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4

ABC, NBC, Comcast and others all have their own specs. What I've found is that 1080 progressive MP4 (h.264) at 29.97 fps (some rare cases need 59.94), with audio between 192-256 Kbps, usually does the trick. You'd obviously edit in ProRes, but to submit that codec to the stations is overkill. Some outlets will even reject specs that don't conform exactly to ...


3

Figured it out. Go to "render" and under "destination" select "audio only". Choose a profile and tinker the settings. If you want to export in an undefined format, such as FLAC, you can create new profile. Go to "render", under "destination" select "audio only" and click on "create new profile". You will now use this as parameters: f=flac acodec=flac ...


3

You will want to use the H.264 codec, as it has one of the best quality/filesize-ratios of all the codecs out there. For this codec, your file size (and consequently it's quality) is mainly determined by the bitrate settings. Let's do the math: 40 min = 2400 sec 400 MB = 3200 Mb (Megabit) 3200 Mb / 2400 sec = **1.33 Mb/s** So you can set your Maximum ...


3

Getting a file format that works for everyone is very complicated. However, if you are are trying for network news, it is safe to use MPEG-2 TS 1080i29.97 (CBS, NBC, CNN) or 720p59.94 (ABC, Fox) at CBR 50Mbps, 15/3 closed GOP. Audio should be 48kHz PCM. Local stations will accept MP4s, but you likely won't be happy with the results once it gets to air. The ...


2

Export to 30p. 29.97 to be exact if there is the option. Exporting at 60fps is only going to bloat the file size (twice as many frames) per second-- if it's 60p and not 60i of data to encode. Secondly, viewers are akin to watching media playback in or around the 24-30fps range. It's what our eyes are used to, so your viewers wont be distracted as to why ...


2

How can a keyframe occur at 1252.57 for a clip that has a duration of 766 frames? Because the user could have used a clip that was longer than 1252 frames, set a keyframe, then trimmed the clip down to 766 frames. If the user later decides to make the clip longer again by changing the out point to a later time, the keyframe will still be in the place they ...


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Are you exporting to h.264? Try rendering to a master file in a intermediate codec like ProRes, Cineform or DNxHR. Rendering to h.264 involves referencing multiple frames to create the intermediate frames. When those frames have to be rendered first it adds an extra drain on resources, particularly memory. Is the computer hitting the limits of available ...


1

The likely culprit is the Audio setting [Output Track 1], which should normally be "Main 1 (Stereo)", which is the default final bus/mix of the audio in the compiled video. When setting it to "All timeline tracks" -- each audio track (stereo or mono) is rendered as separate tracks (stereo or mono) in the output file.


1

Giphs have the problem that they are heavily compressed most of the time. Uploading the file to Giphy or facebook might additionally re-format the file and compress it even more, as does youtube or vimeo with their files aswell. You might want to try and increase the resolution of your composition and upscaling everything. In your viewer, not a lot will ...


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When you click on the share button you will see “Add Destination “. In the window, you see all the possible export formats. Formats with “Small” or SD will make the export file size smaller. Try MPEG if your device can play it. However, with small file sizes, your tradeoff is low video quality in most cases.


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There is no such thing as 60fps GIFs. GIF files store delay time between frames in whole hundredths of second, so it's impossible to make a GIF with exactly 60fps, because value 1 would give you 100fps and 2 would already have half of that - 50fps. Besides that, many programs (including Google Chrome) ignore value 1 and defaults to much slower animation ...


1

The gif format doesn’t work like this. You won’t be able to get an animation with this high a frame rate. The good news is that many sites which claim to use GIFs actually use mp4 files. I don’t know your exact workflow, but you could try making an mp4 at this frame rate and uploading it to one of the “GIF” sites.


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to get the best quality export from FCPX choose the option from the CODEC "Source = ProRes 422" and then see if that gives you any better results. Alternatively you can choose the option Format = Computer then export from there


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when you are exporting you should be able to change the frame rate in the basic video setting. If you "un-check" the box of the preset option, you can select the rate between different values.


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The straight forward way to go about it is to use Adobe Premiere. It's probably the most widely used video editing software currently (read: a lot of third party plugins, massive amount of free information online). It comes with Adobe Media Encoder. You finish editing your video and add it to the encoding queue. You can export into multiple different formats ...


1

I would suggest you take a look at DaVinci Resolve 14 and see if it can cover what you need. It depends on what editing you need to do as there aren't much in the way of filters available in the free version of Resolve, but it has a reasonable basic NLE and supports a batch renderer. Virtually any decent professional software offers batch render support, ...


1

To expand on @Dul32's answer: Below is the settings dialog for a new sequence. The settings for the preview (what you see when you're editing) are at the bottom, the actual pixels settings for the sequence (what you get at the end by default) are at the top. Note that the size of the sequence also determines the placement of the video clips and any graphic ...


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There is two option at sequence setting. Video and video previews. If the video set 4k, and the video previews set 1080, i shoud not be downscale at rendering.


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Project settings determine the way your source media will be interpreted (played/processed/pre-rendered) by your NLE application. Export settings determine the format of the file that you are going to output once the edit is finished. For example: You shoot video on a Panasonic HVX camera in Apple ProRes 422 codec (HQ). Then you import the clips into ...


1

There are 2 things causing this issue: Chroma sub-sampling. This is explained pretty well in this answer. Compression artifacts - For example, the mark above the "1"on the email notification is due to the way H.264 compresses data. This is known as "ringing" and is quite common with compression. Some options for dealing with it include: Avoid using ...


1

Be sure media encoder has the same LUTs in same order - otherwise it will take a different lut... its a better way to browse to your lut in premiere - Media Encoder will use the same path and therefore doesn't screw up the correct lut. Took a while for me to find out!


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Fcp .xml is limited in features. Although more powerful than other EDL types, most of Premiere's transformation and animation properties are not supported. You can read more about its capabilities here. However it appears Premiere CC neither exports the xml file as recommended by Apple nor in its latest version. I'd suggest collapse your timeline and make ...


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If you're designing source artwork in Illustrator, take advantage of the fact you can bring your .ai files straight in AE. On the layer in AE that you put the AI vector, click the 'continuously rasterize' button and you'll get your crisp vector edges back.


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Generally, all of your assets should be converted to the same frame rate as your final output frame rate before you begin editing. If you do not convert them beforehand, you may have issues with timings. Things that are supposed to be one length end up being a different length. This is especially true if you export a variable frame rate file. Suddenly a 30 ...


1

Ok, just a simple restart of iMovie fixed this. But it is still a weird glitch though.


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It sounds like AE is encountering a point in one of your source files where there may be corrupted data, and while the file might be playable within the AE/PPro canvas, exporting isnt possible because of the way AE reads the file. I don't see why using Media Encoder would be any different, they are built around the same engine. I would suggest trying to ...


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