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23

The default settings for ffmpeg are very low quality, and since you don't specify any codec or quality parameters it's just using the defaults (I don't know why the devs don't fix that because it generates a lot of questions on forums everywhere). Edit: the defaults are now quite sane. With a recent build of ffmpeg you don't need to specify anything more ...


11

The problem is that definitions such as HD, UHD and 4k etc. are partly hype. Marketers for AV equipment like to be rather elastic with the truth, hence the rather rubbery definitions. They're not standards such as ATSC or DVB, or graphic display resolutions such as VGA, WXGA etc., they're really just buzzwords. There are other complications - like the ...


8

No, there is no difference to the human eye (or exceptionally minimal). Your monitor can't display higher quality than it is capable of displaying. The only advantage you would have is if you were to zoom in on part of the image, you would have more detail when you zoomed in. The exception to this is if the 4k stream uses enough extra bandwidth to reduce ...


7

What you are talking about is upscaling and any current HDTV will do upscaling automatically. Upscaling doesn't work miracles though, it will only make it so that the lower quality signal can be watched on a higher quality display. It just multiplies the pixels so that a 720 by 480 (.9 pixel compressed) signal for example doesn't end up only taking up 1/4 ...


5

There's not a lot of point to it. You're using more network bandwidth to download it, and your computer is working harder to display it, but no, you get no additional visible quality from it. In fact, it's likely that you'll get lower quality because the computer has to downsample it before it can display it.


4

It uses a lower data rate (within the TV, not for the actual signal) and is cheaper to produce. That is all. The only difference is that if you are going to view it on a 1080i display, then shooting in 1080i would look slightly smoother since half the information updates every half a frame rather than updating the whole thing at once, but 1080p is ...


4

The cabling is likely your problem. The composite cables you're using (red, yellow, white) will only move analog signal from the set top box to the TV. Likewise with RG59 or RG6 (coaxial). While both varieties of cables there are technically capable of passing digital signals (they don't care... they're just dumb cables), set top boxes typically only ...


4

DVD Video is limited to Standard Def, not High Def (HD). Blu-Ray overcomes that limitation. Alternatively you can use the DVD as a filesystem and play arbitrary media using a computer. But as a media container itself, the DVDs limits are very restricted.


3

Apparently Youtube took some extra time to process the HD. Both are showing in HD now.


3

There is no one right answer to this very general question, but here are the considerations. Some cameras (such as the Canon EOS DSLRs) have very naive line-skipping algorithms to decimate their normally very high resolution down to FullHD or HD video. Such algorithms create lots of aliasing noise, which is further aggravated by further image scaling. ...


3

I assume the actual data rate is 3.3 Mb/s, not MB/s (bits, not bytes). This is very low for 1080p60, and artifacts are likely at such a low rate. You might consider capturing at at least double that rate. Alternatively (or also), halving the frame rate to 29.97 would double the effective bit rate. You would be trading some motion artifacting for less ...


3

Unacceptable is in the eye of the watcher, so that part is tough to answer. Distinguishable is easier: yes, there will be a difference. It will not be obvious in every frame or circumstance, but it will be there. If you simply truncate the lowest bit, it will raise the noise floor and the effect will be most evident in low light areas. So, it will look ...


3

Use Mpeg Streamclip, its an industry used conversion software that is reliable and fast, and free


2

A common problem for a slow edit is incorrectly setting the codec of the sequences. Unless under very specific circumstances (of which I'm not sure of), you should set your sequence codec (when you create the new sequence and Premiere asks you what preset it should use) to be identical to your footage.


2

FFmpeg can do this. By "FLV (Flashvideo)" I assume you mean "FLV1 / Sorenson Spark / Sorenson H.263". Not sure why anyone would choose this these days over H.264. Example: ffmpeg -i input -c:v flv1 -q:v 2 -filter:v scale=iw/2:-1,hqdn3d output.flv What the options mean: -c:v flv1 Choose the encoder named flv1 -q:v 3 Quality level. Range is 1-31 (for MPEG-...


2

I have no practical experience, but you might take a look at using a (linux) computer with blackmagic decklink or intensity pro card. There are command line tools like bmdtools which (should) allow you to interface the capture card. https://github.com/lu-zero/bmdtools You could then pipe the video input to ffmpeg to record. I don't know of a setting to ...


2

There is no way around needing more data rate to capture that much video information. It sounds like the camera probably isn't actually capable of delivering 1080P/60 but that they use a very low quality version so they can slap the label on the box. Data rates are generally measured in Mb(bits)/sec rather than MB/s, but even if your suggested rate ...


2

Native resolution is always better than non-native. If it only has a resolution of 720p, then it would have to be down-converting to that resolution which means it has to blend pixels which can produce artifacts from the pixel blending. (Notably, softer edges is the most likely.) Update: I'm sorry, re-reading, I noticed that it isn't native for either ...


2

They both matter. What really matters is the combination of the two. Scaling always produces a loss of quality unless you are using an even multiple of the resolution. This is because interpolation must occur during a scaling operation that isn't an even multiple or divisor of the original resolution. This is due to the fact that some pixels must ...


2

You're not going to be able to replicate the precise "look" of 59.94, even with special plugins. This, due to the fact that interlaced is in many ways like: Double Frame Rate - Half Resolution. Think of 59.94i at 1080 really as 119.88 at 540p. Interlaced lines are scanned odd lines first, then even. So you technically have a first set of lines which are ...


2

4:2:0 means that only the colour information is subsampled. So while that the colour is at a lower resolution the brightness information is at full resolution. This works because human vision is more sensitive to brightness than colour. A 4K 4:2:0 image has 3840×2160 luma samples (luma ≈ brightness) and 1920×1080 chroma samples (chroma ≈ colour). So it's ...


1

Upsample by an integer ratio can be completely blameless, just repeating pixels and lines gets it done, no new information, and you get only the original resolution displayed, but no losses either. This zero order hold based approach tends however not to be popular, and the amount of processing to do anything else rises rapidly especially if you either ...


1

Unfortunately, smart TVs are still a relatively young market and the ability to play back video files is not yet uniform. Each TV may support or not support a variety of formats, resolutions and frame rates. Your best bet is likely to stick to formats used by popular services such as youtube and NetFlix as these platforms increase the likelihood that a ...


1

Others have said the answer is simply no, but that's not entirely true. You can get some slight improvement from downscaling; errors and artifacts in the stream will be less visible, but this slight improvement usually isn't worth the increased bandwidth usage and CPU usage. Effective downscaling also requires graphics which can manage it, Nvidia GTX GPUs ...


1

If you're only delivering to the HTC One mini, then yes, screen resolution overrides source resolution, as you put it. Your assumptions are correct about 1080p video either having to be scaled or cropped to fit the display, and you're right, whether the source media is scaled or cropped does depend on the playback application. As a general rule, you ...


1

It is unlikely to be noticeable. This is basically the principal on which steganography operates. It changes the least significant bits in images and video such that there is not a noticeable change in the final image, however software can later pull out the data without it being obvious that the data was there. Without access to the original image it is ...


1

If Adobe Premiere has too steep a learning curve, you might like Adobe Premiere Elements. It is a pared down editing package and not as complex as Adobe Premiere. You can download a free trial here. See here for the system requirements. It is available for Windows 7 All non-linear editing programs are pretty much the same: they are I/O (input/output) ...


1

I can't really compare with other software, but I really like HitFilm Express 4. I've done everything you said in it. This basic version is free, has some excellent tutorials. It isn't a dumbed down NLE software. I enjoyed the free online course Visual Effects for Guerrilla Filmmakers that uses it as a tool. It is really fun to make some special effects ...


1

Free = BlackMagic Davinci Resolve 12.5 (Win, Mac, Linux) It is a fully fledged NLE and Colour correction and if you want to jump into the realms of SFX they offer Fusion for free as well (bear in mind that some options are limited but nothing for the basic and intermediate users) Paid - Adobe Premier Pro (Win, Mac), Apple FCPX (only Mac), Sony Vegas (Win)(...


1

I started to use Sony Movie Studio and have found it easy to get to grips with after watching an excellent set of tutorial videos titled "Video Editing Basics for Vloggers" by CalmBiker on YouTube. It is more capable than Movie Maker and definitely includes all the features you have asked for. The tutorials include details of how to perform pan & zoom, ...


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