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27

As of December 2018, Adobe Creative Cloud aps, such as Premier, After Effects and Adobe Media Encoder give you the ability to encode in ProRes without any post-hoc conversion. If you don't use Adobe CC aps or want a free, open source tool, ffmpeg can encode video using ProRes, and runs cross-platform. This ffmpeg command: ffmpeg -i input.avi -c:v ...


13

tl;dr: Since Youtube reencodes all videos regardless of the upload format, it really isn't that important. Just export your video with a high bitrate to preserve quality. Also see my answer here regarding quality loss caused by Youtube. Long answer: Each reencoding of a video to a compressed format lowers the quality. Usually, that means you'll lose quality ...


7

YouTube will re-encode whatever you give it. VP9 is currently too slow to encode. So the best choice is to either: Give it the original footage, or if it is not accepted by YouTube or is too big to upload, then... Re-encode to H.264 ffmpeg ffmpeg will accept just about any input and will provide a great quality output. Development is very active, so it is ...


6

Well going by the numbers h264 has a lesser bit-depth and color accuracy than ProRes 422. PR422 has 10bit and 4:2:2 chroma sub-sampling, h264 has 8bit and 4:2:0 unless you encode in the Hi422P Intra profile which isn't very well supported in the wild but offers 10bit and 4:2:2. So in that case I don't think you will have any difference what so ever between ...


5

Has anyone done or seen any tests comparing Apple ProRes 422 with high-bitrate H.264? No, but I can tell you that x264 can get as close to lossless as you want (or even mathematically lossless, with -qp 0). x264 can produce h.264 streams in 4:2:0, 4:2:2, or 4:4:4 YUV colorspaces, at 8 or 10 bits per component. (It can also do RGB, but unless you're doing ...


4

No, officially, ProRes is not a registered codec for the ISOBMFF family, of which MP4 is a member.


3

This is the command line I have used to encode ProRes 4444. If you do not include -bits_per_mb you will get low res results in Windows 10. Many posts do not mention this little aspect. ffmpeg -y -f mov -i input-file.mov -vcodec prores_ks -pix_fmt yuva444p10le -profile:v 4444 -bits_per_mb 8000 -s 1920x1080 output-file.mov


3

I've tried a bunch of front ends for ffmpeg and finally settled on Tencoder. Widows only. It has a preset for ProRes and is very easy to customize so you can crete setting for often used formats or settings. It is multithreaded and allows you to do batch processing.


3

On Windows, I recommend FootageStudio 4K. It is a commercial converter (not cheap) that supports many professional formats, including ProRes.


3

I've had no problems producing prores 422 HQ .mov files with ffmpeg on my Windows machine for Mac-encumbered clients, including delivery to TV Networks for broadcast. I have had some problems with prores 4444 but only when the files have alpha channels, however that bug seems to have been fixed recently. I don't know if anyone has done any head to head ...


3

I found the following explanation on the ffmpeg wiki: Fmpeg comes with 3 different prores encodes: "prores", "prores_ks" (formerly named "prores_kostya") and "prores_aw" (formerly named "prores_anatolyi"). In our testing we've used the "prores" and the "prores_ks" encoders and found "prores_ks" to be the best encoder to use. It is the only one ...


3

I'd pick something that looks flat and unsaturated. Those are usually the ones designed to retain detail. If you see clog or slog2, those are good. Rec 709 will throw out info, so don't use that. What should inform this decision? Trial and error. A lut is really just a starting point for your grade. Try some different ones out. If it absolutely ...


2

I would use ffmpeg. Just write a sript in any scripting language you prefer and tell ffmpeg to encode new files depending on the total duration of the source file and let it only encode a certain amount of time. You can completely automate this sort of workflow with ffmpeg.


2

My guess would be that AfterEffects is assuming something about the audio format which Quicktime is handling correctly but AE is not. Check your format settings; you might need to specify a different byte ordering (also called "byte swapping") or tell it to be explicitly 16-bit instead of, say, 24-bit. In Quicktime you can see what the audio format is via ...


2

Looks to be an encoder deficit, probably due to the rapid transition in the alpha from 1 to 0 in the border regions. Outputting to VP9 with alpha produces a clean result as does outputting to prores without alpha. Outputting with an uniform alpha i.e. whole alpha plane reset to 0 or 0.5 or 1 also produces a clean result. It's not a scaler issue as rawvideo ...


2

Definitely proRes 422HQ. While you won't gain anything by encoding in a higher quality codec, what you will do is avoid losing more. Proxy codecs are just that: stand-ins for the real content, their job is not to faithfully encode the material, it's to be lightweight and easy to play, so you can swap in the full quality copy later. Whoever it was that ...


1

FFmpeg does have 12 bit pixel formats but the prores_ks encoder is limited to 10 bits. The 4444XQ profile features higher bitrates. Open a ticket at trac.ffmpeg,org, if you like.


1

1) your Panasonic footage will be H.264; GoPro may be H.264 or H.265. These are inter-frame codecs whereas ProRes is an intra-frame codec (each frame is coded standalone and doesn't depend on other frames for decoding). So, you should consider a higher bitrate to maintain source quality. 2) FFmpeg does allow you to set a custom quantizer but by default it ...


1

Ok, so your input is full-range (pc, bt709) which is unusual, so let's try to correct that. ffmpeg -i ffmpeg.MOV -vf scale=in_range=pc:out_range=tv -c:v prores -c:a copy prores_auto.mov


1

A1: Links like these mention that ProRes 'bakes in' the white balance (as opposed to storing it as separate metadata): blackmagicdesign.com forum ; reduser.net forum ; reduser.net forum ; cinematography.com forum ; bmcuser.com archive (I am surprised this is not more obviously stated on the web anywhere - it seems to be assumed knowledge) A2: I did end up ...


1

Unless the DSLR/Mirrorless camera you are using outputs 10-bit 4:2:2, using an external recorder to up-convert the footage to ProRes HQ will not result in a better image quality than what the camera is able to produce/output. If anything it will allow you to edit and re-compress the footage multiple times without losing the original quality. Using an ...


1

I managed to get an acceptable result by exporting as Mov/Prores 4444 and a Timeline Colorspace of Rec 709 Gamma 2.2.


1

In Media Encoder you first need to select your destination format as Quicktime. From there you should be able to find ProRes 4444.


1

First, understand that you are probably asking the wrong question. (I'll quickly answer it for you anyway -- the BMPCC's native 10-bit ProRes support is superior.) The real question is probably which camera will produce a better-looking result for you. Whose ProRes implmentation doesn't really matter, and it should not factor into this purchase decision. ...


1

I believe the problem lies in how FFMPEG does the RGB->YUV conversion by default. This option specifies the use of the bt709 color space for the conversion, instead of the default of bt601. This fixes it for me - though please let me know if I'm doing something bad here! -vf scale=out_color_matrix=bt709


1

For some reason I think this is avoided when using ffmpeg's concat PROTOCOL (ffmpeg -i "concat:...") rather than its concat DEMUXER (ffmpeg -f concat -i mylist.txt). Oddly, it's also slightly more convenient since using the demuxer requires me to create the text file with the file names in it while with the protocol I can just specify them on the command ...


1

Since Adobe CS5 XDCAM files are supported natively, make sure the folder structure is the same like on your SXS Card, open up the Sony Clip Browser and try to load up the files - this should work immediately. If you can't see the files, there must be an encoding error or the files are corrupt.


1

Only Prores 4444 supports alpha channels, see the manual: The Apple ProRes 4444 codec offers the utmost possible quality for 4:4:4 sources and for workflows involving alpha channels. It seems to work for me, using the Animation codec with "Millions of Colors+". I'm on a Mac using Adobe CC. Here are the steps I took: Export your AE comp using Quicktime ...


1

For such low quality footage (320 by 240 was quarter resolution even in the early 2000s), I'd probably go with DV format. It's a major video standard that, while not used much anymore (though HDV is still used), was a major video standard and thus isn't going anywhere quickly (just look at how MPEG-1 has hung around). It is designed for high quality video ...


1

According to Miraizon support this is a peculiarity in Premiere Pro handling of ProRes that causes it to interact "very inefficiently" with the the codec. There is an update forthcoming but until then they suggested this as a work-around: Move the AppleProResDecoder.qtx from the /Quicktime/QTSystem/ folder to a temp folder. I still get some inconsistencies ...


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