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17

Suspend A simple method is to suspend it with ctrl+z. Or you could get the PID with pgrep ffmpeg then use kill -s SIGSTOP <PID> to suspend. Then resume with fg command or kill -s SIGCONT <PID>. Unfortunately this will not survive a reboot. VM If you use a virtual machine, with something like VirtualBox, you could perform your encoding in a ...


13

On Windows, pressing the "Pause/Break" key (the top-right most key) will pause it. Enter will resume. If it doesn't work, click on the command prompt window to give it focus.


12

It didn't seem possible as of Sep 30 2015. I would suggest segmenting the source file, encoding the segments and then stitching the resultant files. This isn't a true pause/resume facility but the piecemeal division will allow you to have a break from encoding. A rough overview of the commands to issue: Break the fullfile into parts ffmpeg -i recording....


9

If you have ffprobe installed: ffprobe <input> -show_entries format=nb_streams -v 0 -of compact=p=0:nk=1 You can also filter for video or audio streams by adding -select_streams v or -select_streams a, respectively. See the manual for more details. If you do not have ffprobe, ffmpeg can be used too, but in a slightly less robust way (i.e., this may ...


7

FFMpeg has an option to modify the aspect ratio of a video file without actually modifying the video, see http://www.ffmpeg.org/ffmpeg-all.html#Video-Options For example, in your case, the desired aspect ratio is 720 / 480 = 1.5 (3:2) (which is NOT 4:3, it should be 540 in that case) So your command line may look like: ffmpeg -i input_file.avi -c copy -...


5

Suspending the Thread works on Windows too, not with ctrl + Z, but in the resource manager, you can also resume it there.


4

I sugest instead of pausing, you give the encoding process the very least system priority (aka "renice"), so you can work daily comfortably and the encoding will take place in background with the unused system ressources. So your encoding will take place seamlessy 24/7 without interruptions, without conflicting with day work as AFAIK OSX lacks the pidof ...


4

To expand upon ObscureRobot's answer, use ffmpeg like so: ffmpeg -loop 1 -f image2 -r 2 -i input1.png -i input2.aiff -c:v libx264 -c:a copy -shortest output.mp4 -loop 1 -f image2 -r 2 -i input1.png tells ffmpeg to loop input1.png forever, at a frame rate of 2fps. -c:v libx264 tells it to use x264 to encode the video, and -c:a copy tells it to simply copy ...


3

A lot of these answers seem somewhat misleading unfortunately. Forget about getting a capture card. Practically every one has AGC. AGC is very similar to macrovision, except it's superimposed onto any video source. It's impossible to disable unless you use Linux and know your way around hacking drivers. Some cards on Windows have third party tools to ...


3

AVIdemux can do that when encoding, but i cannot remember if it allows you to do that when you chose to copy the stream without reencoding (you don't want to reencode, since it will not only be time consuming, but also lossy). If you are willing to change it from AVI to MKV (VLC and most other players will have no problem playing it) you can do that with ...


2

I think ffmpeg is what you want, but you will need to dive into the docs to figure out how to make it do what you want.


2

I think ffmpeg is what you want, but you will need to dive into the docs to figure out how to make it do what you want.


2

There are a few problems here that need to be addressed. First, the pitch shot is vertically oriented or "portrait" (vs landscape). This is considered very, very bad practice. This is a huge and constant amateur mistake because many amateurs now shoot video with their tablets and smartphones and hold the device the way they normally do, vertically, but ...


2

Generally, I would expect that just about any solution will work pretty well now. The capabilities of even cheap modern hardware so far outpace the capability of laserdisc that you aren't likely to lose much. Certainly a professional quality capture system similar to the ones Matrox sells would do a superb job, but I'd hazard that even a cheap $30 USB to ...


2

Looks like you are ready to enter the world of Lift-Gamma-Gain! These are the three controls that most colorists use to tame light and the sensors that record it. AJ Henderson is putting you on the right path, with suggestions that there's more to image control than just gamma, levels, curves, etc., but really you will find a lot more resources by ...


2

You want to adjust a mix of gamma, brightness and contrast, or if available, simply use curves. Gamma impacts the way in which the output intensity corresponds to input intensity, but if you don't also adjust other settings, you will still end up clipping key details outside of either the signal range of your signal or the display range of your display. ...


2

FFMPEG of course. Being a command line application it can be easily integrate into any batch process no matter how convoluted, with the benefit that you get to learn about the power of the command line while you're at it (worked for me). I haven't explored h.265 encoding much yet, but using settings I stole from the ffmpeg wiki here's how you'd encode a ...


1

Video Caption Maker is free (with watermark). Otherwise you can hack together title screens and png's in iMovie which takes a bit of work.


1

You can choose "Kind" and set it to "Other" then type "Final Cut Pro Library" into the text field. Like this:


1

This is just an idea, but if you have some budget, it'd be a good idea to upgrade either the processor (to 8th gen Intel) or even better, the video card (to NVIDIA GTX 1050 or above) so you can encode h.265/HEVC with hardware acceleration instead of CPU-intensive x265. Your video encoding will be finished in much less than 20 hours, saving you electricity ...


1

(This for Linux) As you all probably know, pressing 'q' ends the recording file. ffplay has the 'p'-possibility. Why doesn't ffmpeg have the same thing? Maybe because it can lead to desync between video and audio?... I just ffmpeg-encode to x264-aac-mkv with crf (23) and always with the same video conditions, 'quit' (q) the recordings and join all the ...


1

Recording full screen, if your hardware allows you to do it smoothly, is your best option. You can always crop or mask out unwanted areas later in editing. You won't have that freedom if you crop the input at the time of recording. An exception to this rule of thumb can be made if you're absolutely sure that the area of interest is a portion of the screen at ...


1

Seems unlikely as per this section on the MythTV wiki: Pretty much the only Capture Cards that are supported on OS X are the HDHomerun tuners from Silicondust


1

Since you're a command-line user, you can use ffmpeg to do the conversion for you. I suspect when you mount your Sony camera, it probably always gets the same volume name. (Probably something like /Volumes/SONY/ or /Volumes/DSC/ or something like that.) You could write a script that basically walks through the directory containing the movies, and converts ...


1

This article looks like it'll get you close. Doesn't include the audio, but that honestly sounds easier than converting the images to video. Excerpt: ImageMagick and ffmpeg combined can be used to turn still images into video. Both ImageMagick and ffmpeg have been around for years, and are readily available as packages with most Linux distributions. ...


1

This article looks like it'll get you close. Doesn't include the audio, but that honestly sounds easier than converting the images to video. Excerpt: ImageMagick and ffmpeg combined can be used to turn still images into video. Both ImageMagick and ffmpeg have been around for years, and are readily available as packages with most Linux distributions. ...


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