4

OK, answering my own question. Sony recently announced a 4K CMOS sensor with an electronic global shutter, see this blog post and the references inside. So, the status seems to be: reaching the higher end of the market right now (Nov. 2012), the technology does exist. We still have to wait a few years before seeing these global shutters in lower tiers ...


3

"The ugly CMOS replaced CCD" because of cost, complexity, power consumption, pixel density, light sensitivity, etc. In every regard — except of the rolling shutter artefacts, of course — CMOS sensors are better. They also do not exhibit the saturation trail effect, the vertical "ray of light" that occurs when pointing a CCD camera towards very bright light ...


3

When you take a photo with a Modern camera "usually" it's 4/3, I know you can change the aspect ratio, but that's not my point. I assume, that the sensors of DSLR cameras are the same ratio, because they are created for the purpose of creating photos, aren't they? Actually, no. Only low-end digital cameras (mostly point-and-shoot) use a 4/3 aspect ratio, ...


2

Focus is focus is focus, whether for still or video. But the story does not end there. Focal length, aperture, sensor size, circle of confusion, etc., all play a role in determining whether you perceive something to be in focus or not. Here's a link to the math. The long and short of it is that quite often a camera that shoots both stills and video will ...


2

To replace a white background with an image, you need to use a Luma Key. A Luma Key is like a Chroma Key, except that instead of using a color value (such as green or blue, usually qualified also by a certain level of luma), you will use only a luma value (such as anything brighter than 200 IRE). Most NLE software have both compositing and keying ...


2

Shutter speed and motion blur are inversely proportional. The higher the shutter speed, the less amount of motion blur, so crank up the shutter speed as high as it will go. If the exposure comes out too dark, add more lights. Keep in mind that high shutter speeds in combination with fluorescent or HMI light can produce scrolling banding due to the power ...


1

The main reason is that while CMOS has made great strides in overcoming it's limitations, there are still some advantages that CCDs hold. I wasn't able to find anything completely up to date, but this article from 2017 has a few examples. There's more ability to get consistent results from each pixel and get higher quality analog to digital conversion with ...


1

Many types of artificial lighting flicker at twice the rate of the power source. This is most pronounced with fluorescent lighting, but also happens to a lesser extent with incandescent. Common power sources are 50 Hz (in Europe and most of Asia) and 60 Hz (in North America), which cause 100 and 120 pulses of light each second, respectively. Other than ...


1

Actually, 2/3" sensors have been, and still are used for television all over the world. Even now that recently there has been an increase in larger sensor camera's being used for TV production, by far most factual tv shows are produces with 2/3" camera's. What "quality" is acceptable for broadcast is highly dependant on what country you live in. Alltough ...


1

Small sensor means two things: increased depth of field (everything is in focus, no soft backgrounds) and more noise in low-light conditions. If either of these are a deal-breaker then consider changing. Here's why maybe you shouldn't: To get a large sensor camera with the ease of use and ergonomics of this camera you'll be looking at cameras like the Sony ...


1

The answer is always "More light". The higher the illumination of the sensor (within obvious limits), the less noise or grain. If you must deal only with ambient light -- you can't supplement or fill in -- then open the iris. However, in doing so you trade off depth of field, so it's a balancing act. Generally, avoid increasing preamp 'gain' to compensate ...


1

The first thing is to make sure any gain is off. Gain on a video camera is like high ISO on a digital still camera. It increases the noise floor significantly and causes much more noise in even a good image. This should make the camera make other adjustments to try to preserve the exposure with a lower noise floor. If there is still too much noise, it ...


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