4

There are a lot of variables in this equation, and any one of them could be the culprit. These include: the quality of the audio picked up by the lapel mic, the quality of the PA preamp, the quality of the PA signal output to the wireless transmitter, the quality of the wireless transmitter, the quality of the wireless receiver, and finally, the quality of ...


3

I see no reason why not. You'd just have to make sure you find a transmitter that's battery powered, and small enough so you can bundle it with the micro-recorder. The question is; is it necessary. Would you be able to do anything, such as stop the event/filming, if there was a problem? Secondly; the feed you're monitoring is only going to tell you it's ...


2

Any camera with an HDMI or SDI output can can stream via wifi using a Teradek Cube (http://teradek.com/pages/cube). This setup will allow you to monitor and record via iOS or computer. It also supports remote recording over the internet (decoder needed). In addition to WiFi, Terdek also supports 3G/4G/LTE cellular networks via a USB modem.


2

I do this all the time for local user groups and I'm yet to find a "plug and play/set and forget" solution. To do the recordings at a professional quality, you need some sort of skill and training, otherwise it will look amateur. If all you want to record is the person talking, and not what's on their screen, it's relatively easy: buy a wireless lapel mic (...


1

After searching forums and YouTube videos, I believe I've found the culprit: My building's ultrasonic motion detectors. They emit an ultrasonic chirp every few seconds that the mics 'hear' and turn the volume down (attenuate?) for that portion. I've contacted Sony Professional Equipment support and I've been issued a Beta Firmware upgrade for the ...


1

You could get a Sennheiser ClipMic, plug it into a cell phone, and then establish a Bluetooth connection between the cell phone and the Laptop. I can't give any first-hand recommendations on best practices for Bluetooth audio streaming for live mics (I think most professionals prefer dedicated RF equipment to BT), but it does seem like there are options ...


1

Cerevo Liveshell 2. It,s battery powered also. As receiving-end use a laptop with vlc player. Hdmi from laptop to mixer. I used this setup a few times.


1

Nitero Is looking to create a wireless solution for VR by the end of this year, which very well may apply to what you need as well. At the very least, if this technology does get off the ground we may see higher fidelity wireless solutions for video be produced off the back of this technology in the coming months/years. Basically, it might be worth waiting a ...


1

Yes, they exist. They are called HDMI wireless extenders. Sometimes they are called transmitters/receivers. No, the good ones are not cheap. Further, I don't know of any where the receiver does not need external power. Here's two examples, a better one and a not so better one: IOGear Matrix pro (Here's a different offering) Gefan Long Range Extender I ...


1

This is commonly done. I suppose with modern digital systems it might be more complicated, but with standard analog systems it should work fine. You'll just need the frequency from the FOH team.


1

Don't have any experience with Wifi Security Cameras but this one here would fit your specs, aswell as the other IP cameras from that company: http://foscam.us/wireless-ip-cameras/foscam-fi9805w-wireless-ip-camera.html I have not used their cameras and can't tell you if they are any good. Actually a lot IP enabled security cameras fit the specs. As long as ...


1

There is the Eyefi product line which basically wraps a small wifi chip together with a small arm SoC into an SD package with some limited internal storage. http://www.eyefi.com/products/prox2 They do work but the range is rather limited and you have to use their software in order to use them. Also only SD cards in their product line which aren't used in ...


1

On a side note, I believe the power is required for the analog to digital converter in wireless transmissions, and not the signal itself, since there is +5V DC power running through one of the pins. So you might actually have better luck searching for USB powered signal converters, because once the signal is digital, you're home free. Something like this: ...


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