5

This is called stroboscopic effect. It refers to when the sample rate is synchronized or very slightly out of sync resulting in a much slower representation of the motion that results from taking a picture that is at the same point or slightly advanced point in a subsequent cycle of a higher frequency cyclic motion. You can actually do the same exact thing ...


5

Looks like text moving to a "Motion Tracking" effect. Basically it finds and follows 1 or more points in a picture then moves the text accordingly. If you use 2 or more points you can track the 3d angle also. Examples: 2D position only 3D position, scale and angle


4

You need a camera with a relatively large sensor and a fast lens. What you are seeing is actually a property of optics called Depth of Field. Only a certain distance from the camera can be in focus at any given point for a given aperture and focal length. The degree of how out of focus it appears is also relative to the size of the image being projected (...


4

For video editing the Hollywood standard is AVID, however smaller production houses and indie filmmakers tend to use Adobe Premiere. The nice thing about Premiere, in your case, is that it dynamic links with After Effects where you can do motion graphics, composting and basic visual effects such as green screen removal among other things. To explain these ...


4

Oh, but you're very wrong that in 1994 CGI wasn't around. The very film you use as an example had a very extensive VFX and CGI credits list. In 1993, Flame was already around being used on Silicon Graphics stations. It evolved into the software currently owned by Autodesk, and still one of the mostly used VFX suites in Hollywood productions. One year ...


3

What you're seeing is an inherent problem with sensors that use "rolling shutter". There are tradeoffs in sensor technology among speed, sensitivity, and size, and using a sequential line readout with continuous exposure is a popular choice that's a good compromise for many situations. Unfortunately yours isn't one of those. What you need is what's known as ...


3

Shallow depth of field or focus.


3

Here's one idea for the effect, which you can even do in Premiere: Get a live-action camera shot where the camera is slowly trucking forward. In post-production, create a title that has at least one letter with a hole in it (A, B, D, O, P, Q, etc.). Lay the title over the top of the trucking-in shot. Animate the scale and position of the title over several ...


3

This is accomplished during shooting and is not an editorial effect. An set of DSLRs (digital still cameras) arranged in an arc are triggered to all take a shot at the same instant. The individual frames are strung into a sequence and treated as a motion clip. There are lots of examples of this on the web. You can do similar things using CGI, but it's not a ...


3

Assuming you're using a layer based compositor (like After Effects) you need two layers. The top layer has the half-painted box with the hand swiping over it. The bottom has the fully painted box, and no hand, but everything else is the same as the first shot. Now you need to make a matte that corresponds to the trailing edge of the hand, and extending (...


3

Although it looks like a slit-scan effect similar to the Tom Baker era Dr. Who titles, in this case, the effect was very simply made with mylar - a reflective plastic. Due to time and budget constraints, there wasn't much they could do, so they made a tunnel out of mylar and flew the camera through it. They apparently had a lot of mylar left from making ...


2

Tough question, and I imagine that those effects may be combinations of many other effects (probably in a 3D package given the context of the video itself). Barnaby Roper has a pretty interesting skill set, and we could try forever guessing what he did without getting it exactly right. That said, you should be able to accomplish a similar effect with ...


2

While I'm not aware of the process used for that particular film, one easy way to do it is to film the matte painting, then film the smoke against a green or blue background and composite the smoke over the footage of the matte painting in the computer. I've also seen matte paintings where a large section is left unpainted. Then live action (or animated) ...


2

It depends on whether you just want to learn animation or actually need a diploma. Many online sources won't issue one, so you will 'just' learn how to do it, but not have any trustworthy certificate. If you just want to learn, there are so many good sites that offer courses and trainings (most of them commercially), it depends on what kind of animation you ...


2

Editing and Visual Effects (Special Effects aren't done in a computer) are two very different disciplines. Its possible to edit in a VFX package, but your best bet is two different pieces of software. As for "what software is used for hollywood VFX", the answer is that Nuke, After Effects and Fusion all have hollywood credits to their name. You can get a ...


2

A tube is clipped to the side of the sax. At one end of the tube is the little flame. At the other end, off frame, a technician holds a small canister of gas equipped with a valve. The valve helps the technician control the amount of gas that gets in the tube. When s/he gets the signal, s/he opens the valve and lets more gas in the tube, which makes the ...


2

I would suggest working in reverse. Start out by arranging all the images the way you want them to appear at the end and set position keyframes on all of them at the end of the sequence. Then move to the beginning of the sequence and set keyframes on the positions and start dragging them all out of frame. You can then drag the starting keyframes around to ...


2

If you are interested in fire overlay, than it can be done with different ways: Projection of fire on the glass in front of actor Filming fire and person on the same part of film, and only after that was made manifestation of a film. If you are about morphing of face, it probably was made same way, how it was made in Michael Jackson music video "Black &...


2

Yeah that was actually the best opening ceremony ever... Doing something like this yourself is a hefty task, but first, here's what you would need: A software for tracking A software for modeling / animating (optionally something for compositing / color grading) Luckily, Blender (which is free) can do all those things, but has quite a steep learning-curve. ...


2

Chameleons do have some pretty wild colors they can change into, and the process is extremely advanced, requiring physicists and biologists to fully understand how it works; check out this video for how it works. Personal note: Something this advanced doesn't happen by random chance. Anyway, my personal opinions aside, it appears to me, this video was ...


1

It honestly appears like that was added in post. I see nothing in the sax itself the lighting effect from it seems like a general effect, not actual fire (way too bright for such a small flame). This could be done using a mix of motion tracking the sax, placing a special effects fire video at the center and then using either a pre-made lighting effect or ...


1

If you have the logo or title in Black and white then you will simply mix between them as they mix differently on the video background. But the trick is making sure that your editor can do "layer math". Perhaps you've noticed in Photoshop or other paint programs that you can do more than simply Mix 2 images together (like a dissolve)? You want to look for a ...


1

You could try the HitFilm Express 4, they have the sci-fi pack (25usd) which contains the VFX you want and specific tutorials for lightsaber (https://hitfilm.com/express/the-force) and it works on mac :) Link: https://hitfilm.com/store/hitfilm-4-express


1

You might be able to achieve such a look with the Clouds generator from Apple Motion. (This is different from the one that ships with FCPX.) But you can create a Final Cut Pro Generator from it using the settings below. If you set the 1st, 2nd and 3rd layer strength to 0 and the 4th layer strength to 1.0 you'll get the right sort of frequencies. You'll then ...


1

I don't think there is a name to the effect. If I were to describe it, it would just be "the effect of a shell of an object cracking up and falling / peeling away in fractured pieces". I am sure you already know the compositing side of things, where you do the colour grading, atmospheric effects and such in After Effects. For the 3D software I work ...


1

I'm unsure if there is a specific "official" word for this effect. I guess I would call it frequency synchronisation. This effect appears whenever the framerate (e.g. frequency your camera takes a picture) of you camera matches the frequency of another recurring action. It doesn't have to be the exact same frequency but a multiple of it. So if the rotor of ...


1

Mulvya is right - it's shallow depth of field, achieved by having a lens with a wide open aperture, corresponding to a low F stop number.


1

Fake it. Use your preferred compositing application to turn down the exposure value over a specified region. For example, if you're talking about a round spotlight affecting a flat region, create an appropriately shaped ellipse, feather it to taste, and turn down the exposure. If instead you're talking about volumetric lighting (like shining a light ...


1

What you're talking about is essentially a negative light. (There's a scene in the Simpson's where Moe doesn't want his fancy customers seeing Homer and the guys, so he unscrews a lightbulb and it casts negative light over them, leaving them in total blackness.) Unfortunately, they don't exist in real life. So your options are: Light things in such a way ...


1

I've got another idea, but it's a little kooky. You light the WHOLE SCENE with spotlights - the fewer the better. On the key spotlight, you add a gel that has an opaque black circle on it. Then as you move that around, that section of darkness will pass over parts of the set/props/actors. For a more focused spot, you could use a bright digital projector ...


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