5

There is a big difference between saving your project, then returning to the project to do some additional changes, such as brightness adjustments, then exporting a media file, and exporting a media file from your project, importing the result into a new project, doing some additional changes, such as brightness adjustments, then exporting the result of ...


4

MP4 isn't an ideal format for intermediate saves. If you know you'll be re-opening the file, save it as losslessly as practicable, and use MP4 only for the final output. That said, depending on the encoder and settings you probably don't lose much if anything on subsequent saves. MP4 and similar codecs work by decimating the higher frequencies (details, ...


2

.MOV is a container format, not a video format. As such it can contain media in any number of 'tracks' of audio, video, subtitles etc. In particular, video tracks may use any supported codec, not just Apple-specific ones. It's very common to see H264 encoded video in a MOV file, and H264 is widely supported on Apple, Windows and Linux platforms. So if you ...


2

It can be made directly on the YouTube website. Look at the "Upload" page at the bottom-right corner:


1

If you have a high-end i7 PC desktop, you probably have the infrastructure to set up a high-performance RAID that can handle your I/O bandwidth requirements. 10GB/min = 167MB/sec, which a really good 3.5" disk can almost deliver. If you stripe 2 such disks together, it's an easy target to hit (as long as there's no other I/O contention). So, have your ...


1

The limitation is certainly the disk I/O, which at 10GB/min is outside the capabilities of all but very high-end disk subsystems. It's generally true that you should work at the highest bit rate and bit depth your system is capable of so you have the headroom for processing, but your system simply isn't capable of working at the rates your asking of it. ...


1

The file gets bigger because the encoder struggles to keep the quality of the resulting file as close to the same as the original as possible. AviDemux allows you to cut out parts of a video file without re-encoding.


1

The straight forward way to go about it is to use Adobe Premiere. It's probably the most widely used video editing software currently (read: a lot of third party plugins, massive amount of free information online). It comes with Adobe Media Encoder. You finish editing your video and add it to the encoding queue. You can export into multiple different formats ...


1

I would suggest you take a look at DaVinci Resolve 14 and see if it can cover what you need. It depends on what editing you need to do as there aren't much in the way of filters available in the free version of Resolve, but it has a reasonable basic NLE and supports a batch renderer. Virtually any decent professional software offers batch render support, ...


1

Avid just came out with a free version of Media Composer, looks very capable. "It's a fact that over 95% of all mainstream movies released in 2016 were edited on Media Composer. And so were most TV shows, too! Media Composer | First is a completely free version of the same video editing application, available on either Mac or PC. If you are an aspiring ...


1

There is a simple Video editing suite called Camtasia.It is not free but you can try out the trial,If you like it you can purchase it. It has an "Extend Frame" feature (also available in 7th version) that will allow you to extend a particular frame of video on the timeline as long as you want so that audio narration can continue. That should achieve the ...


1

With ffmpeg, on Windows, create a batch file AudiotoVid.cmd for %%A in (*.mp3 *.m4a *.wav *.flac *.ape) do ffmpeg -i "%%A" -i "c:\path\to\image.png" -map 1:v -map 0:a -pix_fmt yuv420p -shortest -f mp4 "%~nA.mp4" Run it in each folder that you wish to convert. For each audio file of the given extensions. it will create a MP4 in the same folder as the audio ...


1

A WLMP file can be opened as an xml. Save a copy of the project changing the extension to XML. Convert XML to CSV using one of various free converters available online. Open the CSV file as a spreadsheet (Excel, Calc, etc). Now you can access the filenames and durations of each edit. You must reformat your spreadsheet to match an EDL format supported ...


1

You can use ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, to do this: ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -vf "select=not(mod(n\,30)),setpts=N/FRAME_RATE/TB" -r 30 out.mp4 -vf specifies a video filterchain i.e. a sequence of filters applied to a single input. select=not(mod(n\,30)) - this filter keeps only each 30th frame from the source. FFmpeg works primarily within the framework of ...


1

Yes. By definition, any time you save an audio or video file using a LOSSY compression scheme, you will lose something (by definition). Now, modern codecs have been getting better at minimizing perceptible losses. But it is always preferable to avoid ANY extra compression steps. Until the project is completely finished and ready for distribution, it is ...


1

If the codec is not lossless, such as Quicktime Animation Codec; true lossless, then yes. But if you are using a good encoder, I would gather even after 100 generations of degredation would you be able to even visually see the difference if you continually re-encoded the file outputs using MP4 at a high bitrate- say 30mbps for 1080p. Lower bitrates, yes....


1

Yes. Every time you "save" video in video-editor, you will re-render it with codec. Most codecs lose some video information for compression. So, every time you will lose some more information.


1

The variable frame rate is all that stands out. Save future videos with constant frame rate. As for these ones, transcode using ffmpeg* to CFR MP4s: ffmpeg -i currentvideo.mp4 -c:a copy -crf 16 -r 30 -fflags +genpts newvideo.mp4 *Get the 32-bit static build.


1

Any decent video editing software will allow you to specify bitrate and resolution in export settings. Sony Vegas Pro or Movie Studio, Adobe Premiere Elements, as should Cyberlink Powerdirector among others. For a 2 hour movie with 700MB as output size, you want a target or average bitrate of 670 kbps for the video and 128 kbps for the audio.


1

There's no native support for any sort of "Picture-in-Picture" functionality in Windows Movie Maker, so unfortunately, what you are asking cannot be done in WMM.


1

Simply put, because you are using it for more than it was intended. Movie Maker is not designed to be used for making much more than super, super simply videos. They didn't put a lot of resources in to it as it is an extra added for free to another product. Asking why it has issues is a bit like asking why you can't use MS Paint for photo manipulation, it ...


1

This is most likely a problem related to the app you are using to create/view these stop-motion videos. If you have portrait-orientated pictures, creating a video accordingly is simply a matter of setting the right video dimensions (i.e. video width and height in pixels); basically every video editing software allows you to set this manually or choose from a ...


1

As Windows Movie Maker don't support multi track editing, I don't think it is possible to overlay images onto the main video. Similarly, I don't think it has the required features to blur a specific area. If you are looking for a software recommendation, Sony Movie Studio can do both of these things (£60), and so can Blender (free, but very hard to learn) ...


1

There is no way to do this with WMM, it doesn't support video compositing. Filelab Video Editor is a free, online program that can do this for you.


1

There are several possibilities here. It could be that one device or both dropped frames and thus ended up out of sync, it could be a difference in frame rate or it could simply be that one or both devices have inaccurate internal clocks for recording. Your best bet is to identify a point at the beginning and at the end of each video that should be the ...


1

Sorry this is a little late but but did you ever figure it out? I wouldn't recommend using windows movie maker for much of anything. The reason it doesn't accept .mov files is because it's windows movie maker, a Microsoft product using microsoft proprietary files .AVI and .WMV... .MOV is quicktime which is Apple. You mentioned that you converted over ...


1

Windows Movie Maker, being a Microsoft product, works with WMV files using the Windows Media Video codecs. You can use the free Windows Media Encoder to encode the files. I believe there is also a free version of Microsoft Expression Encoder that you could use as well. Expression is a bit newer, but slightly less capable since they moved a lot of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible