12

It's an artifact of the player, not the encoder. I used the command below to generate a RGB format capture in HuffYUV ffmpeg -f dshow -video_size 1920x1080 -framerate 30 -i video="screen-capture-recorder" -c:v huffyuv -t 5 cap.mkv Then transcoded the file to x264 lossless RGB ffmpeg -i cap.mkv -c:v libx264rgb -crf 0 -preset ultrafast h264rgb.mkv ...


8

No most video formats (nearly all) do not allow custom ICC color profiles to be embedded. (Improvemet/correction: MP4s can have color profiles tagged in the metadata of a video file.) most video on the consumer end is intended for the REC.709 color space. sRGB is similar and uses the same primaries. transcoding (including compressing) will almost always ...


8

Movies have certain "looks" to arouse certain moods. The lightning and color depends on the intention of the movie and each individual scene. Let's take the picture you linked as an example: The footballer is lit by the floodlights in the stadium. He is lit from every side so that you can see as much as possible, there is little shadow and contrast. The ...


8

Generally, H.264 and H.265 (as well as others like VP9) are lossy codecs, at least in their default settings with most encoders. This means that whenever you re-encode from one to another (or even in the same codec), you throw away information. Whether this information loss is visible or not depends on your source material and the chosen settings, of course....


8

Those are interlacing artifacts. They become visible when the motion in the video is faster than the field rate, so that when both fields are combined into a progressive scan image, the movement is visible in a single frame. They can be removed with a de-interlace filter. I've never personally used one with Virtualdub, but several are available: MSU Smart ...


7

With low light levels your brightest signal will be close to the noise floor, so you only really have three options: a camera with better low light performance (although this can only take you so far) More expensive sensors can give a lower noise floor, allowing you to resolve more detail a faster lens As Jason commented: If the widest aperture on ...


7

The CRF scales for x264 and x265 do not correspond. x265 CRF 28 is supposed to be equivalent to x264 CRF 23. But x265 is not yet as mature in its development as x264, so take that CRF equivalence with a pinch of salt. That said, you can try to establish your own calibration between the current versions of the encoding libraries in your ffmpeg by running ...


6

No, there is no practical limit that we know of yet to what would be best, there is however a practical limit to what we can capture and display. In tests with airforce pilots, subjects were able to identify a plane from being shown a frame for only 1/220th of a second.1 They eye is able to pull information out of extremely short periods of time, but ...


6

There are a few things you are missing, and a few more you just aren't fully appreciating how much of a difference the things you mentioned make. First, the S6 sensor is not over 1/2 inch, it is 1/2.6 inch, which is substantially smaller than a 1/2 inch sensor, particularly since sensors are measured diagonally. Second, lenses matter a lot more than the ...


5

Option placement matters Is there an option I'm missing? No, but option placement matters. Options before the input apply to the input, and options before the output generally apply to the output. The exception are global options. See the FFmpeg synopsis and FFmpeg description for more details on option placement. Therefore, you must move your -q (alias ...


5

For VHS, the signal will be kept highest quality if you connect via s-video, so yes, you should use an s-video cable if your VCR has an s-video output. Depending on how good your VCR is, you may get a significant improvement from a better deck. Quality of the read heads on various VCRs can vary a fair bit and while the majority of the difference was in ...


5

There are quite a few programs that do so-called "full reference" measurement, i.e. comparing an original against a degraded signal: http://www.acceptv.com/en/products_vqa.php http://compression.ru/video/quality_measure/index_en.html (commercial) http://www.its.bldrdoc.gov/resources/video-quality-research/guides-and-tutorials/description-of-vqm-tools.aspx (...


5

One big loss in converting VHS to DVD arises from going through the composite domain. Both VHS and MPEG2 use a separated chroma paradigm -- on the VHS tape are two signals, essentially luma and bandwidth-limited chroma. MPEG2 (the standard for DVD) also uses separate luma and chroma. But the standard output from a VHS player combines the signals in a way ...


5

There is a big difference between saving your project, then returning to the project to do some additional changes, such as brightness adjustments, then exporting a media file, and exporting a media file from your project, importing the result into a new project, doing some additional changes, such as brightness adjustments, then exporting the result of ...


5

Per the OP's request, I will attempt to explicitly answer his single-sentence questions. First I need you to define bit rate. Bit rate is the number of bits per second used to encode a video stream (which itself has an implicit data rate based on the number of pixels (width x height), the pixel depth (dynamic range, color gamut), and frame rate). Here is ...


5

I can answer your first question. At the same bitrate and transcoding from an 8-bit source 10-bit HEVC is better than 8-bit HEVC, because it hardcodes dither. https://gist.github.com/l4n9th4n9/4459997 I am still unsure, whether that makes 12-bit HEVC transcodes superior to 10-bit, thats why I ended up here.


5

The quality of the images you posted look completely normal to me for what you are doing. You're taking a screenshot and scaling it down. That means that anything drawn as a single pixel in the user interface is going to become less than a pixel wide in the final video, making it seem soft. You have a few options to deal with this. You can set your screen ...


5

525/60 digitized SD video according to Rec. 601 is indeed 720 pixels wide, 480 pixels high, including some blanking on the sides. Digital equivalent of 625/50 is 720x576. In both cases, frame aspect ratio is 4:3, this simply means that the pixels are not square. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-1_(Sony) To make matters more complex, only a subset of the ...


4

As far as deinterlacing: With a good deinterlacer (QTGMC, or at least ffmpeg's yadif=3,mcdeint=2), you can get smooth video at 60000/1001 (NTSC) fps. If your source has quick motions that you'd like to look smooth, even in slo-mo, then deinterlace 640x480i60 -> 640x480p60. If you really need small files, you can drop every other frame of the deinterlaced ...


4

Should be mentioned that the 600D isn't exactly the best DSLR for video out there. The artifacts that you are experiencing in your footage are the result of high compression. Check your video settings if you can increase the bitrate or choose a different codec other than h.264/AVC if Canon offers one by now for their DSLRs. This thread might be interesting ...


4

Trade in the iPad and buy a desktop or laptop that you can edit on. You will not produce professional results entirely on an iPad. I am not aware of any good video editing options for iPad, certainly none of the big names have a product available. There simply isn't enough horsepower on a tablet to perform the hard, complex operations involved in video ...


4

The reason why modern TVs have been pushing higher framerates is not because people can see much beyond 30-60Hz, but because if the source framerate and the display framerate doesn't match exactly, then the display has to either drop frames, or add frames. This mismatch is visible, particularly during panning scenes, for instance. It used to be that made-...


4

There's no way to do this losslessly, other than setting a meta-data flag and depending on players to rotate the video. (This is what cell-phone cameras do). With avconv / ffmpeg, what you're doing is using your decoded -> transposed video as a source to encode with x264. See https://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/Encode/H.264 for how to do this. IDK where you ...


4

Well you've kinda answered your own question: Both videos have the same size because you used the same settings, specifically the settings for target bitrate and maximum bitrate (assuming you're using the H264 codec, other codecs might only have an average bitrate setting available). If you use identical bitrate settings, videos of the same length will ...


4

In my experience (using handbrake) increasing the bit depth increases the file size but not by much. However, lowering the CRF is what causes significantly larger files. I encoded several times the same source with different settings to see what I'd get, so for a random source of 1.45Gb (H.264/AVC) it gave theses results: H.265 8bit CRF 22 (slow) > 362.6 Mb ...


4

MP4 isn't an ideal format for intermediate saves. If you know you'll be re-opening the file, save it as losslessly as practicable, and use MP4 only for the final output. That said, depending on the encoder and settings you probably don't lose much if anything on subsequent saves. MP4 and similar codecs work by decimating the higher frequencies (details, ...


4

FFMPEG is probably a better tool for the job, if you are prepared to deal with the command line. Install ffmpeg from the packages found here. These are all ready-built and should have all the included libraries you need. Once you've installed ffmpeg you will need to run it from the command line. Since there's different ways of doing that depending on your ...


4

DVD Video is limited to Standard Def, not High Def (HD). Blu-Ray overcomes that limitation. Alternatively you can use the DVD as a filesystem and play arbitrary media using a computer. But as a media container itself, the DVDs limits are very restricted.


4

You seem to have a flickering light source that is out of sync with the camera's rolling shutter. Traditional lights You should first verify that you are filming in 60/30/24 fps in regions whose power grid uses a 60 Hz frequency, or in 25/50 fps for 50 Hz. If that is impossible to achieve, you can also adapt your shutter speed or angle to be a multiple of ...


4

Those are compression artifacts, where the original video has been compressed and has lost data. Block-based coding for quantisation leads to artifacts like this, as the information depth in the image is too high to be successfully compressed at the level required by the lossy algorithm used. From that Wikipedia page: Lossy data compression involves ...


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