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7

A normal film camera has a mechanism for stopping the film in the gate every frame while the shutter is open, then when the shutter closes pulling down the next frame, stopping it, exposing it, and so on. If the film isn't perfectly still while the shutter is open the image will be blurred. To do this with high speed film is impractical, the forces involved ...


6

You will generally get the following guidance if you take courses on presentation skills (this list from write-out-loud.com) Slow speech is usually regarded as less than 110 wpm, or words per minute. Conversational speech generally falls between 120 wpm at the slow end, to 150 - 200 wpm in the fast range. People who read books for radio or podcasts are ...


6

Do you realize people go through years of academical studies or expensive courses at private universities to learn all that? It's certainly not something you're going to master by watching a few Youtube videos ... If you want to seriously get into film making, I would suggest you take a course. Not necessarily a full blown film studies degree, but you could ...


6

Regardless of format; 16, 35, 65, etc... The studios would distrubute release prints. The prints were shipped (speaking about 35mm here) on 2000' reels; 5 reels to a can. In the olden day's they would use two projectors and the projectionist would have to literally load reel one, and two to the other, and they would switch over. Back and forth. A typical ...


6

Well there's a number of factors that come into play, but first and foremost, the reason a camera operator pulls focus (if shooting alone) or having a 1st AC/2nd AC pull focus is because if you care about what you're shooting, you want focus to be tack sharp. Focus pulling is required on today's full frame and large sensor cameras because the Hyperfocal is ...


5

This requires a repetitive motion and good lighting. You expose the position of the droplet on successive oscillation, but capture it at a slightly different spot on each. Thinking about it from the perspective of a ball bouncing. On the first photo, I take a quick photo of the ball on the ground. The ball bounces up and then back down. I then take a ...


5

@Martin A provided an very in-depth answer, but I feel that it's worth noting one more thing: focus is part of the creative toolbox that filmakers use. Pulling focus from one actor to another in a 2 shot can be used to emphasise a reaction, or it can be used to reveal foreground or backgrounds, or pick out a subject from a crowd. Autofocus is not always able ...


5

It's generally preferred to use the actual dialog audio from the take. It matches the movement of the lips, it sounds right for the environment, the actor is giving an authentic performance, etc. And, you don't have to pay the actor to come back for an extra day re-recording audio in a rented sound booth. "Looping" in audio after a scene is shot is ...


4

Remember its all about the story. How to tell the story. And the tools you use to tell it. Editing, lighting, special effects and sound (are the tools used to tell your story.) Remember: story, story, story. Starting out: A good entry level camera to start filming with by Tom Antos. (Note: The Sony Nex-5 is discontinued,...


4

When I was first looking for a good portable camera, the LX100 was on the top of the list. When looking at research, the LX100 provides great IQ (at 4k) in a good compact device for the price. If you have not already looked at these sites, I would suggest looking up TheCameraStore review on YouTube, CameraLabs, Dpreview, and EOSHD. LX100 does also have ...


4

For the three main rotations of the camera you have pan (rotation around the vertical axis), tilt (rotation around the axis passing left to right through the camera), roll (rotation through the axis passing through the center of the lens). Then there are the three main movements along those same axis. Pedestal is a movement along the vertical axis. ...


4

I hate to burst your bubble, but if you are expecting video to be a similar level of intrusiveness to photography, you are almost certainly mistaken. Video is a much more work intensive process as it requires constant attention to make sure you are getting smooth usable shots instead of the occasional random thought that "I'd like a photo of this." It is ...


4

Is this an impression you have or based on statistics you read? My impression is the opposite: projects shot on film have become so noteworthy they get some press coverage for the fact alone they are shot on film. Then you have things like "interstellar" where the hype was about the 70mm or tarantino who says movies on digital are not sexy. What I heard is ...


4

This is a tough question because there are a ton of different factors involved here, from complexity of the video to the equipment you're working with to the NLE you use. However, the default formula we use to give time estimates to clients breaks down like this (I've run a small video production company for a few years working for a large variety and ...


4

You can tell by the shadows that light's illumination was increased. However, you can acheive a similar result (though not perfect) by just keyframing the 'Curves' effect in After Effects. (I had better results with 'Curves' as opposed to 'Levels') See below: The curves were keyframed from default to: The top point is to blow out the whites, the middle ...


4

Ever see the credit for "focus puller" in a film's credits? That's a single person's job, just to keep the camera focus where it should be on a moving shot (or even for changing the focus point at the right time in an otherwise static shot). Usually the shot would be blocked out before hand, and they would work out exactly where the object of focus is going ...


4

There's a few options I've seen listed at https://sites.google.com/view/aiupscalingtutorials/ai-upscaling: 1. ESRGAN An open source AI upscaler (super sampler) based on a generative adversarial network architecture. Can be run in CPU mode, but requires a CUDA enabled Nvidia graphics card to get the most out of it. 2. SFTGAN An open source image enhancer ...


3

The quality of the image is a big part of why film has been preferred for so long. This Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_versus_film_photography) really outlines well the technical advantages. However, you asked about favoritism between the two formats. I think another consideration is cost, familiarity, and accessibility. When I got ...


3

You could simplify your costs and needs with this approach to your kit: Get a similar unit to the Alesis PalmTrack to record your audio, preferably on 2 channels, or as a pair of Left and Right inputs from suitable microphones. Monitor your Left & Right balance with suitable headphones to ensure the usual clean, distortion free audio. Later, you could ...


3

Film may have better long-term archival stability. For theatrical exhibition, 35mm film still has a more uniform distribution and exhibition system outside the US and Europe. People like Chris Nolan prefer to use film because there aren't any widely-available digital processess that can do an IMAX-style presentation, with a huge negative area and screen. ...


3

If you feel comfortable with learning from good Youtube resources, here's some channels that have tons of material to answer your questions: https://www.youtube.com/user/filmriot https://www.youtube.com/user/everyframeapainting https://www.youtube.com/user/D4Darious https://www.youtube.com/user/DSLRguide (even better: His Blog http://dslrguide.tv/blog/)


3

What you're seeing is an inherent problem with sensors that use "rolling shutter". There are tradeoffs in sensor technology among speed, sensitivity, and size, and using a sequential line readout with continuous exposure is a popular choice that's a good compromise for many situations. Unfortunately yours isn't one of those. What you need is what's known as ...


3

With an A7S, MkI or MkII; the camera is ridiculously incredible in terms of noise hint even at extreme ISOs; that's compared to just a few years ago when everyone was shooting on the 5D MkII. My recommendation BECAUSE it's the A7s and because the visually acceptable level of noise to the viewer is really not noticed until you go into the extreme ISOs; ...


3

Although it looks like a slit-scan effect similar to the Tom Baker era Dr. Who titles, in this case, the effect was very simply made with mylar - a reflective plastic. Due to time and budget constraints, there wasn't much they could do, so they made a tunnel out of mylar and flew the camera through it. They apparently had a lot of mylar left from making ...


3

A high shutter speed can make individual frames look more crisp but make large motion look like it is stuttering. e.g. fast panning looks like it is flickering or jumping A low shutter speed can make individual frames look blurred and make the motion look smooth.


3

I'm not able to state a conclusive definition for "visual grammar", but I'd say camera settings have a quite relevant role on building it. Depth of field (aperture) is crucial for focusing on a subject; ISO may be used for obtaining a noisy image which can be used to say something (to look like an amateur, or a security camera, for instance); WB ...


2

Regarding @rich's suggestion... if you don't have Quicktime, will iMovie work instead? Or some other program? Create your Keynote presentation. Record your speaking part (separately) with an audio recording program. I recommend Audacity. It's a great free application. You can download Audacity from www.sorceforge.com among other places. You'll also want to ...


2

Don't shoot handheld and don't use a phone. Baring that, use stabilization such as a steadicam or steadicam jr (if using a tripod really isn't an option), use lots of well controlled lighting (phone cameras suck at low light) and plan your shots out very carefully. Use external audio recording rather than the phone's built in mic and do a lot of grading ...


2

Well, its a bit of a generic question. Almost like asking how to take a movie like shot using your camera. The answer is equally generic. Lighting, to prevent blowout or shadows take the shot when its cloudy, or near sunrise or sunset. (Unless you wanted a grunge harsh hot feel and maybe over exposed is the effect you are after, so take it at noon). Make ...


2

Find some people IRL who share your interest and enthusiasm for filmmaking. They don't have to be professionals, and you don't have to pay for a fancy film school, but opening a discussion with real people about technique is the best way to start learning. Watch movies with these people, press the pause button when something grabs your attention, and talk ...


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