5

Some Broadcasters require a Harding Test which is patented and proprietary, it creates a Certificate; thus getting someone to accept liability isn't going to be free. You can find a number of places online that will test a video file (or Game, Poster, Art, etc.) but those aren't free, the Harding website has authenticated tests and support. Free software ...


4

ABC, NBC, Comcast and others all have their own specs. What I've found is that 1080 progressive MP4 (h.264) at 29.97 fps (some rare cases need 59.94), with audio between 192-256 Kbps, usually does the trick. You'd obviously edit in ProRes, but to submit that codec to the stations is overkill. Some outlets will even reject specs that don't conform exactly to ...


4

I wrote an ffmpeg filter which attempts to do this. It's not perfect, but it does seem to work well with a good part of the test samples I was working with. It has now been included into ffmpeg, and should be available in the next release. With mpv, you can enable it with: mpv video.mp4 --vf=photosensitivity The filter can be made more or less strict by ...


3

Getting a file format that works for everyone is very complicated. However, if you are are trying for network news, it is safe to use MPEG-2 TS 1080i29.97 (CBS, NBC, CNN) or 720p59.94 (ABC, Fox) at CBR 50Mbps, 15/3 closed GOP. Audio should be 48kHz PCM. Local stations will accept MP4s, but you likely won't be happy with the results once it gets to air. The ...


2

This depends entirely on who you are delivering to. Different broadcasters have different requirements. Most have a delivery spec sheet that you can request, or that they publish online. e.g. here's the BBC one.


2

Connection Speed For H.264 1080p30 streaming with typical compression (6 Mbps), I would recommend an Internet upload speed of around 10 Mbps minimum. Hardware OBS Studio suggests the following system requirements: AMD FX series or Intel i5 2000-series processor (dual or 4-core preferable) or higher. At least 4 GB of RAM (recommended, but not necessary). ...


2

As for how to work... it all depends on what your final destination is. Are you working on a piece to be broadcasted, or for the Web? In the latter case, the final product should be progressive. If the former... the in turn it depends on your source material, which seems to be interlaced. So you should: Create an interlaced project, "1080i50". The "50", in ...


2

There are three different things that get called "broadcast safe": Colors gamut: You don't need to apply an NTSC broadcast safe filter, but you do want to make sure that your colors are all within gamut for the format you are using. If you use out of gamut colors, most of the time nothing happens. However, you run the risk of some very odd, very hard to ...


2

Depends on who you ask. Old traditional people who grew up back in the bad old analog days have the Safe Action Area and Safe Title Area embedded in their brains. But even as old analog TV receivers evolved, there was less and less danger of losing the periphery of the frame to overscan. With modern LCD, LED, plasma, whatever, TV screens, there is ZERO ...


2

In general loudness correction is a two step process. (There's a little more to it for full EBU R128 compliance, but I work exclusively in the US and this all that is required for A/85 / CALM Act compliance.) Measure the long term/infinite loudness of the asset. Shift the level of the asset by the difference between the measured loudness and the target. ...


2

Unfortunately, I don't know of any free software that checks for PSE. As of 2013, the test for PSE was only available closed source. However, all of the major commercial QC tools can check for it. (You would need to check with each vendor if it is supported for all of the codecs you need to QC.) Interra Baton Tektronix Aurora Telestream Vidchecker Venera ...


1

Cheapest solution: OBS for broadcasting, mplayer for video playback, someone who will programm simple schedule for $100. If you don't need exact schedule programming, you can just make playlists playback for free! Here no instruction how to setup it for your needs, but if you is advanced user, you can do everything youself. If you need advert breaks, logo ...


1

You probably want Aspera Connect, not the client, which you should be able to download without a password. Additionally, your customer should be able to supply you with the Connect installer that matches their server.


1

Audition has a couple of tools that lets you measure loudness. There's the Amplitude Analysis window that lets you scan a whole mix or sound file, and tells you the LUFS loudness (which is the same as LKFS, aparently): There's also the "Loudness Radar" that has a sexy GUI, but seems to only scan in real time (though I might be using it wrong). If you use ...


1

Yes, you can broadcast more than one program service (channel) from a single location. This is fairly common. For analog over the air (NTSC), you can use combiners and a broadband antenna. (See, for example, Whitaker & Benson, 2000 chs. 15 & 16)* For any of the digital over the air or satellite delivery standards, multiplexing is part of the ...


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