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1

Use the frame guides built into whichever camera you use, and set the guides to 4:3. Both cameras you mention have them. When you're shooting, compose your image inside the frame guide. The camera will record outside of that area, but when you edit, you'll crop the image back down to 4:3. The extra pixels around the edges allow you to do things like; ...


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Try transcoding and relinking the media: File → Media Management.


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There is an effect in the Effects > Distort folder called Offset. It can add a vertical or horizontal offset to a clip, and wraps the overflow back around, all in one go. If I apply it to the example image I get a white line, which is possibly an artefact of the screenshot (if I look at the image file there's a few pixels of white at the bottom).


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1) Select the clip in your timeline and in the effects controls panel just adjust the 'y' position value until the line at the top is out of frame. 2) Duplicate the clip on your timeline into the second video track, and make the same adjustment but in the opposite direction so that only the content above the line is visible at the bottom of the program ...


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i quit the create dvd icon and it disappears and then the writing to disc icon appears to compete the disc... as if there was a glitch in the writing to disc animation... good luck


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Pretty much any modern NLE will allow you to do this, with varying levels of difficulty. For example, in Davinci Resolve you could do most of this in the free version, except for removing the fisheye effect which is I believe only available in the Studio version.


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FirstFrame = 1 ...... ...... Raw = ImageReader("GOPR%04d.JPG", FirstFrame, LastFrame, FrameRate) Probably the file GOPR0001.JPG doesn't exist in your current directory. From AviSynth manual: The first file in the sequence, i.e., corresponding to 'start', MUST exist in order for clip parameters to be computed. Any missing files in the sequence ...


2

It depends on the USB flash drive, for example some have > 100 MB/s R/W capability and would be similar to working with a traditional HDD. However USB flash drives have chips which are not meant for constant use and lots of writing, and they don't have wear leveling like a good SSD. This means that the flash drive will go bad sooner and you will lose your ...


2

Shot 1 makes the most sense. In shot 1, your camera doesn't "cross the line" between the two characters. (That's an important cinematography rule; audiences unconsciously expect it.) Here's the easy way to apply this rule to a scene with 2 characters: The character on the left of the frame in the wide shot should always be looking towards the right of the ...


1

I find that charting the room can help with figuring out eyeline. Here’s the overhead of your scene. The two characters are the dots matching their shirt colors. Green camera 0 is the wider shot. The yellow line is the eyeline created between them that indicates the 180 degree rule. With your establishing shot, you need to stay out of the yellow dashed ...


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