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5

There are two possible problems, first is that your camera does not appear to have SDXC support. 32GB is the limit of the SD and SDHC file system used on lower capacity memory cards. To move to 64GB, you have to move to exFat which your camera may not support, so the card may simply be too big. It is also possible the card is simply too slow to support ...


3

Have you try to go to the product web site and check? http://gopro.com/support/articles/recording-time-in-each-video-setting I know it is about Hero2, but i think the values will not change much. Be aware fully charged battery will power the camera for no more than 3 hours


3

Here is some reasoning based on numbers: You don't need a fast card for video. It is generally advised to use at least class 6 for video recording on a consumer AVCHD device: Max recording bit rate of AVCHD 2.0 is 28 Mbit/s and minimum write speed of a class 6 card is 48 Mbit/s, this should provide enough headroom even with an almost full card. ...


2

When taking photos or shooting video, the image data is offloaded to a high speed internal cache for processing. There is a limited amount of space available in this cache and so to empty it out, files are written off to the memory card to make room for more pictures or frames of video. If you take photos or video at a rate that exceeds the memory card's ...


2

What speed does my SD-card need? The manual states that: So any card that can continually write 100 Megabit per second (so around 13 MegaByte per second) should be fast enough for recording 4K. For photography, there's no hard number: usually, it's the faster, the better, especially when shooting series of pictures in RAW. However, it will only have ...


2

You don't mention which Transcend card you bought but the benchmarks here indicate that the write throughput performance of Transcend cards are a little under 10 Mbps (naively I assume this is true for their brand of SD cards but I could be wrong). Strictly speaking the SD Card class rating seems to imply 10 Mbps minimum for 1080p recording so that may ...


1

Most devices use memory formatted as FAT32, which gives you a 4GB file size limit, so a recording is broken up across multiple files. For Sony products, Catalyst Browse is normally the software used to re-combine the files: https://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/catalystbrowse Normally you would import the files off the card using that, then select the files ...


1

You could try a new card. Could be the issue. My guess it's the camera and the heatsink on the sensor. Try a different card first to see if that solves it. Card's can go bad. But with the Canon line (and all DSLR cameras really) do have issues with overheating- especially as they age. If a new card doesnt fix it, you can try to service the camera, ...


1

I use an app called "Black Magic Disk Speed Test" to determine the read/write speeds of my various cards and disks which has the added benefit of also giving a go/no go status on the various standards (such as 1080p@30fps). Also, most of the time you can find user submitted images on Amazon that are screenshots of this (or similar) apps and see how users are ...


1

The class of a memory card often deals with the reading speed of the card, even if it should deal with the write speed. It is relatively common for a card to have much quicker read times than write times, but since the read time is fast enough, they slap a faster class label on it than it can actually write. You will need to get a class 10 card that ...


1

For one thing, that chart doesn't list 1920x1080 @ 50 fps, which is what you're shooting. It lists 1920x1080 at 24, 25, and 30. You can assume that you'll get around half the recording time listed when you double the frame rate. But that should still get you around 44 minutes on an otherwise empty 32 GB card. The fact that you didn't suggests that your ...


1

Typically the problem likely isn't the SD card speed. Depending on the camera it's likely limited because of file size or import taxation. Most cameras use FAT32 as the file system on the SD card, which caps you out at 4GiB, so when you record enough footage to slam into that ceiling the camera will stop. Based on the Canon 6D we have in the office you can ...


1

As the docs say, you need the Blackmagic DeckLink SDK and you need to configure with the appropriate --extra-cflags and --extra-ldflags. On Windows, you need to run the IDL files through widl If so, run ffmpeg -re -i rtmp://server/live/streamname -c:v rawvideo -pix_fmt uyvy422 -vf scale=720x576 -c:a pcm_s16le -ar 48000 -ac 2 -f decklink "Device" ...


1

According to the SD association, Class 2 SD cards have a minimum writing speed of 2 MB/S. That is not sufficient for HD recording, let alone Full HD. Even though that is only the minimum speed, I don't think the SD card will be nearly good enough. If you already have the camera and the SD card though, why not try it out for yourself? Worst thing that can ...


1

You shouldn't notice in major downgrades in quality from a slower card (which I'm assuming is the main difference between the "expensive" cards and "normal" cards you mention). Higher speeds are required for newer cameras (like the more recent GoPros) that shoot in a much higher resolution and/or frame rate that need to be able to write a lot of information ...


1

If you have success some times, and then not others, one source can be spikes in the time to write. Some solutions are to make sure the card is recently formatted, thus all ready to write to, and no way near full, so there is plenty of space to lay down large chunks of data. If you do the above and never have success, it could be too low a class card, and/...


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