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6

This is possible with the FFmpeg command ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -ss 0 -c copy -t 60 output.mp4. This would cut the video from the beginning -ss 0 to second 60 -t 60. Be aware that -ss is and offset which -t is based upon. So -ss 10 and -t 60 would result in cutting to second 70 and removing the first 10. You can use the -to option to cut at a fixed time ...


5

I found a way to resolve this jittering issue. The root cause is that mpeg file doesn't have full PTS info. There's a closed ticket of FFmpeg talking about exactly this problem: FFmpeg ticket #974 In order to solve this problem, add -fflags +genpts before the input file. Here is a sample FFmpeg command: ffmpeg -fflags +genpts -i /Users/yusizhang/Movies/...


4

MPEG-2 doesn't seem to be an officially sanctioned codec for the Quicktime container. The official specification has a section related to MPEG-1 in MOV but not MPEG-2. The US Library of Congress also does not have an entry for the subtype MPEG-2 in MOV, like it does for MPEG-1 (just called QTV_MPEG). So, there's no official word on "allowable alternative ...


3

Strictly speaking, fourcc is the codec ID used by Microsoft. It has been adapted for use with many other formats, thus making it seem like a standardized ID format, but it's not. ffmpeg, in particular, seems to only consider XDCAM standard MPEG2 for inclusion in MOV. From the source code: else if (track->enc->codec_id == AV_CODEC_ID_MPEG2VIDEO) ...


3

I make similar videos for our corporate reception, interstate and overseas offices, events, conferences and presentations etc. The answer is to look outside the video file itself and focus on the application that is playing the file - you want the application to loop the video file playback. An alternative approach that works on some devices is to embed the ...


3

You can use tsMuxer to add the audio stream from one .ts file into the .ts file containing the video or vice versa. This is called muxing and doesn't affect the quality of the audio or video in any way.


3

As Professor Sparkles has correctly pointed out (I've just checked and confirm) — the MediaInfo tool can extract some metadata from these files. Here is a sample output from one of mine: General Complete name : /Volumes/CAM_SD/PRIVATE/AVCHD/BDMV/CLIPINF/00119.CPI Format : Blu-ray Clip info File ...


3

Yes, it is generally possible, but with a few limitations. h.264 uses what is known as a group of pictures. A group of pictures groups multiple frames together in a way that allows for further compression, but the entire group of pictures has to be decoded together. As such, it is only possible to cut a video stream in between groups of pictures. This is ...


2

This is available on the page you linked to directly. Look under the Configuration Files section. Relevant details from the page: A file "-conf" file. [ID] # The ID of the representation type=T # T can be "audio" or "video" width=W # if type is "video", # W is the width of the representation height=H # if type is "video", ...


2

Sounds like thoses apps aren't respecting the Pixel Aspect Ratio (PAR) flag. Widescreen DVD movies aren't usually made of more pixels, they have a setting in the metadata telling the player to stretch the pixels from squares into rectangles to make the picture look right. VLC is reading the PAR flag and playing the pixels back in their correct aspect ratio....


2

Try those calculators, they should do the trick. http://www.digitalrebellion.com/webapps/videocalc


2

As @LordNeckbeard wrote in the comments, moving the -t flag to after the -i flag works: ffmpeg -ss 0 -i in.mp4 -t 00:30:00 -acodec copy -vcodec copy out.mp4


2

Yes, MPEG-2 video is stored as YCbCr, but video editing programs (like Cinelerra) convert the samples to RGB for processing during editing. That range is 16-235. From Wikipedia on YCbCr Analog YPbPr from analog R'G'B' is derived as follows: To get a YUV output in the 16-235 range, the input RGB is also limited.


2

You will need to work within the title safe areas when burning to DVD as depending on what the final player will be, there might be overscan which will/can crop anything out that is not within this field. as for the pixel things, I'm not to sure.


2

Unless you know you have a specific need to preserve timestamps, there's no need to use -copyts. MPEG-TS, being a format, used for remote viewing, will have some start time offset, by default, to allow for buffering at the player's side. MP4 for local playback, doesn't need that, copyts will preserve it.


2

FFmpeg will, by default, remove the starting offset. To preserve it, add -copyts. The description of -vsync 0 isn't accurate and was written 8+ years ago: Each frame is passed with its timestamp from the demuxer to the muxer.. Video sync takes effect only once the frame has exited the decoder(+filtergraph) pipeline. But you should keep it to avoid dropping/...


2

For non-conventional layouts, the native AAC encoder writes a PCE section in the bitstream header as part of the AudioSpecificConfig. However, it does so only at the beginning, therefore subsequent files have AAC streams with this missing. Workaround is to change to a different packetization scheme for AAC in MPEG-TS. Add -hls_ts_options mpegts_flags=...


1

Until very recently (2018-02-17), ffmpeg wasn't able to correctly remux pcm_dvd streams in MPEG-PS. You'll have to upgrade to a recent version. Get a git snapshot binary from FFmpeg (under More Downloading Options) You can also just re-encode using -acodec pcm_s16be


1

It's worth a try using the concat demuxer. First, create a text file like this: file 'motor_animate_000.gif' file 'motor_animate_001.gif' file 'motor_animate_002.gif' file 'motor_animate_003.gif' ... Then run ffmpeg -f concat -i list.txt motor.mpg Do note that by just specifying a .MPG filename as output parameter, ffmpeg will encode to MPEG-1 at a ...


1

Private options are switches/flags only applicable to specific encoders or decoders, and ignored by anything else. To see the available private options for an encoder, use avconv -h encoder=name e.g. avconv -h encoder=flv For LibAV, these are the private options available for the MPEG-1 & 2 encoders. { "mpv_flags", "Flags common for all mpegvideo-...


1

If it's just a matter of which FOURCC to assign, and not the codec, then choose MP4V since it has broader compatibility, and the tag can always be changed later, using a tool like ffmpeg i.e. ffmpeg -i input.avi -c copy -map 0 -vtag DX50 tagged.avi


1

Depending on the container format, multi-channel audio can either be in a single stream or in separate mono streams. Most consumer formats allow both, but it's easier for the end-user to have it in one stream (it can be interleaved PCM audio, or encoded bit-streams as ac3 or aac). Notice that it doesn't prevent to have several multi-channel streams in one ...


1

If you have the option to embed the video in a simple webpage you could use the HTML5 video player loop option: <video loop="loop"></video>


1

You could use something like the raspberry pi zero for this. https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-zero/ It costs £4 and has an HDMI Output that feeds into most TVs. Using https://osmc.tv/ (formerly raspbmc) you could loop a video file forever and have it boot automatically when it powers up


1

After some deep Googling, I did find explanations for a few of these options: MPEG macroblock quantization level. Valid values are from 2 to 31. Low values of this variable mean higher quality and higher bitrate, so 2 is the highest quality and 31 is the lowest quality. VBV buffer size in units of 16k bits. The meaning of this parameter is ...


1

Export it from any transcoding software to a frame by frame format such as motion JPEG or an actual image sequence.


1

Do you have a m3u8 file? If so, I assume you can just do ffmpeg -i indexfile.m3u8 -acodec copy -vcodec copy output.ts You could also convert it directly into the mp4 container: ffmpeg -i indexfile.m3u8 -acodec copy -vcodec copy output.mp4


1

Either After Effects or Premiere will do this for you no problem. I'd probably use After Effects for simplicity since it is easier to understand the layers there. Either use a text effect or use Illustrator to make the text a bit nicer and import it in as a layer in After Effects. Position the video that it is playing over as the bottom layer then import ...


1

tsMuxer should be capable of doing just that. It can handle pretty much any form of transport stream.


1

Adobe Media Server appears to support the functionality you are looking for. There is a free starter edition or the Extended or Professional editions also support live stream splitting.


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