing program to align and possibly re-time the audio, retiming the video will look much worse than fixing ...


1

There are quality settings for both the audio and video recording. Have you checked out the video capture settings? Maybe some adjustment here would get the audio and video back in sync. The picture is from this Dell support site. May be some more useful info there. Also, just in general (sorry if it's obvious) are you sure your drivers for the webcam ...


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