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Chameleons do have some pretty wild colors they can change into, and the process is extremely advanced, requiring physicists and biologists to fully understand how it works; check out this video for how it works. Personal note: Something this advanced doesn't happen by random chance. Anyway, my personal opinions aside, it appears to me, this video was ...


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Before going too far, i don't think there is something on earth would like wasting energy to keep changing appearance for nothing, or do you think it knows it is on TV and know where the camera is? Come on! Someone plz tells me i am wrong.


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If I was doing this for a video production, I would use After Effects, and import the GPX track from a GPS device into a mapping plugin like GeoLayers: https://aescripts.com/learn/1-min-tut-use-geolayers-with-a-gpx-track/


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I personally use RaceRender, however, there is also DashWare. Both can edit video and add GPS position overlays. Bare in mind, neither of them can add the actual "map" like one from Google Maps, just a line showing your path and a marker showing the current location. Again, my personal preference is to use RR or DW to produce a video with a magenta ...


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Yes, it is somewhat like a motion tracking, just open your file in AE and then create a null object and track the motion of that video and save the data to the null object, and then parent your video file to the null object.


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mpdecimate filter drop frames that do not differ greatly from the previous frame in order to reduce frame rate. This command will filter the duplicate frames ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf mpdecimate -loglevel debug -f null - To remove these duplicates and generate a video ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf mpdecimate,setpts=N/FRAME_RATE/TB out.mp4


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In Resolve, "Power Bins" are what you use to make elements available across projects. Unfortunately, as of version 16.3, Resolve won't store Compound Clips, Multicam Clips or Fusion Clips inside a Power Bin. However, in your case, a workaround is fairly straightforward. Whether your image is static or animated; an exported still image, file ...


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You would do this kind of thing in After-Effects or a similar compositing program (like Nuke or Fusion). Simply duplicate your video as many times as you want the move to be repeated, then offset the layers in time, and lastly roughly mask out the person from every shot except the very bottom layer.


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If you have Premiere, chances are you have After Effects, which would be the best option for this job. But Premiere is still capable of doing it, without any roundtripping to other aps. Here's my results, I just used a screenshot of your screenshot, so you'll probably get a better result using your original footage. To get this I duplicated the layer, and ...


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A Clip(C) is a sequence of frames, each frame(f) consists of video and audio frames, the duration(t) of each frame is constant and is determined by the frame rate. For the i th clip(Ci), it is defined as (fi_n) n∈ℕ back to your question, the idea is to find the result of ⊕Cj , where j ∈ {0,…,19} Since the sizes of all Cj are not the same, the elements or ...


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To minimise the file size for distribution of something like this, you need a Variable Frame Rate encoder, which will effectively just encode 1 frame, and set the frame rate such that there's no further frames. I've not seen this available in Adobe (or any commercial product I've looked into), but definitely there are services I've seen encoding video this ...


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FFMPEG has colorkey and chromakey options, it does something likes Overlay a greenscreen-video on top of a static background image Using a shell script to loop through your thousand images on the ffmpeg command would be helpful.


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If I may, I would recommend using Davinci Resolve for this. It's free and does what you want way better than premiere. Since your question was raised for premiere though, let me propose two different solutions for this. Use a Luma-Matte for an adjustment layer. To to this: Duplicate your footage Apply curves on the footage to maximise the contrast. (the ...


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Without seeing the tutorial, it's difficult to say exactly, but I think what is happening is that the colour matte nest that you've created, is being used to control the blur on your other layer, probably by being set to being used as an "alpha matte". If your colour matte layer wasn't nested, I think Premiere wouldn't be able to see the alpha ...


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One way to do it is to overlay the relevant part of the presentation with another image (could be a blank image). This is called picture in picture, which is often used to overlay another video across part of a background video, but of course the same principle works for still images too. You need a video editor that offers such a feature, any professional ...


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