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You already stated your options and you only have one that would work: you need a frame grabber. A frame grabber is a specialized chipset that does a very specific task. Sometimes such devices are called application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC). They basically do only one thing and they do it very well. The chipset that controls the USB on your ...


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The short answer to your question is "no". The sample rate of video is typically measured in MHz or GHz. If you have a 1080p24 signal at 8 bits per pixel, the actual frame is 2750 x 1125 pixels (according to digital test equipment manufacturer Kramer). Multiplied by a 24 fps refresh rate, this results in 74,250,000 pixels / second. Multiplied by 10 bits ...


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I've found 2 useful references: LEVIN, A., ZOMET, A., PELEG, S., AND WEISS, Y. 2004. Seamless image stitching in the gradient domain. In European Conference on Computer Vision, 377–389. and PÉREZ, P., GANGNET, M., AND BLAKE, A. 2003. Poisson image editing. ACM Transactions on Graphics (SIGGRAPH ’03), 313– 318.


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It is possible and works in a similar manner. What's different is that normal pixel values in video are always positive, whereas it's normal for audio to go both positive and negative several thousand times per second. If you have a copy of the axes without the spectrum, you can overlay the image with the spectrum on top of the image of the axes and set the ...


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Not with those boxes, but the broadcast industry version of video over IP (SMPTE 2022-6 and the 2110 suite) can do this as they are actually IP Multicast based. The gotcha is that they typically run uncompressed so you are looking at up to several Gb/s per multicast flow (4k60 you are looking at 12Gb/s), and you really want non blocking switching fabric. ...


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I think the easiest way is with the Spectral Frequency Display. Sounds like coughs, air conditioners and so on appear as blobs or lines that you can either erase or reduce in volume. Much more effective than EQ, since you can target all the frequencies and the exact timespan. From Adobe: "The spectral display is perfect for removing unwanted sounds, such as ...


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If you have Audition, try using the background noise removal effect. If you capture a clip of solely the audio you want to remove, Audition will identify that frequency and remove it wherever it appears. Might need manual correction since sometimes it the reduction at those frequencies can be extreme.


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i would attempt this by trying to find the frequency of the cough and then nuking it with EQ, turning the EQ on and off when needed via automation. You might have to dip the overall level for a moment too if its still too bad. I'm guessing that in future having a second mic might help also so you can cut to that and it might get a better signal of the ...


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A still image doesn't have any temporal redundancy to exploit - it is a snapshot of a single point of time! Also, the quantization parameter will be low. Video compression uses higher quantization parameters since each individual frame is seen for a fraction of a second, so in a normal playback mode, the user doesn't get to focus on the details within each ...


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If your axes are baked in to the video, then, no, you cannot easily remove them because they have replaced, not added to, the underlying image. One way to remove them would be to create a mask that exactly covers each axis and use that mask to copy and average pixels on either side of the axis. Then place the averaged pixels where the axis used to be. This ...


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It does not make sense to speak of the size of an encoded frame in an inter-coded video stream, which is typical of MPEG-X videos. I-frames are self-contained but P- and B- frames are predicted frames and the final decoded result uses data from various inputs. On the other hand, the size of a single Group of Pictures (GOP) may be a meaningful measure. The ...


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There are two main concepts that I think are key here. The first is learning about signal paths and what the functions of each piece of equipment does along the way. The second is understanding the signals themselves and how they work. In video, this can be particularly important since many signals are actually the same on different cables. In both cases,...


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