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6

I can't record video using only the eyecup view D5200 is an SLR, that is a single-lens reflex camera. As opposed to mirrorless cameras, SLRs use a mirror which sends the image which passes through the lens to the top where, with the help of a pentaprism, the light is redirected to the viewfinder. When you shot a photo, the mirror is raised, letting the ...


5

There are three main reasons that still cameras with video functionality have restrictions on the length of video they will shoot. The first and most common, as tomh pointed out is tax purposes. The European Union charges a 5% tax on any video recording device and sets the limit at any device capable of recording 30 minutes or more of video. To avoid this ...


4

Ever see the credit for "focus puller" in a film's credits? That's a single person's job, just to keep the camera focus where it should be on a moving shot (or even for changing the focus point at the right time in an otherwise static shot). Usually the shot would be blocked out before hand, and they would work out exactly where the object of focus is going ...


4

You should consider other options than Nikon/Canon. Even if they have proven DSLR can do really good video, thanks to 5D Mark II/III and Magic Lantern, they do not compete well against Panasonic and Sony. If you compare 5D Mark III against a Sony A7S, you're going to have a much better video quality on A7S, thanks to its far superior sensor. Much higher ...


3

Nikon D3300 supports AF-S and AF-F modes for video recording. AF-F helps you to keep focus without touching the shutter release button. This page says that you never touch the shutter release button in AF-F mode. Just turn live view on, switch your focusing mode to AF-F, and wait until the camera focuses by itself (unlike what you do with a normal autofocus ...


3

No, the D750 is not a good alternative for an avid videographer, at least not if you want the advantages Magic Lantern offers. ML isn't available for Nikon. The reason has nothing to do with the technical advantages of either platform, you can get models of camera that are fairly close in that regard. The problem is that Nikon does not have anything ...


3

For me it looks like you use Auto whitebalance. Try to set the whitebalance to one particular value depend of the light you shoot.


3

Don't use auto white balance and use manual exposure. Auto white balance will guess at what is white and may shift while you are running video on some cameras (which makes sense since often people may move from one room to another while shooting or lighting conditions could change. Manual exposure will preserve luminosity. Auto exposure shouldn't change ...


3

Amazingly, the best place to start with a question like this is Youtube. Believe it or not they have help file that explain the process with quite a bit of detail: https://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1722171&topic=2888648&ctx=topic On Youtube itself many others have offered up video tutorials on how to do it: Youtube....


3

I have seen some trainwrecks by combining Nikon .mov with Vegas Pro 10. After tech calls into both Nikon and Sony it was determined that my machine didn't have enough resources. I need to upgrade from 32 bit to a 64 bit version of Win7, plus I need to go from a quad core to an i7, and from 4GB to 12 GB or better. I can use my Nikon files now but only if I ...


2

bmargulies, There are few questions here: Are you looking for a multicam setup? If so the two cameras are unlikely going to match unless you are willing to put in time to post production work. (fix it in post! http://d3j5vwomefv46c.cloudfront.net/photos/large/639498971.jpg?1345259967) What is the purpose of this video If its a 'creative' project (as in ...


2

The easiest way to set up a sequence with the right settings for your footage is to first import the video footage into your Premiere Pro project. Then right click on the clip in the media bin, and select "new sequence from clip." That will create a new sequence with settings that match your footage.


2

The best option is going to be a format which matches the resolution, pixel pitch, frame rate and color format/color space of your original footage. These settings can typically be changed based on the shooting mode you used on your camera, so there is not enough detail in your question to give a specific setting. If you actually open up the footage file, ...


2

I use Nikon SLRs among a suite of other video cameras for professional corporate videography. The latest full-frame Nikons have proven to be good solutions for a higher-end look. As with all SLRs, they are far from the convenience of a typical, all-in-one ENG type camera and as with all SLRs their video capture quality is lacking. My solution if the Nikon is ...


2

The camera is not the only issue here. If you have Nikon lenses you can get great footage with a D750. I am sending my Sony A7S back to BH because of horrible focus issues in low light. If a scene is not well lit there are issues no matter what camera is used. You need a good prime lens to shoot in low light, not high ISO.


1

Don't try to judge critical focus from the viewfinder on the back of the camera. They are usually far too low resolution to be able to tell if things are pin-sharp or not (even with a loupe device). You'll need an external monitor, the higher resolution the better. You can use focus assist if your camera has it, which adds a highlight colour to sharp edges. ...


1

You can just turn off the AUTO ISO feature and set the ISO manually. This way it won't change throughout your recording, and this will also produce more consistent lighting, unless the lighting conditions change (i.e. your scene involves turning the lights on/off, opening/closing a window or something like that). Instructions on how to do that can be found ...


1

My guess is that it's simply because the photo was shot in a much higher resolution than the video. Even though they were downscaled to the same resolution, a (previously) higher-resolution image will look better in this situation in the same way that a clip shot in 4K will look better on a 1080p monitor than a clip shot in 1080p on the same monitor.


1

Sadly this isn't how it works. It could work with 25FPS and 1/200 if the shutter is precisly on the light impulse. Also keep in mind that even if the electricity is 50Hz, the light could have a refresh of 100Hz. Or you were just lucky that the shutter allways was on the light impulse. Solution: Well, sadly you don't really have a direcr solution for this ...


1

You can extract all the available metadata using a free Exif Tool which you can read about here. You need to bear in mind that you're less likely to extract as much Exif data from video as you are with photo. This is due to things like ISO, shutter and aperture changing all the time during the recording of video, and therefore is not logged to a specific ...


1

Shooting through a windshield is a very dicey proposition. There is an amazing amount of glare that you don't see when you are in the car, but which you will see when you look at your camera footage. A far better solution would be to mount a GoPro (or some other small, disposable camera) on the exterior. Nevertheless, if you insist on using a DSLR, then ...


1

A mini-HDMI to HDMI adapter will not impact the presence of HDCP on the signal, it merely changes the connector passively. As to whether your Nikon uses HDCP or not, I'm unsure. My Canon 5D Mark iii also uses a mini-HDMI output and the first couple cables and adapters I got didn't connect very reliably, so I had signal issues until I found a cable that ...


1

Since your camera supports NTSC and PAL video over HDMI, recording video from a mac won't be much of a problem. You'll just need a small conversion box to get the video in. For our macs with thunderbolt, we use an Ultra Studio Mini Recorder. If you don't have thunderbolt, Grass Valley has a product that works over firewire. Once the feed's connected, you ...


1

Yes and no. Any camera with a sensor larger than 8mp (and the correct aspect ratio) is capable of recording 4k video frames. Firmware can grab frames off the sensor as fast as the sensor can read out. The ability to record video at a given frame rate is a limitation of the sensor's ability to read fast enough, the processor's ability to encode fast enough ...


1

I use my Nikon DSLR to record videos, so I'll share some pointers with you. DSLR are capable of producing very good video images. This is thanks to their sensor size and optics, compared to many handycams. However, since their primary use is not video, there are some things to keep in mind: I don't recommend using autofocus. It is slow (Nikon in Live ...


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