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8

Those are interlacing artifacts. They become visible when the motion in the video is faster than the field rate, so that when both fields are combined into a progressive scan image, the movement is visible in a single frame. They can be removed with a de-interlace filter. I've never personally used one with Virtualdub, but several are available: MSU Smart ...


7

The tee muxer is suitable for this. ffmpeg \ -f v4l2 -standard PAL -thread_queue_size 2048 -i /dev/video1 \ -f alsa -thread_queue_size 2048 -i hw:2,0 \ -map 0 -map 1 \ -vf yadif=1 \ -vcodec libx264 -preset superfast -crf 23 -flags +global_header \ -acodec libmp3lame -b:a 128k -ac 2 -ar 48000 \ -f tee "vhs_output.mov|[f=nut:onfail=ignore]pipe:1" | ffplay -


6

In helical-scan video players, the tape is wrapped around a rotating drum that has one or more magnetic pickups (heads) that are the width of a track and angled slightly from true horizontal. Each track is several inches long and laid down diagonally at (roughly) the same angle as the head is tilted. (The angles differ because the relative motion of the tape ...


5

You can't improve the quality of a bad recording. Especially if it is because the tape stock is flaking off oxide or is stretched, both of which are common problems with older tape stock. No matter what tape format you transfer it to, it will likely just get worse. You might get about the same quality by digitizing with your capture card. However, you will ...


4

The answer is probably no, unless the SCART socket on your VCR is labeled specifically as "S-VIDEO". The fact that SCART connector has S-Video pins does not guarantee that your VCR provides S-Video signal to these pins. A low-end model will simply transmit a composite signal over the luminance S-Video pin and nothing over the chrominance pin. Even ...


3

This is a difficult question to accurately answer; because you haven't detailed out the exact setup of how the tapes are being duplicated. First, VHS is an Analog format, and the video signal is typically output via a composite connection. Some higher end VHS consumer units did have component out, either by RGB or via S-Video Out. This connector would ...


3

Audio drift can have a couple of causes, dropped frames (which a TBC can help with), and unstable clocks, where the audio isn't recorded at quite the precise rate it should be, causing drift, as Michael correctly pointed out. Dropped frames caused by tape dropouts are a problem if the device skips a frame, without skipping the corresponding frame of audio. A ...


2

It could be overtightened, some cheap VCRs tend to brake badly when spooling, this can apply undue tension on the reel. You actually can dismantle a tape cassette (to fix twists etc.) and pull the spools out. As long as you don't mind loosing it altogether (which you have anyway). Remember to place all the little capstans (silver guides) and springs back in ...


2

27-years old?! Forget it. Tapes need to be regularly forwarded and rewound, fully, for them not to stick. If that tape of yours remained unused for so many years, it might be too late. Talk to a transfer pro... but don't expect miracles.


2

So, I posted these images to Reddit under /r/whatisthisthing, and the answer that came back was obvious once it was offered: Someone has taken a normal tape apart and re-assembled it with the take up spool upside-down. It can't be a cleaning tape because it will not engage with the take up spool drive. A machine might just spit it back out but it could slam ...


2

I did this a few years ago, digitized dozens of my family's old home videos. The way I did it was, as at the time I was doing it from home and didn't have a IO device such as a DeckLink, I simply used a MiniDV Portable Recorder I got off eBay; which allows composite, component, and S-Video In. Once the VHS tapes were transferred to my "Digital ...


2

The answer to this question will depend on your priorities to some extent — what sort of quality are you looking for in the transfer, how important the content of the tapes are to you / the world, what sort of budget you have, how much time you want to spend on the project — as well as other variables such as what condition are the tapes are in, and whether ...


2

Yes, using the S-Video output of the SCART breakout will give you better quality than if you use the composite output of the same breakout. (You can get even better quality if you use a different SCART breakout that has RGB outputs.) NTSC and PAL composite signals sacrifice the amount of data about the brightness and color of the scene for the sake of ...


2

The UK PAL VHS tapes will play back in a German PAL deck. The actual method of audio recording is not related to the PAL specification. VHS records up to two linear audio tracks. HiFi capable decks record additional two HiFi tracks that are multiplexed with the video signal. I don't remember the details. A non-HiFi deck will ignore the HiFi tracks and use ...


2

No, a TBC won't solve an audio-video sync problem. Most likely the sync problem is coming from a shortcut in the capture device or driver that samples the audio and video with separate and/or unstable clocks. A TBC built into a "prosumer" VTR like the one in your link will give you slightly better video quality. So would using the S-Video out ...


2

Replicating an accurate VHS-look is a complicated profession, but if you are not worried about the technical accuracy you could emulate it like this: Create a solid called "Displace-Map" Apply turbulent noise to it set the scaling to something huge in the x-axis and something reasonable (100%) on the y-axis. alt-click the stopwatch on "...


1

Neat Video has been working miracles on footage for us so far, you can give the trial a go! We've never tried it on this specific artifact (that I know of) but it does have features for restoration/archival type damage, and I highly recommend it.


1

Do you have a manual for the VCR? Does it show the pin mappings for the SCART connector? I did a quick search, I can't find a manual online. Where did you get your SCART cable? Did it come with the VCR? I'd agree with the link you posted - SCART more commonly connects to a composite signal, or sometimes RGB. All my SCART cables are wired for either to those,...


1

Component Y/Pb/Pr is better than both S-video and composite. It supports higher resolution, and progressive scan (480p,720p,1080p). The Y is luminance and sync signaling, the Pb is blue minus, and the Pr is red minus. Since its progressive, it uses more bandwidth than the former's. It's easy to get "component" mixed up for "composite"/&...


1

Either remove the -copyts or switch -t 06:00 to -vframes 9000


1

It depends. My setup is kind of peculiar, but works extremely well. Regular (decent, but consumer) VHS deck. SCART2HDMI box. The neat thing about these, is that they usually include a Time Base Corrector (TBC) and thus are much better than the regular USB dongles. Then, I used a cheap HDMI capture card for about $15 which takes the HDMI. It captures in ...


1

I think you want to capture at 640x480. VHS uses interlaced video, so the recorded content provides half the lines every 1/30th of a second. The effective resolution is horribly low, 352x240. Have a look at VHS capture DIVX information, which seems to discuss all the issues. Regardless of the workflow you use, be sure your de-interlacer is high-quality or ...


1

If you are using old VHS player, then its head can be dirty Also VHS cassettes' tape can be dirty, but how I understand you using new cassettes. So, try to connect your VHS player to TV. If signal will be the same, you need to locate that thing: And clean it and head (black thing on background to the left) You can do it by yourself or maybe there still ...


1

As other answers have suggested, you're probably wasting your time. The tape is likely stuck to itself and will be damaged if you pull it apart, but maybe something can be done. Since you have effectively lost that part of the tape, and you've already transferred what you can, there is nothing left to lose. I would open the cassette very carefully as ...


1

The problem is probably not WMP but the Microsoft MPEG-1 codec. The straight forward solution other than using a decent player is to use a better codec pack - ffdshow, it feeds WMP through the operating system level. Besides the seek issue you'll probably get better playback performance, and it doesn't require any end-user involvement - they continue to use ...


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