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3

Assuming your input is full range RGB when fed to the filter, then something like geq=r='if(between(st(1,r(X,Y)+g(X,Y)+b(X,Y)),15,750),p(X,Y),if(lt(ld(1),15),C1R,C2R))': g='if(between(st(1,r(X,Y)+g(X,Y)+b(X,Y)),15,750),p(X,Y),if(lt(ld(1),15),C1G,C2G))': b='if(between(st(1,r(X,Y)+g(X,Y)+b(X,Y)),15,750),p(X,Y),if(lt(ld(1),15),C1B,C2B))' Here the two ...


2

The LUT filters don't have cross-referencing of channels. Use geq instead geq=r='if(gt(g(X,Y),145),255,p(X,Y))':g='if(gt(g(X,Y),145),255,p(X,Y))':b='if(gt(g(X,Y),145),255,p(X,Y))'


1

One method would be MatchGrade in Nuke (available only in NukeX and Nuke Studio). It can calculate LUT/CDL from two inputs. https://learn.foundry.com/nuke/content/reference_guide/color_nodes/matchgrade.html Blackmagic Resolve has feature for automatic shot matching, but I don't know if you can export LUT from that.


1

In addition to what @Geordie said, keep in mind that LUT files can contain floating point values which means that they can describe values that would be between the 8-bit values in a PNG file. Additionally, they can describe values above 1 or below 0 for HDR workflows.


1

They're essentially the same thing with different storage layouts. A 2D LUT is just slices of a 3D LUT laid out in an image. People use formats like Cube becasue that's what the software supports. Because formats like Cube were invented before hardware acceleration it was probably just easier to load data already stored as 3D because the color transform ...


1

Be sure media encoder has the same LUTs in same order - otherwise it will take a different lut... its a better way to browse to your lut in premiere - Media Encoder will use the same path and therefore doesn't screw up the correct lut. Took a while for me to find out!


1

I agree with McFlySoHigh. If you have multiple adjustment layers placed one above the other, the effects will be applied from Top to Bottom. A bit more on the order of effects application in Premiere Pro: First, it applies effects from Master Clip, Then go the effects applied to the clip in a regular way: to the Effect Controls panel (Top to Bottom) Then, ...


1

I'm fairly certain that Premiere Pro renders all layers from bottom to top. I have found several sources that confirm this behaviour for After Effects, but nowhere is it stated explicitly for Premiere Pro. From the Adobe documentation for After Effects: A composition consists of layers stacked on top of one another in the Timeline panel. When the ...


1

I'm a little confused. Perhaps it's the terminology you're using. Are you really talking about cropping (throwing away the top, bottom, and sides of the image), or do you mean scaling? Are you creating three angles from the same camera (which explains why you'd crop, but I can't imagine happening in an interview scenario), or do you have one BMPC and two ...


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