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Using ffmpeg, a command line tool, you can use ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -vf select='trunc(mod(t+2,3))',setpts=N/FRAME_RATE/TB -crf 23 out.mp4 The select filter is used on the video stream. This filter evaluates the supplied expression on each frame and keeps the frame if the expression evaluates to a non-zero value. The expression used is trunc(mod(t+2,3)). The ...


3

Import the footage into After Effects. Bring it into a comp and change the speed of the layer either with the speed control for the layer or with time remapping. Make sure the layer has Frame Blending turned on, and that it's on for your final render. Frame blending will blend all of the frames that make up a single frame, so if 20 minutes makes 10 seconds ...


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It is going to depend on which of the two provides a higher quality resize option. If imagemagick's convert is higher quality than the scale of your encoder, then it will do better, if not, then it will be the other way around. The one exception to this will be if there is any resolution dependent alterations made to the content along the way. If for ...


3

Depending on your version of Premiere, there should actually be a speed adjustment from the context menu when you right click on the clip. It may be under a sub-menu depending on version, but it will give you the option of either a % to increase/decrease the speed by or a new time that you want the clip to take.


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Finding specific models is outside the scope of this site as the ideal available models will change regularly, but you will probably want to look at a security camera to fill this roll. Not a lot of cameras are designed to operate reliably in harsh conditions over long periods of time. Outdoor security cameras are. The next biggest problem is going to be ...


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This is a really late response but I just stumbled onto the question. The software you're looking for is Adobe After Effects. Inside After Effects, you'll end up using the effect called "Time Remapping". Open After Effects Import all your frames as an image sequence Create a composition(whatever resolution/framerate you'd like) Drag your image sequence ...


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FFMpeg might do what you need. It's pretty powerful commandline tool to convert video formats, sizes, etc. Here is a clear and simple tutorial for installing FFMpeg and using basic functions Here is a specific SuperUser thread about using it to cut small clips from a larger clip. So is their any video player or software by which i can crop/split video ...


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Assuming these have, or can be given, consecutively numbered file names you can do this easily using ffmpeg, avconv and similar utilities. Most have builds for Mac, Windows and Linux. The choice of frame rate is up to you, and really affects only the total length of the output file (at 30fps, 280000 frames is 2.6 hours; at 24 fps it's 3.24 hours). If you ...


2

You can import all of the images into Photoshop as layers (File>Scripts>Load to Stack). On import you can auto-align the layers (check the box that says auto-align) or following the import you can go to (Edit>Auto Align-Layers). You could then create the video in Photoshop via the Timeline function if you wished - or export the aligned individual layers as ...


2

You can import all the images as a video i.e. an image sequence and then try to stabilize the "video" by selecting a distinctive part of the odometer as your target anchor. The result may still need some manual tweaking especially if there's a huge change in light, but it will be faster than doing it manually. You might have to rename the images to form an ...


2

You don't necessary need to make it the center of the image but always appear at the exact same point in the frame. The center is usually an easy referencing point for that purpose, so why not use that. Obviously the easiest would be to make the photographs in a way that they don't need postpcessing. If this chance has passed already, you can get a (free) ...


2

You are approaching the problem at hand very well, you have however not used the most quality-preserving solution available. I recommend that you take your raw image files and import them into Adobe After Effects as a camera raw sequence. This will let you work with the files directly in their raw format and therefore retaining the most quality. From there, ...


2

There is no easy way I'm aware of. It's really important when shooting a timelapse to use fixed manual exposure so that you get consistent exposure from shot to shot. It's a non-trivial task to get color to match from one image to the next if exposure doesn't match because you have to worry about not only the black point (darkest point) and white point (...


2

There are plugins that adjust exposure over time to reduce flickering in timelapses - GBDeflicker works well. (But it won't change night to day or anything like that). See also: Correcting exposure flickering in time-lapse footage "in post"


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Try "Intervalometer" it works as an overlay app over your stock camera app. You can also try to do your own script with app like "Tasker". BTW: Old version of Camera FV-5 worked too. Unfortunately they implemented a new UI, which doesn't work so well.


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I actually was able to find the answer to my question in point 2. here Simple add the sequence to the After Effects Render Queue: And from there open it in AME, where the preview will work perfectly fine.


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Do you have AE? In AE you can use the color stabilizer effect. Import your project to AE, add the color stabilizer onto the clip, change stabilizer to brightness, qnd choose a point that should be black/really dark


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Assuming you want a 30 fps 2.5m GIF, use ffmpeg -i source.mp4 -vf "select='not(mod(n,trunc(234/2.5)))',palettegen" palette.png and ffmpeg -i source.mp4 -i palette.png -filter_complex "[0]select='not(mod(n,trunc(234/2.5)))',setpts=N/30/TB[v];[v][1]paletteuse" survey.gif


1

That is something called Starlapse. In short it is a form of time-lapse, as you use the same techniques to shoot it but you use a different method to produce the final video. there are many ways in doing this using different programs and plugins. All you need to do is do a search (in a very popular web search program that rhymes with "poodle" and there are ...


1

I ain't sure if this will work but better than nothing! Here two of my approaches to this problem: Warp Stabilization Software such as Mocha, AE and many others have Warp Stabilization. What is means is that it can automatically stabilize the clip based on the frames and it somewhat relates to Machine Learning approach to Big Data. Converting to 24fps You ...


1

'Not sure if it works well if the camera is not fixed in one position.' Correct. If you're doing time-lapse you need to have the camera stabilised somehow, or it's going to look wobbly AF. If the camera is moving in real time, then when you speed it up it will be moving 30 times as fast, so something that might look like a slow pan turns into a whip pan. ...


1

In order to get a smoother timelapse you should shoot at a higher frequency. If you want you can always blend between two images results in somewhat more smoothenes. The first video however is made with a totally different technique, there we only have a few videos and use morphing to get from one image to the next. This technique interpolates the colours ...


1

In iMovie you can change the speed of a clip by selecting it in the timeline and then clicking on the icon that looks like a speedometer: Then click on the "Speed:" popup menu and choose "Fast" or "Custom". The "Custom" setting lets you choose how much faster to make it (like 200%, or 50%).


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Another possibility, depending on the shot / lighting: Make two comps- one is your time lapse, and one is your two subjects playing in real time, not time lapsed. Mask (and feather) around the subjects, so the surrounding is moving quickly, but they are breathing and blinking in normal time. Slightly crazier idea: Track the parts of your subjects that ...


1

The problem isn't the remote timing, it's the rate at which data can be written to the SD or CF card. The camera can shoot a bunch of images quickly in burst mode because it stores them in an internal buffer for a short while before it writes them to memory. However, this pace of data acquisition is not sustainable for long periods of time because the ...


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I've done this a couple times. My software choice is VirtualDub (free), and then After Effects for some cleanup (stabilization). The stabilization can be done by YouTube if you don't own After Effects. Basically just download VirtualDub, then import the image sequence into it. It'll automatically import all the photos after you select the first one. Make ...


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I followed Henderson's advice and wrote a little script to resize the images: $ cat jpg2mp4.sh test -d "$1" || exit tmpdir=$(mktemp -d -p .) counter=0 find $1 -iname '*.jpg' | while read jpg do convert -resize 1440x1080 $jpg $tmpdir/IMG_$(printf "%04d" $counter).JPG counter=$((counter + 1)) done echo ffmpeg -i $tmpdir/IMG_%4d.JPG test.mp4 ...


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The problem is that a sequence of images is not a video file. In order to convert it to a video format such as h.264, it has to load an entire group of pictures (probably somewhere around 15 of them) and then perform a whole bunch of calculations to determine how the images are related to each other. It then uses that information to determine what to ...


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