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Only extract the relevant channel using channelsplit. Use ffmpeg -i "input.mkv" -filter_complex "channelsplit=channel_layout=5.1:channels=FC[FC]" -map '[FC]' -map 0 -c copy -c:a:0 aac "output [Background Removed].mkv"


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This seems to do what you want. il moves the odd lines to the top of the frame, and even lines to the bottom. Then split just creates 2 copies of this. We then crop both copies, to only include the top or the bottom. Finally, framepack will alternate frames from those two streams. ffmpeg -i input.mkv -c:v libx265 -filter_complex '[0:v]il=l=d:c=d,split[t0][b0]...


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add the tag operator and read the file in as text format. ffmpeg \ -y -f concat -i test.txt -c copy \ -map 0:v -map 0:a -map 0:3 \ -copy_unknown -tag:2 gpmd \ test2.mp4 otherwise something like this might do the trick: http://www.dashware.net/how-it-works/


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You are trying to include a codec (dvvideo) into a container (mp4), which doesn't support it (at least in ffmpeg). See difference between codec and container. You better use a codec supported by mp4, say H.265 using libx265 and try converting. See the docs for additional options you may want to apply. Here is the extensive list of codecs supported by mp4, ...


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It depends on the bit depth of the source. If the source material is greater than 8 bits, then 10 bit will give you more color fidelity and less banding in subtle gradients (if there is any in your “pixel art.” Flat cartoons wouldn’t have any gradient detail to preserve, e.g.) If the source is only 8 bits per channel, 10 bit won’t give you any extra detail....


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The input is read via the lavfi device, and the tags are inserted by the blackdetect filter inside the filtergraph. So, they are present in the packets emitted by the filtergraph. Then, once decoded, they are also present in the decoded frames. Use either -show_entries packet_tags=lavfi.black_start,lavfi.black_end or -show_entries frame_tags=lavfi....


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If the images are dated, exiftool can be used to rename the source files to yyyy-mm-dd_hhmm pattern. Then a bash script can create an input file for ffmpeg. Here is a script that shows the idea: https://github.com/leobard/timelapse-prepare-and-run-ffmpeg.sh/blob/main/timelapse-prepare-and-run-ffmpeg.sh


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The scale filter has an option called force_divisible_by for this, scale=w=1280:h=720:force_original_aspect_ration=decrease:force_divisible_by=2


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You can use the h264_metadata bitstream filter. ffmpeg -i in -c copy -bsf:v h264_metadata=crop_top=140 out


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Okay, I found the one option that will show you whether there is hardware support: ffmpeg -codecs | less Then search for your format, it looks like you'd type: /h264<enter> In my case, it shows me that I have nvenc as one of the sub-options: DEV.LS h264 H.264 / AVC / MPEG-4 AVC / MPEG-4 part 10 (decoders: h264 h264_crystalhd ...


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FFmpeg does not support, at present, exporting a MOV or ISO BMFF file with external data references.


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The goal of the above question is potentially impossible, because: You generally cannot pipe mov (or mp4) files unless you used -movflags +faststart when encoding or if run tools/qt-faststart on the input file before piping it. - Carl Eugen This is, because they store crucial information needed to decode towards the end of the file by default, requiring a ...


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Short answer specific to this problem: Use this option: -map_metadata 0:s:2 Explanation: Timecode often comes in a format specific to the file format, so ffmpeg can't be expected to just 'copy' it without getting explicit instructions. In Sony a7siii 4k 10bit footage mp4 file, there is a separate 'data' stream to which it is added as a metadata. It is ...


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