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You ask what it does: Speedgrade is a color grading / correcting tool. Davinci Resolve is another, and there are others still. They allow you to adjust the characteristics of a video on a shot-by-shot basis. It's never necessary to use any color grading tool, but you'd do so when you want to match scenes from different sources or shot under different ...


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That's the moiré pattern, which is caused when the camera debayers an image with fine details: Wikipedia about the Bayer Filter (see the Artifacts section) Many cameras have this problem, some more, some less. The best solution is to get to know the sensibility of your camera regarding moiré and - when you have objects like bricks, roofs, fine-detailed ...


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In turns out all I had to do was grade in DaVinci Resolve and right click on the graded clip's thumbnail in the color environment and select Generate 3D LUT (CUBE). Then in Adobe Premiere CC add the Lutemtri effect to an adjustment layer, expand basic correction, Browse for Input LUT.


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It might not be possible to do it that way. The best way I'm familiar with is actually the other way around. You start a project in Adobe Premiere Pro Use the "Direct-Link" function to import your Premiere project into Speedgrade. Now, all editorial changes from premiere will update into Speedgrade. A lot of Speedgrade functions will disappear (raw ...


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It's called moiré. The main enemy here is sharpness. Try to play with it... But now, when you know the term, I bet you will find solution shortly. Good luck!


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