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If you're on a Mac, Keynote is free, and works well. You could prepare your slides, then open Quicktime Player to do a screen record whilst you record your audio and run your slides. It's a good idea to have lots of hard drive space when working on a video - the files can be large, but then you can make a smaller compressed version for sharing afterwards. If ...


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Use PowerPoint. The truth is that the latest version of it can do nice transitions so the presentation is not dull at all. At the end, you can export as a video to Mp4. If used properly you do not need video edition at all. Do not use less than HD for your videos. The resolution may not be important to you, but the viewers are used to Full HD.


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For future videos, you better have a defined reference in all videos. For example a clapperboard or a standardized grey card. Then you can match all videos during colour grading both regarding the white balance and exposure. Usually editors let you set the black and white point or midtone with a colour picking tool that you use on the clapperboard or ...


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The filesize is determined by many factors. First, check your resolution. If you're exporting in 4k or 6k, your filesize might not be strange at all. Next, the framerate plays a big part in filesizes aswell. Check if you're exporting in 30fps (for most web-videos), 25fps (for tv) or 24fps (for cinema). It might just be that you are using something like 60 or ...


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I don't Wanna Lose Any Data... Okay that makes sense. But With Thousands of Frames in 4K File Size Matters.... So Why not Encode to H265 That makes sense in a vacuum, but it's incompatible with the initial goal. The reason that H.264 or H.265 is so much smaller than your initial image sequence is because those codecs use lossy compression. You can't ...


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As, Sir Gyan Commented... HEVC Doesn't Support 16-bit....


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