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5

What you are missing is that not every frame is stored as a picture. A large number of frames are stored simply by keeping track of what changed from the previous picture. If you think about most video, not a whole lot is actually changing since the majority of the scene stays the same or moves in a similar pattern. By describing only the changes, the ...


4

mini DV is already digital format. The bitrate is 25Mbps. So, 1 hour occupies approximately 11 Gigabytes


4

Film is specifically a medium in which each frame is photographically exposed to capture the image. It comes in a variety of formats, but the key property is that it must photographically capture the image through photosensitive film. Magnetic media, regardless of being analog or digital, such as that used in MiniDV, Digital8, Hi-8 and even VHS tapes is ...


4

Although @stib's advice is sound, I disagree with "to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality". Cameras have to compress on-the-fly, so they use constrained baseline mode, which is to say, they skip most of the tricks that H.264 codec uses to efficiently compress videos. If space isn't a pressing concern, keep them as-...


3

If your only goal is to save storage space and you never plan on editing or re-encoding the files again, you probably won't notice any change in quality. However, if you plan to edit or re-encode to another format in the future, I'd strongly recommend against re-encoding to H.265 now. Every time you decode and re-encode video to the same or a different ...


3

Don't trust any hard drive to be reliable! Always backup your footage, you can not trust any HDD, doesn't matter how reputable the manufacturer is. There are always monday batches. HDDs WILL fail at some point, so ALWAYS make backups. Bear in mind that you might find a RAID solution nice to use but that's not a real backup, backup drives are disconnected and ...


3

It is approximately 11GB per hour, though I do tend to round up a bit when I make my calculations. Digital Rebellion has a handy Video Space Calculator on their website (also available as an iOS app). You can select the format, frame rate, and video length.


2

To answer the headline question, specifically about the medium: No. Tape is not film. It may substitute for or be notionally equivalent to film in a more general sense. But the body of your question makes it unclear exactly what you're asking. Could you edit it to make it more coherent?


2

Any camera with an HDMI or SDI output can can stream via wifi using a Teradek Cube (http://teradek.com/pages/cube). This setup will allow you to monitor and record via iOS or computer. It also supports remote recording over the internet (decoder needed). In addition to WiFi, Terdek also supports 3G/4G/LTE cellular networks via a USB modem.


2

I don't have experience with that particular Samsung camcorder, but I did do some long term recording on an older Samsung camcorder. My camcorder had a time lapse mode that allowed it to capture a frame every minute or so. It would record while plugged in to A/C power. Although the camera used the FAT32 filesystem with 2GB file limits, it was able to span ...


2

I've shot live events for the past 5 years, and had a few friends get on (and actually pretty far in) both American Idol and The Voice. There is a series of auditions way before contestants ever get in front of a studio camera, let alone a TV audience. Most auditions are not filmed, unless it is recorded by the casting directors/producers purely for their ...


2

Personally, I use a 12 TB RAID array composed of 5 3TB drives. If any one of them fails, I don't lose any data, but if 2 or more fail at the same time, I am up a creak. Other plans can consist of RAID 6, which allows for 2 drives to fail, but at the cost of two drives worth of storage capacity rather than one (so 5 3TB drives would only give you 9TB of ...


2

Only you can answer if it is worth it, because nobody else understands the economics of your project. Like how much video you have, and how important quality it. Hard drives are cheep, unless you have thousands of hours of video. Video compression isn't lossless, meaning you will never get a higher quality recording than you have now. Every time you ...


1

I found a solution to my problem: Ffmpeg can use a http stream as input: ffmpeg -i YoutubeVideoOnlyURLHere -i YoutubeAudioOnlyURLHere -c copy -map 0:0 -map 1:0 Path/to/outputFile.mp4 You can get the needed URLs from youtube-dl -f bestvideo,bestaudio --get-url https:www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXXXXXXXXXX


1

I am not sure why you end up with duplicates. However you might be interested in having a look at the proxy workflow from Felipe. It probably can help you to get rid of duplicates and conserve space.


1

While it doesn't cover all your criteria, I use a program called Total Commander for most of my file management needs and it works well for working with a very large number of files and huge file sizes. Among it's features, it is able to do a directory synchronization that determines the differences between to folders, either by filesize/date or by content (...


1

As others have mentioned, you seem to be confusing resolution and frame rate. There are variable resolution systems for things like VR for foviated rendering (where the area being looked at is rendered in higher resolution than the surrounding areas) and there are also some large format displays where the resolution of the overall visual display may not be ...


1

You can't get "dynamic resolution" because essentially that would mean that some of the time you used a 4K display (for example) to show a 2160P image and some of the time you displayed a 1080P image by pixel doubling - so either way it's 4K but what you could gain (IF there were such a Codec) is an increase in the compression, and that's where you should ...


1

Try Resilio Sync it will push or pull or both files from a server, pc etc and keep them all updated.


1

Leave them as they are. If storage space is limited you could recompress them, but given that the files coming from the DSLR are already compressed, to get an appreciable size reduction you would have to throw away a lot of quality. As you're planning to edit them in the future - meaning another transcoding - this would be a last resort. Buy more hard ...


1

I'm not allowed to comment on the first post, so I'll put my comment here... I agree, pretty much all the crashplan/backblaze/etc... services do what you're looking for. I personally use SpiderOak for privacy reasons, but there are lots of options in this area. If you want to roll your own (open source), you can go with something like Amanda (http://www....


1

I've used Backblaze for this. I understand that CrashPlan Pro and other similar services work in the same way. Basically, you install the software (free download), do some setup, and then it just runs in the background. Every time you create a new file or modify an existing one, it will (at some later point when there's less activity on your system) just ...


1

You can delete Render files by going: Sequence > Delete Render Files Or by using third-party programs.


1

My best guess would be that it's a bit of a combination of both. For shows like America's Got Talent (and, I'm sure, other "Got Talent" shows), the acts go through a "Producer's Audition" before anyone gets to see the real judges. The producers filter out a majority of the applicants and send a small number through to be shown on TV. My assumption is that ...


1

The first thing is to separate your source assets from your projects. Source assets are the biggest things and should never change. They are generally best placed on a NAS RAID array on gigabit Ethernet or better (10G+ fiber links are nice if you can afford them, but not strictly needed). Each editor can then pull down whatever source files they need ...


1

There is the Eyefi product line which basically wraps a small wifi chip together with a small arm SoC into an SD package with some limited internal storage. http://www.eyefi.com/products/prox2 They do work but the range is rather limited and you have to use their software in order to use them. Also only SD cards in their product line which aren't used in ...


1

I'm not sure this is on topic here, but... Unless you're doing a lot of simultaneous access to the partitions or folders, there should be no discernible performance difference. It's all head movement and caching.


1

For DV footage, anything below 4.7 minutes per gigabyte is going to start being sub-standard for editing. That's the standard data rate for lossy compressed DV footage. Each generation of compression and the lower quality you make the compression, the less suitable for video editing it becomes. If you use a highly lossy format to store the video, after ...


1

I'm not sure that it would be ideal, but Lightroom is able to provide keyword and cataloging support for a variety of video clip types. It isn't expressly designed for it, but it's a relatively cheap option that may be able to handle your needs. As stib was nice enough to point out, Adobe Bridge also can do similar cataloging if you have the broader Adobe ...


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