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4

Certainly using RAW on ML will help. With 14 bit color, your noise reduction options are a lot more advanced. Traditional noise reduction that you are used to from photos can be used with video as well using either color grading software or editing software. (With RAW video, it would be in the color grading software before mixing down to processed clips.) ...


4

The noise in dim-lit environments is a result of how digital cameras work. The exposure of a picture or video depends on three essential parameters: lens aperture, shutter speed and ISO. The first two are about how much light falls on the camera sensor. The larger the aperture, the more light can enter the camera. The slower the shutter speed (i.e. the ...


3

When you have a camera with a small sensor, the little photosites can't read light very well. Photosites are like little pixels that are buckets of light that build up the image. When your sensor can't read light very well, it has to kind of guess what the light is and you just get random pixels firing off, creating that noisy pattern. And to get rid of ...


3

As you say, noise by definition doesn't compress well. You can try different types of noise in FCP. The Add Noise filter has several choices - Gaussian is a reasonable simulation of film grain, but you can try the other choices, too. They might compress better (or worse). But your best bet is to increase the data rate of the resulting file. I don't know ...


3

You can convert audio to keyframes. Right-click the footage with the audio, and choose Animation>Keyframe Assistant>Convert Audio to Keyframes, or with the audio layer selected go to the Animation menu in the menu bar. This will create a new layer with keyframes for the intensity of the audio. You can copy those keyframes on to any property that you want ...


2

It sounds like you need a shotgun mic Also known as a zoom mic. These microphones are designed to help isolate the sound you want originating from the subject while rejecting unwanted ambient noise. The pickup angle is slightly adjustable. To have a narrower cone, you need a longer mic. (see video below) Also to reduce wind noise pickup, you usually cover ...


2

Your most critical need is going to be a professional low noise analog to digital converter and pre-amp with a decent quality microphone to go with it. There are a few options you can pursue for this depending on your interests. Since you are currently working with a computer directly, you could go for any of a number of professional audio capture devices ...


2

Filming any light that is strongly a single color is likely to produce a lot of noise because it's absorbing more light. (In your case, the red brick is absorbing green and blue, leaving only the red.) Furthermore, if you're filming with a Bayered CMOS sensor like the ones found in most phone cameras and DSLRs, the sensor captures twice as much green light ...


1

Commands are instructions sent from an interface external to the filter, usually an external program using a ZMQ protocol. There is a filter that can execute commands which is what I'll use here. Base syntax is ffmpeg -i in -af "asendcmd=c='0.0 afftdn@n sn start; 1.0 afftdn@n sn stop',afftdn@n" noiseout.wav To use another source for noise profile, you'll ...


1

So, you'd be inverting the phase of the noise signal, adjusting its amplification to match the level of the noise in the other clip, and then summing the two to obtain speech minus noise. You might find that adding EQ. to the noise signal as well as amplification might also help. Any audio app that can mix two signals could do this, if you want a good free ...


1

Trapcode Particular is the tool of choice for this. You can generate any type of noise/particles, based on an audio track, and tie the parameters to not just the track, but specific frequencies (so the noise is warped on low bass, or changes color on high frequencies). There are also a lot of templates you can buy on videohive that will jumpstart the ...


1

My general rule is to do as little in the camera as possible (exposure, shutter). Leave everything else for post. It's not expected that the camera will have the best available NR or compression etc, and if you do it while recording you can't undo it later. Of course if you'll never do any post, do what gives you the best result.


1

Like it is said in a comment, use more light and dial the ISO down. This is how filmmaking has been done for years and years. My guess is on the MK3 5D if you are getting tons of noise, you are underexposing and maybe trying to correct it in post. The MK3 is rpetty good and doesn't generate a lot of noise. If you absolutely have to shoot at a higher ISO ...


1

Try seperating the audio and video streams of the WMV and AVI files - I don't have an app in mind but there should be some free ones avaliable. Put the video part in, which will remain in the original format (WMV or AVI) and should work. For the audio, use Soundbooth to convert it into a variety of formats like WAV, MP3, WMV, etc. until the import works ...


1

The answer is always "More light". The higher the illumination of the sensor (within obvious limits), the less noise or grain. If you must deal only with ambient light -- you can't supplement or fill in -- then open the iris. However, in doing so you trade off depth of field, so it's a balancing act. Generally, avoid increasing preamp 'gain' to compensate ...


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The first thing is to make sure any gain is off. Gain on a video camera is like high ISO on a digital still camera. It increases the noise floor significantly and causes much more noise in even a good image. This should make the camera make other adjustments to try to preserve the exposure with a lower noise floor. If there is still too much noise, it ...


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