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3

Finally figured it out (with some help). You can drag a whole side at a time! Here's how: Click one of the 2 corners to (subtly) select it. Shift-click-and-drag the other corner. That will select the whole side between the two corners. It will also limit your "dragging path" to paths that are at 45 degrees or 90 degrees relative to the corner's original ...


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In After Effects CC, masks can be made into tracking masks. Right click the mask and you should see a context menu with Tracking Mask. Select it and the mask can be tracked to the video it is applied to. The Adobe page about it is here. This will track the video but the mask will be a rigid shape. If you want the points inside the mask to track individual ...


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According to the comments on that page, it is rotoscoped - which is (from Wikipedia) the technique of manually creating a matte for an element on a live-action plate so it may be composited over another background.


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Normally effects are applied before masks, but some aren't. For these effects it means that you need to precompose the layer with the effect applied, and then apply the mask to the precomp. I don't know why, it's pretty certainly a bug, but Colorama is one of those effects. Turn off Colorama and your masks should start behaving normally. So what you need ...


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You need to use keyframes instead of tracking. You can find them here: For better understanding of how they work, read about them, or watch the video. Long story short, you need to create keyframe in the first place, where motion starts. After that you need to have keyframe in every place, where is key place of position. If you will just move the mask, ...


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Yeah, that's a weird thing with the radio waves effect. It seems to be applied after the layer masks, and thus ignores the masks for the layer. This happens for a few effects, particularly ones that generate alpha. It might have something to do with that effect dating back at least to the Bronze Age—you'll have noticed how dog slow it is. The only way to ...


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What you are thinking about is a very great way to save production costs and is used in many cases on many sets. Here is what your pipeline would look like: Shoot the footage with green tables Track the movement of the camera (using pfTrack preferably, but after effects can do the trick too) Importing the tracked movement into any 3D-software such as ...


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One of the biggest ironies of working with visual effects is that if you've done your work well, the audience won't notice the work you've done. Good effects appear effortless; the better the effect, the more effort concealment required. So when you ask, "Is there a better way?" the bad news is: Not if you're looking for an easier way. The good ...


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Found a solution. Maybe someone will need it. Layer -> Auto-Trace


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In Premiere To avoid the trip to AE you can do it in Premiere, but it does increase the complexity of your timeline. You use the Track Matte Key effect, plus a colour key effect. It's a little tricky, but here's the basic set-up: start with your three layers. On the bottom, the background that the dancing man is going to be in front of. Could be empty if ...


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Method 1 In your timeline, stack the matte clip on top of the character clip and add the Ultra Key effect to the matte with the red color as the key. Nest those two clips, and place another Ultra Key effect on the nest, this time keying the black. You'll probably have to mess with the ultra key settings a bit (transparency, choke, and soften) for both ...


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The answer to your question is yes. Masks, solids or multi-compositions will help. What, you want more? Oh ok. Thing about After Effects is that there is almost always at least two valid ways of doing anything: To fix your problem you could use masks on each eye. Now because you're scaling the layers, and masks are attached to a layer and scale with it, ...


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It's tricky but it looks like it was shot in a Studio (Green Screen) and that they had a bit of red straw and tiny piles of red sand on the floor. That's why most of it looks like one Shot, because it is - they neither sang and danced then teleported nor did they dance twice and get that many people in perfect sync and switch from one to the other - they ...


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After Effects and masking are both total overkill for this problem. First you want a video editor, not a complex VFX system, as your baseline. If you have After Effects, you likely also have Premiere Pro. Drag and drop each video onto a separate video layer. In Premiere Pro, each video layer has an Effects tab that includes a Motion effect. The Motion ...


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You need to rotoscope every object in front of your "background". There is not simple solution, because AE cant tell the difference between you foreground and background. Even I can't tell, because people drop shadows on your "background", etc. You can try to use rotobrush for that, but if you have there a lot of people, it will require a lot of work.


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There is an effect called Corner Pin that does exactly this. Apply it to the video and drag the corners so that the video is the shape you want. You may need to mask the layer as well - it's usually easiest to precompose the layer with the effect on it as the effect is applied after masking, making it a bit tricky to position your mask. For more bells and ...


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Add a new custom generator and set the colour to white. Add your media above. In this example, I will use a photo. Apply the Draw Mask to your image. Click to add 4 control points, then set the control point positions using the inspector. Choose B-Spline as the Shape Type, then set the Feather and Falloff as appropriate.


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I take it you are looking for Motion Tracking. Unfortunately, Premiere Pro doesn't have that capability. You'd have to set keyframes for the animation manually, which can be a pain if it needs to be accurate. If you need to do automated Motion Tracking, you could switch to After Effects which comes with that capability (see link above).


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Set the RAM preview resolution to full.


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If the camera's static, then it's totally doable. Start by making a clean plate image of the whole area, as I think you have done. Put that on a layer above (on top of) your original footage. Whenever the problem people wander in to shot, cover them up by putting a masked area of your clean plate over them. As you mentioned, sometimes this means the ...


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