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First, have your subject(s) rehearse the heck out of their presentation if that is practical. If you have access to a Mac, place it near a wall, preferably white. Bounce a cheap lamp off the wall to give your subject soft diffused light, and record using Quicktime (it's free). You can do quick edits right inside Quicktime if you need to. Dave Shaheen ...


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In Premiere To avoid the trip to AE you can do it in Premiere, but it does increase the complexity of your timeline. You use the Track Matte Key effect, plus a colour key effect. It's a little tricky, but here's the basic set-up: start with your three layers. On the bottom, the background that the dancing man is going to be in front of. Could be empty if ...


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Method 1 In your timeline, stack the matte clip on top of the character clip and add the Ultra Key effect to the matte with the red color as the key. Nest those two clips, and place another Ultra Key effect on the nest, this time keying the black. You'll probably have to mess with the ultra key settings a bit (transparency, choke, and soften) for both ...


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Without having seen the movie, it may be difficult to get it down exactly, but here is what I came up with. Duplicate your layer twice, so that you have three copies. On the top layer mask out the person. Set the mask feather to around 30px. Copy and paste the mask to the other two layers. On the middle layer, set the mask feather to 60 and the mask ...


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My DVB-T recordings always have this issue. Try MC-TVConverter2! It is a (old but still reliable) graphical interface for several video tools. Try converting your original ts recording(s) using the MPEG2 HQ setting - I've found this option to be more of a repair than a re-encode, as the conversion is quick and the resultant file size is very close to the ...


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What I would do is concentrate on the setup in front of the camera, to make sure that what you're recording is the best quality it can be, in order to avoid the need for post. Set up your lights so that you have good, soft-ish (no harsh shadows) lighting that is well colour balanced. A 3-point light setup is the standard way of lighting interview subjects, ...


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It looks like you machine might just be too slow to live render the effects. The red bar on your timeline is an indicator of that. Try selecting the clip in the timeline after you add the scale keys, then from the menu bar choose Sequence > Render Selection. After that renders out, the red bar in the timeline should change to green, and you should be able ...


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You can tell by the shadows that light's illumination was increased. However, you can acheive a similar result (though not perfect) by just keyframing the 'Curves' effect in After Effects. (I had better results with 'Curves' as opposed to 'Levels') See below: The curves were keyframed from default to: The top point is to blow out the whites, the middle ...


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In my experience (using handbrake) increasing the bit depth increases the file size but not by much. However, lowering the CRF is what causes significantly larger files. I encoded several times the same source with different settings to see what I'd get, so for a random source of 1.45Gb (H.264/AVC) it gave theses results: H.265 8bit CRF 22 (slow) > 362.6 Mb ...


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What is on a laser disc is a 8.1/7.1 MHz FM carrier modulated by the NTSC/PAL video signal. Since laser can only detects pits-and-lands (as you stated), that signal is encoded using PWM (it encode it by effectively chopping it up into discrete parts). I found this schema from wikipedia to be very helpful : https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laserdisc#/media/...


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You need to define what is acceptable to you. Record a well illuminated scene and increase the ISO while decreasing the aperture and compare what noise level on your specific camera is acceptable for you, and you will know what are the limitations of your equipment. In the case of the example video, the noise is "the same" because both moments, the dark ...


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OMG strobe! That's what the "laggy" effect is; it was very popular with "experimental" film school students back in the nineties. It went the way of lens flares and the posterisation effect; some would say it is better left in its tomb, but that's a matter of personal taste. If you slow down the video you'll see what's going on, the apparent frame rate is ...


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