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TV technology and video encoding is in principle outside the scope of this site. Still, as photographers we are presumably interested in new display standards that promise both more dynamic range and wider color gamut. HDR computer monitors are coming, so it probably won't be long before photographers too will be interested in HDR displays. HDR by itself ...


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Dynamic range is the difference between extreme light and extreme dark, whereas bit depth defines the number of steps in between. There is a practical relationship between the two, not a theoretical: When you do some color grading on these videos (and with high dynamic range videos you will probably do some extreme grades), then you will easily introduce ...


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More bits mean more possible values for each channel. So each channel in an 8 bit image has 256 possible values, from 0 to 255, while a 10 bit channel has 4 times as many: 0 to 1024. Dynamic range however is the range between the brightest sample a sensor chip can encode and the darkest - it is a property of the sensor. So you could conceivably have an 8 ...


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At a guess, it will be a similar technology to HDRx from RED or Magic Lantern - 2 frames instead of one recorded for every single video frame. Reference 1: http://www.red.com/learn/red-101/hdrx-high-dynamic-range-video Reference 2: http://cgi.tutsplus.com/tutorials/a-simple-way-to-shoot-hdr-video-footage-using-magic-lantern--ae-20993 In Magic Lantern every ...


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You cannot magically pull out more resolution than the material you have. If it's 1920x1080, the resolution can only get smaller, i.e. 1280x720. There are options like Nvidia's Ai-Upscaling, but it works rather bad when applied to faces, which you'll probably run into. Another method might be to use Red Giant's Upscalers. They use more advanced upscaling ...


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I'd suspect anything purely automated is going to be pretty marginal. There's a lot of complexity to getting a good curve with the right gamma, but there's a variety of possible levels of what would be considered "good results". Personally, I'd rather try getting a good mapping manually with something like Resolve and then trying to see what scenes I could ...


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The ProRes input will have YUV encoding, not RGB. If you need a raw dump, save as rawvideo. ffmpeg -i in.mov -f rawvideo raw.yuv Note that bit depths which aren't multiples of 8 are still stored in data layouts which are, with padding. So, if ProRes is yuv422p10le in limited / studio range, the 10-bit luma value for a white pixel will be 940 or 1110101100 ...


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Assuming your file is ${F}, the below is an efficient means I have been able to create: COLORS=$(ffprobe -show_streams -v error "${F}" |egrep "^color_transfer|^color_space=|^color_primaries=" |head -3) for C in $COLORS; do if [[ "$C" = "color_space="* ]]; then COLORSPACE=${C##*=} elif [[ "$C" = "color_transfer="* ]]; then ...


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I've found how to get this information from color primaries attribute. Considering color primaries BT.2020 as a HDR video. mediainfo video.mp4 --Inform="Video;%colour_primaries%" In this example above, if the return of the command is BT.2020 so I consider the video as HDR. Otherwise SDR.


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HDR in the modern TV sense refers to one of several different HDR specifications for color. To understand what High Dynamic Range means, we first need to understand what dynamic range is. Dynamic Range is the difference between the highest and lowest values in a signal or display. A high dynamic range TV generally means that there is a large amount of ...


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HDR doesn't relate to color space at all, as it stands for "High Dynamic Range", ie. brightness, not color, contrast. Traditional TV signals had a rather low contrast ratio, as old TV sets had a contrast of only 30:1. Modern displays can produce a lot more, 1000:1 or more with dynamic backlight (local dimming). "HDR" displays are just a marketing term for ...


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