18

A really good program you can use is Handbrake. It's a very popular program among so called "pirates" because it's really good at getting a high quality even at tiny file sizes. And this is with good reason, because the main purpose of Handbrake is, indeed, to make the movies small with high quality. Personally I use it when I distribute my short movies on ...


11

Let me explain you from scratch. MOV, MP4, AVI, MKV etc all these are just containers, It is just kind of wrapper which contains audio, video, text, metadata file together as one file. It does not play a big role in the size of a file. Size of the file heavily depends on audio and video codec and bit-rate of that audio video codecs. So there is a ...


9

The export settings you are using in Final Cut Pro X are preset Compressor settings and the export itself is actually using the Compressor engine (but with no user control). Compressor allows you control over those settings and to save your own custom presets. For instance, you may want to export an MPEG2 file with a particular bitrate, letterbox 16:9 ...


7

What is your definition of huge and what is your definition of high quality? Size is directly related to compression and compression is directly inversely related to quality for the most part. Some amount of compression can be had for free using lossless compression or near free with more efficient pattern finding for lossy compression, but for the most ...


7

Technically lossless, or real lossless, means that when the output is decoded by a conformant decoder, the result is mathematically identical to the input. Visually lossless is a non-rigorous term that indicates subjective transparency i.e. output which to the lay human eye looks indistinguishable from the original. The output may look different if a viewer ...


6

I've answered a similar question some time ago. YouTube added a few codecs since then but all the info there still applys: How does YouTube encode my uploads and what codec should I use to upload? Short answer: Yes if you are concerned about maximum quality a lossless codec or visually lossless codec is the way to go. Re-encoding always means loss of ...


6

You are using the same bitrate for each video. The bitrate determines how much data is used per second. The resolution has nothing to do with how much data is used, it only impacts the number of points of data which are encoded (and thus determines part of the quality of the video output for a given bitrate). What you end up with is a lower resolution ...


6

Well going by the numbers h264 has a lesser bit-depth and color accuracy than ProRes 422. PR422 has 10bit and 4:2:2 chroma sub-sampling, h264 has 8bit and 4:2:0 unless you encode in the Hi422P Intra profile which isn't very well supported in the wild but offers 10bit and 4:2:2. So in that case I don't think you will have any difference what so ever between ...


5

What you are missing is that not every frame is stored as a picture. A large number of frames are stored simply by keeping track of what changed from the previous picture. If you think about most video, not a whole lot is actually changing since the majority of the scene stays the same or moves in a similar pattern. By describing only the changes, the ...


5

The key is to dial in the bitrate - you'll need about 800kbps video with 100kbps audio to hit 200MB. That's low for for SD resolution, but it might be good enough for you. Also look for software that has an option for 2-pass encoding. Try Expression Encoder, Adobe Media Encoder, or Sorenson Squeeze.


5

Has anyone done or seen any tests comparing Apple ProRes 422 with high-bitrate H.264? No, but I can tell you that x264 can get as close to lossless as you want (or even mathematically lossless, with -qp 0). x264 can produce h.264 streams in 4:2:0, 4:2:2, or 4:4:4 YUV colorspaces, at 8 or 10 bits per component. (It can also do RGB, but unless you're doing ...


5

Youtube generally reencodes all videos you upload to youtube to ensure compatibility across various platforms and to provide smaller versions of the videos for users with slow internet connections. So yes, both the video and the audio stream of your video file will be compressed and reencoded when you upload it. If someone uses a third party tool to download ...


5

As you are hardcoding subtitles, the video (with the subtitles added) will be re-encoded. You can use the CRF rate control method to modulate the quality of the output. So, start with ffmpeg -i grdedFinal.mov -vf subtitles=portSbs.srt -crf 18 -c:a copy gradedFinalwithSubs.mov If the quality's not acceptable, lower that value till it is - in exchange for ...


4

First we need a primer on I, P and B frames. An I frame is a frame that is a completely independant picture of the frame. It doesn't depend on any other frames and is a frame which B and P frames are based on. A P frame stores only the changes from the previous frame and a B frame stores only the changes in either direction. IPB uses a mix of all 3 frame ...


4

x264 is the best-in-class encoder for generating H.264 video streams and you can use it via ffmpeg, a command-line tool, to encode to a small-sized file. Get a binary from here - opt for the latest nightly/snapshot release - and run ffmpeg -i input.mov -c:v libx264 -crf 23 output.mov The output will be the same constant frame rate as the input but x264 is ...


4

I don't agree that the other answer is a good idea in general, because "-vf yadif" will drop half the frames, thus resulting in a poor substitute of the original footage. Here is the thing: 576i25 means that you have 50 interlaced fields per second, rendering motion of objects fluid and natural to the human eye. You can get a high speed video at 50 frames ...


4

This is an interesting question, but I don't think that you will find a good solution without changing your inputs (the video elements you are using). I'm not aware of any software that allows you to prioritize compression by area. The compressor itself usually makes all these kinds of decisions for you. Aside from that, you said the magic (not good) word ...


4

This is actually a collateral effect of the concept of rolling shutter. Most video devices do not expose all the frame area at once. They expose starting from one side and (up or down) and move from there. (The example has the camera rotated 90° so the effect is on the sides of the frame). This can be either a mechanical element that moves or rotates or an ...


4

Adobe licenses its H.264 encoder from Mainconcept, which doesn't do that well at low bitrates. x264 is pretty much the frontier when it comes at low size output for a given quality target, or quality for a given bitrate target. x264 is what's used by platforms like Youtube / Vimeo ..etc to encode user videos. One thing you could try is to increase the ...


3

Unacceptable is in the eye of the watcher, so that part is tough to answer. Distinguishable is easier: yes, there will be a difference. It will not be obvious in every frame or circumstance, but it will be there. If you simply truncate the lowest bit, it will raise the noise floor and the effect will be most evident in low light areas. So, it will look ...


3

Can you provide more details about the source format, as in resolution, video & audio codec details etc? My stock answer is to use ffmpeg with Avanti for the frontend. A starter tutorial is here


3

I assume the actual data rate is 3.3 Mb/s, not MB/s (bits, not bytes). This is very low for 1080p60, and artifacts are likely at such a low rate. You might consider capturing at at least double that rate. Alternatively (or also), halving the frame rate to 29.97 would double the effective bit rate. You would be trading some motion artifacting for less ...


3

H264 is actually a pretty good codec for such content. Its based on motion vectors and you can define in which intervals the codec should encode a full frame, everything in between will be based on the last and next keyframe (simplifying here). x264 is probably the best h264 encoder out there and luckily open source. Probably the best way to use it is ...


3

Any decent encoder can hit a target bitrate (with 2pass), but still spend the bits intelligently to achieve similar quality throughout the file. x264 2pass figures out what CRF will give the desired bitrate (pass1), and then uses it (pass2). (source: Dark Shikari. cf. the links I dug up for my answer on this question about VBR streaming). You only get ...


3

As you say, noise by definition doesn't compress well. You can try different types of noise in FCP. The Add Noise filter has several choices - Gaussian is a reasonable simulation of film grain, but you can try the other choices, too. They might compress better (or worse). But your best bet is to increase the data rate of the resulting file. I don't know ...


3

I read up a bit and made some experiments with lossless codecs, getting decent results. I'd be interested in comments on this, especially if there are lossless or lossy alternatives that I overlooked. I tried the following codecs / formats in ffmpeg: Lossless Motion JPEG2000 / AVI ffmpeg -i test.avi -vcodec jpeg2000 -strict -2 -pred 1 test_jpeg2000.avi ...


3

I recommend not to host the video files on your web server, but to upload them to YouTube and only embed the YouTube link on your web page. You can even define that your videos won't show up on searches, but are only served when using the link (from your website). The reason is that these videos add significant load to your web server and bandwidth. And if ...


3

You need to change the encoding settings. By default, AE uses the AVI animation codec, which is very good at retaining quality but creates incredibly large files. Using an intermediary codec like Apple Prores, Avid DNxHR, or GrassValley HQx would give you visually equivalent quality with a significantly smaller file size. If that file size isn't small ...


3

There are a few video quality metrics available for you to use, primarily SSIM and also PSNR. You can use ffmpeg to convert the video and then compare the output. Step 1 Convert the video ffmpeg -i actioncamfile -c:v libx264 -crf 23 -c:a copy -map 0 compressed.mp4 The CRF value modulates the quality. Lower values produce better quality but larger file ...


3

You can use ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, to do this: Without letterboxing, NTSC wide pixel-aspect ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf "scale=720x480,setdar=16/9" -r 30000/1001 -c:v libx264 -crf 20 -c:a aac -movflags +faststart output.mp4 With letterboxing, NTSC 4:3 pixel-aspect ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf "pad=1920:1440:0:180,scale=720x480,setdar=4/3" -r 30000/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible