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The short answer is: You don't pick a color space for your RAW material based on what kind of monitor you're using. A color pipeline is a very complicated series of mathematical conversions, which is heavily dependent upon: The operating system's color management settings, such as .icc device profiles from manufacturers, and/or calibration software. The ...


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This camera can't shoot RAW for still, not talking about video. And according to the specifications this camera can shoot 640x480x30 which is not very much by contemporary measures. For shooting RAW video you should jump to much higher class cameras. About DSLRs I found on this site sample table with cheapest DSLRs for RAW video:


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Copyright law here says that the person who shoots the footage owns the footage. The only way to change this is if you sign a work for hire contract which says that the production company owns the copyright and that they'll pay you in exchange for your work and copyright. If they didn't pay you then they breached their contract. If there was no contract then ...


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I'd pick something that looks flat and unsaturated. Those are usually the ones designed to retain detail. If you see clog or slog2, those are good. Rec 709 will throw out info, so don't use that. What should inform this decision? Trial and error. A lut is really just a starting point for your grade. Try some different ones out. If it absolutely ...


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Using After Effects this is not an issue. After Effects has CameraRAW support and by that also support importing DNG sequences. You import them just as you would any other image sequence. Then simply make the sequence into a composition and add it to the render queue. AFAIK After Effects has the OpenEXR plugin integrated since CS5.5. In case I'm wrong you ...


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In Premiere, you can align clips based on audio by putting the clips on separate tracks, selecting them both, right-clicking on one, and choosing, "Synchronize." As far as "programs to compare edits with raw footage," DaVinci Resolve has a pretty robust conform process that lets you play a reference video along with any xml you've got from Premiere (or FCPX,...


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Y4M has no timestamps, only framerate in its header. So, if your source has any variability in its framerate, you'll see a shift in apparent timestamp in the Y4M. e.g. n src y4m 0 0 0 1 0.04 0.04 2 0.07 0.08 3 0.12 0.12 4 0.21 0.16 5 0.24 0.20 6 0.27 0.24 ... Over a long period, these perturbations ...


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It highly depends on your Bit-depth and scene and post-production. If you're trying to maximize for dynamic range and avoid clipping highlights for example, you should reduce contrast as much as possible (and also expose for the highlights). However, by doing that you might lose details in the midtones (separation of colors and luma), which might lead to ...


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This is most likely a compression issue from chroma subsampling and 8-bit log footage. Log footage does have very little contrast and saturation so that it does not clip. However, that means that your colors are compressed into a small range of possible values. By applying a LUT (or adding contrast and saturation) afterwards, you basically reverse that but ...


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Here's a method that should, in principle, work. It assumes VAVA interleaving and for somewhat efficient processing requires the packet sizes for both video and audio having a reasonably large greatest common divisor. The examples below assume a video packet size of 1382400 bytes and audio of 7680 bytes. As it happens, the former is exactly 180 times the ...


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If your system has external SAS, you can either buy an older LTO Tape Drive System, such as an LTO-5, or rent one. Or go for an LTO-6 or 7 drive. Linear tape really is the best choice for a number of production environments which is why so many post houses have adopted it for footage back up. The tapes have large capacity, are enterprise secure, have ...


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Raw video is just that - a raw dump of video content payload - there is no packetization or metadata. Output to Y4M for a format with metadata ffmpeg -r 50 -i test.ts -pix_fmt yuv420p -vf "setpts=PTS-STARTPTS" -y test.y4m


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Use ffmpeg -i in.MOV -an -vcodec rawvideo -pix_fmt yuv420p rawbitstream.yuv ffmpeg -s 640x480 -i rawbitstream.yuv -vf select="not(mod(n+1\,2))" -c:v rawvideo -vsync 0 -an even.yuv ffmpeg -f rawvideo -s 640x480 -pix_fmt yuv420p -i even.yuv -c:v libx264 -preset ultrafast -profile:v high -qp 1 even.mp4


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No, if you don't record in raw, you can't get back to it. That's why people go through the headaches of recording in RAW. RAW is the actual photosite exposure data and isn't actually a usable image on it's own. Imaging sensors don't pick up all colors on each individual pixel. Some pixels pick up red, others blue, others green. Some fancy designs may ...


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Turns out the answer is yes. Such format is called CinemaDNG and is used for professional video production since 2009. Here's the spec for the format: http://download.macromedia.com/pub/labs/cinemadng/cinemadng_p1_spec_091009.pdf Among other things it supports: Integer sensor values of any bit depth from 8 to 32 bits Arbitrary size color filter arrays ...


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To extract the moving things, I'd try a difference matte. There's a tutorial on doing it in After Effects here and another one here. You'll need to somehow extract the static background, probably by averaging a few (or several) frames of it together. Then use the techniques described above to subtract out the static stuff from the moving stuff. (Maybe a ...


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Camera raw sounds like it is effectively similar to RAW because it is describing the light data without any corrections. What comes in on the sensor is written out, but it does sound like it may be applying the filter, just using a mix of 1:1:1 for the color resolution. It's theoretically possible to work backwards from this to the full colors, but you may ...


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