13

It's to leave room before first picture, for slates, countdowns, test signals etc, while still preserving an easy count of running time for the video. Yes, it traces historically to broadcast and in particular videotape. Many tape-based editing systems couldn't deal with 24-hour wraparound, so the next even hour became traditional 'time zero'. I suspect ...


4

I know that Cmd clicking on the time stamp in the left corner alternates between frames and seconds: Thats exactly whats happening here.You switched to frames so After Effects is showing the frame count instead of a second count. Do a Ctrl / Cmd click on the time stamp and you will get seconds: To see all time values in the timeline simply drag the zoom ...


4

FFmpeg's drawtext filter can burn timecodes into frames. edit: I misread the docs before. I saw the timecode option to the filter, and missed seeing that there was a pts available for text expansion. See the edit history for the longer-and-less-useful answer. I eventually got around to trying it, and here's the command line I cobbled together from ...


4

In case someone else comes looking for this, timecode in mp4 and mov files is often a "data" track, and ffmpeg usually drops data tracks. To keep all tracks, I usually use these switches to map tracks from the source to tracks in the destination -map 0:v (video switches) -map 0:a (audio switches) -map 0:d (this keeps the data track) Which also has the ...


3

Streaming formats maintain timestamps for each frame, whether audio or video, which govern when the player ought to present them. Those non-zero big start times usually occur when a snippet is cut out from a longer video and the tool used does not reset the timestamps. Although if this FLV was recorded on its own, then it's strange. In any case, running the ...


3

Apparently, the frames are dropped at the same cadence, but with double frequency. From FFmpeg's timecode drop function, if (fps == 30) { drop_frames = 2; frames_per_10mins = 17982; } else if (fps == 60) { drop_frames = 4; frames_per_10mins = 35964; } .... d = framenum / frames_per_10mins; m = framenum % frames_per_10mins; return framenum ...


3

Video editing software usually DOES come with this ability. After Effects, Premiere, Vegas, etc, all support doing this very simply. Some of them add their own time code rather than time code from meta, so you may have to adjust the start point to match your actual time code, but the end result should still be the same. For example, in Premiere, the ...


3

The Timecode effect (effects>text>timecode) will add a timecode, but it's measured in HH:MM:SS:FF rather than milliseconds. You could do it with an expression by adding a text layer, and applying an expression to the Source Text property. Below is an expression that returns what you want. To apply it, alt-click on the stop watch for the text layers Source ...


3

Some projects use the hours field as a reel/tape/memory card indicator. Many cameras permit setting the TC hours number arbitrarily to support this usage. You could set the hours number in Pro Tools or FCP to conform to such a system if required.


3

Premiere Pro does not currently read audio timecode, I wish it did as it would solve a lot of problems. There are a couple options but either mean longer work flow and or costs money depending on your situation. If you have Tentacle Sync hardware, you get a license for Tentacle Sync Studio for Mac or Tentacle Timecode Tool for PC which can overwrite your ...


2

I know this is a very old Q, but it should be pointed out that a 'negative timecode' makes no sense. The SMPTE frame before 00:00:00:00 is 23:59:59:29. The namespace for drop frame (and non-drop) codes is already well-defined -- no need to postulate negative values. If there are systems or programs that use this notation, they should be rethought.


2

From what I understand 't' is evaluated once. Have you read this: https://ffmpeg.org/ffmpeg-filters.html#zoompan ? Ffmpeg Docs: 9.170.1 Examples Zoom-in up to 1.5 and pan at same time to some spot near center of picture: zoompan=z='min(zoom+0.0015,1.5)':d=700:x='if(gte(zoom,1.5),x,x+1/a)':y='if(gte(zoom,1.5),y,y+1)':s=640x360 Zoom-in up to 1.5 and pan ...


2

Various places I've worked have found different solutions. Some record the LTC from a broadcast video tape to an unused track. Some will reuse a track from an earlier project. The first is slow (1:1), and both are inflexible. Hardware TC generators are flexible, but it's still real-time creation. I offer a free 32-bit Windows utility that can generate an ...


2

You can use an EDL (Edit Decision List) in the CMX3600 format. An EDL is a very simple import/export format from the 1970s, when data was exchanged using floppy disks and videos were stored on tape. It's just a text file and most modern NLEs (including Premiere Pro) can import/export it. (Today there are some variations between NLEs, but that doesn't have to ...


2

As per the Broadcast Engineer's Reference Book, p. 203 This correction will match DF time to real time to within approximately 2.6 frames per day; to eliminate the residual error the timecode generator can be reset each midnight. So, apparently nothing. As far as the "extra" frames, Charles Poynton says, If a timecode sequence is to be maintained ...


2

Just use copy for all streams i.e. ffmpeg -i [filename] -c copy -map 0 [outputDirectory] Edit: Let's switch byte-order ffmpeg -i [filename] -c copy -c:a pcm_s16le -map 0 [outputDirectory]


2

No, they don't have a way to keep it in sync. This is why the timecode is clock based. The idea is that if the clocks are reasonably close, you'll be able to line up multiple cameras across multiple shots once and note their offset. You can then use this as a starting point on other shots that are done at the same time. Clock drift is likely to require ...


2

Use a filter to reduce the framerate beforehand ffmpeg -i in.mpg -vf "fps=24,scale=-2:360,drawtext=timecode='00\:00\:00\:00': r=24" out.mpg


2

FFmpeg only supports timecode in a limited set of formats. They are the MOV family (MOV/MP4/3GP..), MXF family, raw DV and Grass Valley GXF. How the timecode is stored and flagged is specific to the format. MOV stores a DF flag, integer framerate and the timecode as a rate-adjusted integer frame index. MXF does essentially the same.


2

MKV frame timestamps are relative to the start of the cluster. The cluster timestamps, however can be absolute or relative to the beginning of the "presentation". The frame timestamps are the presentation timestamps (PTS) whereas the frames are ordered in the decoding order (DTS). MKV doesn't have explicit DTS. The snippet of the MKV you showed contains a ...


2

You can only cut in-between frames of your video clips. Videos have generally frame rates per second of 24 or 25, maybe 30. Sound files have typically a sample rate per second of 48000. So you could say you can cut a video e.g. 25 times per second and a sound file 48000 times. I usually cut to the nearest frame to the beat of the music. IMHO nobody can tell ...


1

I record conferences all the time, so I end up getting 10's of hours of footage at a time. I have a few tricks that help with syncing: Run all cams all the time. If a full day shoot gets only 3 files per cam, that's a lot less work to sync than 25 files from each cam. Stop and start all cams within the same few seconds. Learn to notice key waveforms. ...


1

First, let me say that I have no idea what Premiere is doing with its values or what a 'tick' means in their terms. I can only speak generally. The video frame rate should match the timecode rate, but for 'drop frame' timecodes the relationship isn't perfectly linear. There are certain timecode numbers that never show up in the sequence -- the ones that are ...


1

Let's call the video frame rate F. And the start time of the overlay t Use ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -i ol.png -filter_complex "[0]trim=0:t,loop=X*F:1:t*F,setpts=N/FRAME_RATE/TB[fol]; [0]trim=t,setpts=N/FRAME_RATE/TB[post] [fol][1]overlay[pre];[pre][post]concat" out.mp4 The loop filter accepts frame index numbers, so you have to ...


1

You can do this upon export from Premiere. Load up your clip, export timeline (use Cineform or Prores for lossless if you'll be re-inserting into another project), and click the "Set Start Timecode" checkbox.


1

You can use ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, like so ffmpeg -i input.mov -c copy -map 0 -dn output.mov The -c copy sees that there's no re-encoding, the -map 0 copies everything over but the -dn disables data tracks - the timecode being a data track.


1

IME, 0.0036% is rather better than average. Consumer gear operates on quite inexpensive crystal oscillators. These oscillators or crystals are not tuned precisely (or they would cost too much), and they don't have extraordinary stability over temperature ranges. Professional gear uses special techniques to keep audio and video gear in synchronization. ...


1

I've had some success with ASFTools and Steeper WMV Repair. Both of these are older tools (Steeper is from 2005) so may not be able to handle later versions of WMV, but they're worth a try.


1

Before I start I'd like to mention that this would be much easier in After Effects. If you plan on doing this more often, you should consider learning AE to be able to do things like that faster. So, to follow your approach I created a transparent layer, put the timecode effect on it and cropped it using the crop effect. It looks like this right now: Since ...


1

I'm not sure about how to set the timecode of the clip from the datestamp of the file but Red Giant have a fantastic plugin called Plural Eyes which does a great job of syncing multiple clips most of the time if the audio is even half decent.


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