4

Yes, they are used for adding visual effects in post. The mirrored ball is for creating an environment map or reflection map. These maps provide the same lighting from the real scene to the virtual scene where graphics are created to composite into the existing scene. I believe the grey ball is used for recording more diffuse lighting from all angles, ...


2

This feature is called "motion detection" in the video surveillance jargon and can be found on most IP cameras and NVRs. There is a large variety of solutions out there depending on the level of accuracy that you need, the ability to divide the monitored perimeter into zones, whether the analytics run off a live or recorded feed, the OS that you use, and ...


2

I was recently editing a 5-camera short film with Premiere. Over 7 hrs worth of footage. Lots of going back and forth over the clips. Lots of trying different angles. All that over many weeks. Yet, we never got lost or confused about what was happening or where things were. Create your multi-cam sequence. Log all camera angles individually by using a lot of ...


2

Export to 30p. 29.97 to be exact if there is the option. Exporting at 60fps is only going to bloat the file size (twice as many frames) per second-- if it's 60p and not 60i of data to encode. Secondly, viewers are akin to watching media playback in or around the 24-30fps range. It's what our eyes are used to, so your viewers wont be distracted as to why ...


2

You didn't mention which version of PPro you are using; but in version CS6 and prior there IS a bug with cross dissolve which is a bit idiosyncratic. The fix; move all of your video (select all) up one layer. Then add black video; or a color matte (black) which is the length of your program to the bottom (first) video track. This in essence resets all ...


2

When you create a Multi-Cam sequence, the prompt will give you the option to name the cameras based on the track or clip name. I don't believe there is a way to rename the cameras after setting up Multi-Cam. One other option would be to put each clip into a sequence with a text layer as an overlay. After you have finished arranging your Multi-Cam ...


2

One (probably dumb) way to do this is: Select all 11 clips again and create a new, temporary Multicam clip. Double-click the temporary multicam clip and find out the exact timecode where the new, 11th clip was added. Copy the 11th clip. Delete the newly created temporary multicam clip Double-click the original multicam clip Navigate to that exact same ...


2

The only thing you can do to mitigate your pain in post is to white balance all of them on the day of the shoot in the conditions of the shoot (shoot lighting, etc), probably right before the shoot. And then get to work in post. Don't hope for a miracle though. No one would use that many cameras and hope for the colors to match. You're only going to be ...


2

Shows can be either "Single camera" or "Multi camera." Sitcoms, shows broadcast live, and stuff shot in front of a live audience is generally multicam -- they do it once, or as few times as needed to get a good take. They just have three (or however many) cameras, and cut between them. Other stuff is Single camera. Some "Single camera" stuff actually has ...


2

Never mind, I figured it out. Look at the timeline in the picture in my original question. Next to the multi-camera track, the "V1" is not selected. I selected that, and the multi-camera view came back. (I thought the "V1" just indicated which track a clip would be pasted to! Guess not.)


1

I think that the best way to go is to use a mixer like the BlackMagic ATEM-series. I am working in a film-studio and have worked mainly with the ATEM Television Studio HD Mixer, which has all the capabilities you would want. Mixers like these have SDI/BNC and HDMI inputs and are capable of mixing and converting each signal, using lower-thirds, live-keying (...


1

I think the answer depends upon what frame rate you want to deliver your video at. In general it is better to shoot at the delivery frame rate. I agree they probably won't go far out of sync if the clips are only short (a minute or so). If you do need to adjust them, I would frame rate adjust whichever clip is going to be on screen for less time in the ...


1

What you need to do is mark the edit points for the clip where you want the effect to appear. Then highlight the edited clip so that it is highlighted in yellow. Now copy that clip by pressing Command+C. Now menu over the clip and select “Lift from storyline”. You will now have an empty grey clip on the Storyline. Click on that Grey clip and paste the ...


1

Ryan, sorry, but I think it's basically too late. You can certainly turn on multicam editing mode now but Premiere is not going to recognize your existing edits. If you have more footage to edit you could use multicam mode for the remaining portion.


1

I record conferences all the time, so I end up getting 10's of hours of footage at a time. I have a few tricks that help with syncing: Run all cams all the time. If a full day shoot gets only 3 files per cam, that's a lot less work to sync than 25 files from each cam. Stop and start all cams within the same few seconds. Learn to notice key waveforms. ...


1

Try and make sure Angles is checked: This solution worked for me and I found it here towards the bottom of the post: https://larryjordan.com/articles/apple-final-cut-pro-x-multicam-naming-weirdness/


1

Premiere Pro is definitely not a digital audio workstation. Its treatment of audio is primitive at best. I believe its paradigm (which I think is screwy, but that's my opinion) is that a multicam clip conveys one of two types of audio: the preview channel track (which you have selected as Channel 1) or audio-follows-video, which means each cut you make, ...


1

I'm a little confused. Perhaps it's the terminology you're using. Are you really talking about cropping (throwing away the top, bottom, and sides of the image), or do you mean scaling? Are you creating three angles from the same camera (which explains why you'd crop, but I can't imagine happening in an interview scenario), or do you have one BMPC and two ...


1

Here's what I do, however I will admit Premiere's buggyness seems to flare up with this workaround. Sync the cameras into a multicam seq Open the multicam seq Nest each camera angle (track) into its own seq Open each camera angle seq and ad an adjustment layer to correct all clips to match other camera angles Open the multicam seq in the source monitor Set ...


1

You can't select, say, two video tracks from your Multi-cam sequence and show them at the same time. You're going to have to go at it separately. A Multi-Cam sequence is really for going back and forth between angles, not to show two or more angles at the same time. A solution: - On Video track 1, put your base image or shot. - One Video track 2, put the ...


1

Use In/Out points. Put an "In" point on the audio clip, and one on each of the already-synced video clips. Those "In" points should be put on the same sync points (that is, moments that are clearly visible on all clips, say, the clap-board clapping and the sound of the clap!). Whatever sync-point you choose, make sure it's also visible on your non-synced ...


1

I assume you have multiple inputs and want some kind of automatic editing that will switch which feed is live based on what has activity at the time. Unfortunately, pure changes in pixel values aren't really a super ideal way to tell what is interesting. There are systems which handle automatic selection of the speaker such as Microsoft's RoundTable system ...


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