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You first need to tell us which software you're using. I'm assuming it's the adobe media encoder? Handbrake? ffmpeg? Nonetheless, the filesize is determined by your resolution, framerate and bitrate. Try exporting the video with VBR with 2 passes and set the bitrate to something between 3 and 6 - that should be enough for a 1920x1080 h264.


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I have done this sort of thing using ffmpeg and powershell core (both free software). You can use any other scripting language to loop over ffmpeg once for each section of video that you want to keep. The ffmpeg command that you want looks like this: ffmpeg -ss [start_time] -i [input_file] -to [end_time] [output_file] So, and example would be: ffmpeg -ss 00:...


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They show you where the rest the unused part of your clip is relative to your timeline. So if you used the first 5 seconds of a 10 second clip in a 10 second comp, you would see a greyed-out bar form 5-10 seconds in your comp. You can drag the edges of your clip out to extend it in your timeline. To remove them you would need to change the duration of the ...


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The solution turned out that if a key is already mapped to something else then it won't work. Davinci usually points out errors if something is already mapped however as seen from the attached image, no warnings are triggered so I assumed it should work.


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EDIT: I was able to assign and de-assign 'c' to be the same as backspace. That's weird. When I added 'c', it showed up on the right of the backspace in your screenshot, but when I closed and reopened, it have moved to the left as in your screenshot. I'm using 16.2.3 on a Mac. Sorry I don't have any tips. Maybe your preferences are corrupted somehow?


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This behaviour is normal because a title element is bound to the video frame rate. All visual elements must start/end in "between" frames. In your example GIF you zoomed enough in and even can see the markers. Note the line just below the timecode. The reason sound is not bound to this is because sound has a much greater Samplerate. If you think of ...


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Four free & open source video editing software that I would suggest trying out are: Kdenlive OpenShot Shotcut Olive I have not tested any of them thoroughly, as I generally just use a combination of Avidemux & FFmpeg for very simple video editing.


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Open the project Goto File->Choose Profile Select the profile you want Save changes Note: checked with OpenShot 2.5.1


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There is no Linux version of Premiere or After Effects, so the short answer is no. If you are using a Linux machine and need to render an AE or Premiere project, the main solution is to ask someone with that software to render it for you. You can try rendering under WINE, which is a compatibility layer that tries to run Windows software on Linux, but that ...


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That can be pretty simple if your video editor support this. For example here's how you do it in Adobe's Premiere Pro:


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BlackMagic Davinci Resolve and Fusion run on both RHEL and Centos, and have Python2, 3 and LUA integrated for automation. The title of your question leads me to believe you're already using Adobe suite, but the body suggests otherwise. There's a free version of Resolve with most of the features of the full version, so it can't hurt to try. I honestly don'...


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If you prefer a free editor, Blender could achieve something like this. You need to look at the luma key nodes. Blender is free but has a steep learning curve. Adobe Premiere could do this quickly using a track matte, but it's not free. After Effects is also paid-software, and has a steeper learning curve than Premiere, but can also use track mattes - see ...


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