Hot answers tagged

31

Some general info about the formats used: YouTube uses 4 container formats and 4 different codecs. It depends on the popularity of the video what codecs are used for your video (see below why). Generally, every of your uploaded videos will be encoded in h.264 and will be muxed into an .flv and .mp4 container. That's the standard and this will happen for ...


13

tl;dr: Since Youtube reencodes all videos regardless of the upload format, it really isn't that important. Just export your video with a high bitrate to preserve quality. Also see my answer here regarding quality loss caused by Youtube. Long answer: Each reencoding of a video to a compressed format lowers the quality. Usually, that means you'll lose quality ...


7

There's actually a big difference between the two. If you're on a budget and don't mind that editing video is not as straight forward, then Motion is actually not a bad route to take. Final Cut allows you to use things you've created in Motion as graphical templates. Motion in and of itself is a 2D(/3D) animation app, it wasn't made for video editing. ...


7

No, there is no difference to the human eye (or exceptionally minimal). Your monitor can't display higher quality than it is capable of displaying. The only advantage you would have is if you were to zoom in on part of the image, you would have more detail when you zoomed in. The exception to this is if the 4k stream uses enough extra bandwidth to reduce ...


7

YouTube will re-encode whatever you give it. VP9 is currently too slow to encode. So the best choice is to either: Give it the original footage, or if it is not accepted by YouTube or is too big to upload, then... Re-encode to H.264 ffmpeg ffmpeg will accept just about any input and will provide a great quality output. Development is very active, so it is ...


6

I've answered a similar question some time ago. YouTube added a few codecs since then but all the info there still applys: How does YouTube encode my uploads and what codec should I use to upload? Short answer: Yes if you are concerned about maximum quality a lossless codec or visually lossless codec is the way to go. Re-encoding always means loss of ...


6

It's not very clear what they mean. If you look further down on the same page it says it accepts 5.1 @ 512 kbps. Recommended audio bitrates for uploads Mono 128 kbps Stereo 384 kbps 5.1 512 kbps YouTube doesn't currently support 5.1 playback. If you upload a 5.1 audio track it gets converted to stereo.


6

No, you cannot, and this is a good thing for privacy reasons. Using the YouTube Data API v3 you can get general statistics for a list of videos as part of a contentDetails structure: "statistics": { "viewCount": unsigned long, "likeCount": unsigned long, "dislikeCount": unsigned long, "favoriteCount": unsigned long, "commentCount": ...


5

Very broadly speaking, you have a much easier experience obtaining permission if you are not making money from someone else's content. Most copyright laws recognise 'fair use' -- a small quote or a clip that is proof of someone else having said something. It is customary and advisable to put such clip in a box or window to show that the content is being ...


5

I worked out a satisfactory solution to this problem. It involves adding the 'Computer RGB to Studio RGB' Video FX to each video track in your Vegas Studio project. This effects the rendered file and project quite a lot but appears normal when uploaded to Youtube: Quicktime Youtube It's possible to disable the track Video FX whilst you work on your ...


5

There's not a lot of point to it. You're using more network bandwidth to download it, and your computer is working harder to display it, but no, you get no additional visible quality from it. In fact, it's likely that you'll get lower quality because the computer has to downsample it before it can display it.


5

Youtube generally reencodes all videos you upload to youtube to ensure compatibility across various platforms and to provide smaller versions of the videos for users with slow internet connections. So yes, both the video and the audio stream of your video file will be compressed and reencoded when you upload it. If someone uses a third party tool to download ...


5

First, get ffmpeg. Generally, you want to give YouTube the highest quality you can because it will re-encode anything you give it, but the formats used in MXF can be mental for uploading. So re-encoding to modern formats for a more manageable upload often makes sense. Example ffmpeg -i input.mxf \ -filter_complex "[0:a:0][0:a:1]amerge" \ -ac 2 -c:v ...


5

The effect you are talking about is called jumpcut and it is particularly popular among vloggers. As far as I know, there is no automatic way to do it although it would probably be possible to do from technological perspective. However using jumpcuts has several functions. You get rid of silence and squeeze as much information in short form as possible, ...


4

It's referred to as a jump cut. I would guess that perhaps the Apple ads that used it might have made it popular again, but that's just a guess. The idea behind it is to visually show a change in direction of thought since typically it matches up with the start of another phrase. It jumps the viewer forward in time and makes them aware of a subtle change ...


4

A coworker has just turned me on to using Warp Stabilizer. It's a built-in effect in Adobe Premiere CS6. Before using this tool, I also used After Effects to smooth and stabilize motion. The difference is outstanding. Warp Stabilizer has worked faster, within my workflow, and more reliable than After Effects stabilization has. This has been huge for me. ...


4

Why would you want your videos in the .3gp container to begin with? Its a very irrelevant format nowadays, there is practically no device that supports the 3gp container but not MP4 at the same time. Its nothing but a close derivative of MP4, they are very similar container formats holding the same codec. If you want to support a lot of devices using h264 in ...


4

There could be any number of factors as to why people quit watching a video, but if you want to entice them to stick around, there are a few tricks. Yes, "content is king," but CONTEXT is arguably queen— and let's be honest, who really rules the castle? That is to say— even if your content is great, if you aren't getting it to the right audience, it won't ...


4

You are missing the point. He is not cutting out silence, he is keeping up a good hectic pace, making it hard to switch off while watching. Manually done. Why? Telling a story, so you need to know what parts are relevant and what parts aren't Sometimes even though there are silent parts, there are other visual things going on, like wild gestures, funny ...


4

Since you asked for general feedback, here's a few things I noticed: 0:00 The logo animation is too long in my opinion, especially since the video itself isn't that long. 0:12 Make the text much smaller, use the same font and font weight as in the inspire of the logo, it will look more coherent and sophisticated. Text doesn't need to fill most of the screen....


4

What you are referring to is called a series playlist. A series playlist is used to display videos in that manner. What you have misunderstood is that it's actually the name of the show that is displayed before the "S11 E80", although I understand that it is confusing when the show has the same name as the channel. This feature is easily utilized, it is ...


4

Use ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -vf yadif,format=yuv420p -force_key_frames expr:gte(t\,n_forced/2) -c:v libx264 -crf 18 -bf 2 -c:a aac -q:a 1 -ac 2 -ar 48000 -use_editlist 0 -movflags +faststart out.mp4 -vf specifies video filters yadif will deinterlace videos if they're interlaced. format=yuv420p will produce pixel format with 4:2:0 chroma subsampling. -...


3

Why convert to OGV when your final upload is going to be to youtube, I may be wrong but you can convert to x264 video codec with AAC Audio even on linux and upload that to youtube considering that is what they prefer to be uploaded anyway. Have you tried making an h264 and uploading to youtube instead of the OGV file and seeing if that was the issue. ...


3

As of now, Youtube doesn't allow multiple soundtracks other than adding a music-track. So you'll need to create multiple videos with voice-over for different languages. Thankfully however this is already automated using a bash script. Demo Video with Automatic voice-over translation from SRT subtitles using eSpeak VoiceOver Script Version 0.3 to convert ...


3

Amazingly, the best place to start with a question like this is Youtube. Believe it or not they have help file that explain the process with quite a bit of detail: https://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1722171&topic=2888648&ctx=topic On Youtube itself many others have offered up video tutorials on how to do it: Youtube....


3

The reason you are losing contrast is because of the codec you are using to export to. YouTube (as well as Vimeo, and practically every other video website nowadays) works using the H.264 codec. Here are YouTube's instructions for how they'd like videos to be encoded for upload. The TL;DR version of that page: Container: .mp4 Audio Codec: AAC-LC ...


3

In nearly all countries, copyright protects creative works automatically. Some exceptions and restrictions apply, but unless the author has voluntarily added his work to the public domain or the copyright has expired (common terms are seventy and ninety years after publication or after death of the author), it's safe to assume all songs are copyrighted, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible