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5

Here's what I would do... Create a camera Create a null object Set the parent of the null object to be the camera Make the null object a '3D' object Use the null object's properties to zoom and move the camera around, e.g. use the 'z' position to zoom You could do this with the camera by itself, but the null object is sometimes easier to deal with. Ease in ...


5

Good quality film cameras have a reflex viewfinder system, where "reflex" means that you're viewing through the lens, and thus you can judge focus by eye. To achieve this There are, er were, two basic strategies: Split the beam of light from the lens with a prism or half silvered mirror, meaning that most of the light goes to the film, and a bit ...


5

Well there's a number of factors that come into play, but first and foremost, the reason a camera operator pulls focus (if shooting alone) or having a 1st AC/2nd AC pull focus is because if you care about what you're shooting, you want focus to be tack sharp. Focus pulling is required on today's full frame and large sensor cameras because the Hyperfocal is ...


4

@Martin A provided an very in-depth answer, but I feel that it's worth noting one more thing: focus is part of the creative toolbox that filmakers use. Pulling focus from one actor to another in a 2 shot can be used to emphasise a reaction, or it can be used to reveal foreground or backgrounds, or pick out a subject from a crowd. Autofocus is not always able ...


4

Ever see the credit for "focus puller" in a film's credits? That's a single person's job, just to keep the camera focus where it should be on a moving shot (or even for changing the focus point at the right time in an otherwise static shot). Usually the shot would be blocked out before hand, and they would work out exactly where the object of focus is going ...


3

I'm not able to state a conclusive definition for "visual grammar", but I'd say camera settings have a quite relevant role on building it. Depth of field (aperture) is crucial for focusing on a subject; ISO may be used for obtaining a noisy image which can be used to say something (to look like an amateur, or a security camera, for instance); WB ...


3

Put a dummy object where you will sit, and focus on that. With a dedicated video camera, you would normally zoom in on the focus point, set the focus, and then zoom out again for your desired framing. Your camera appears to be a stills camera, and my understanding is that the lenses on a stills camera don't work the same way as the zoom lens on a video ...


3

There are two main ways this was solved: 1. Measuring Focus When using this method, the focus puller measures the distances at every point during the shot, and then pulls focus to these marks, at times making adjustments when an actor or grip misses their mark. This still occurs today, however is becoming less prevalent due to the filmmaking styles being ...


3

Other than what you mentioned, the only other alternative is to use a third party firmware that highlights the points of highest contrast. This gives you a better idea of what is focused on by highlighting the edges that are sharp in the LCD. MagicLantern offers this for most Canon cameras. I don't know if third party firmware for other DSLR makes has ...


3

You can simply scale the layer (or a null object) to get something like: Click on the stop watch of the position and scale properties of the layer at the first frame (to enable the properties: select the layer, hit S followed by Shift+P) Move 10-20 frames ahead Scale your layer Edit the position property or simply dragging the layer in the viewer to set the ...


3

There are three answers to this question. Number 1: use a much, much smaller sensor size. Every factor of two smaller means you can use half the focal length and enjoy an effective 2 f-stops of depth of field at the same aperture value. Thus 35mm to m43 means you can use a 25mm f2 lens and get the same depth of field as a 50mm f4 lens. A 2/3" video ...


2

I could be wrong, but my understanding of the AmazonBasics Wireless Remote Control is that it is only for remotely controlling the shutter (i.e., it only works for pictures). In photo mode, it will autofocus after you press the button. One thing to test would be to try enabling autofocus on your camera/lens, starting recording, and stand in front of the ...


2

To answer your second question: You can only use the zoom in, focus, zoom out if the lens is parfocal. Normally a parfocal zoom lens starts at 3000-4000 USD, thus I highly doubt the lens in this camera is parfocal. Then again, how much of an issue this will be depends entirely on the lens, perhaps it won't loose a lot of focus or it will loose a lot of ...


2

Probably the best thing you can do is get an external monitor. the electronic viewfinders on most DSLRs are too low resolution to be able to judge focus critically. Many of these monitors have built in edge peaking, or focus detection tools as well to make it even easier. Unfortunately to get a decent high resolution external monitor is going to cost the ...


1

Don't try to judge critical focus from the viewfinder on the back of the camera. They are usually far too low resolution to be able to tell if things are pin-sharp or not (even with a loupe device). You'll need an external monitor, the higher resolution the better. You can use focus assist if your camera has it, which adds a highlight colour to sharp edges. ...


1

I haven't yet handled the A7s mkIII or A7 mkIII, but I'm familiar and own the A7s and A7r line, and before that shot for years on Canon 5D mkIIs. First, video cameras are not DSLRs, and DSLRs really aren't video cameras. Canon's landmark 5D mkI Camera was a game changer for people, creatives, working or aspiring to work in film on a "creative" level. The ...


1

It looks like by default, that camera fine-tunes the focus (even in manual focus). From the Canon support page: To deactivate automatic focus fine-tuning when the shutter button is pressed halfway, choose -> [ ] tab -> [Safety MF] ->[Off].


1

Depends on the type of mount your camera has. This is a good solution for the A7S or A7R and was recently shown at NAB: The Aputure DEC. They also have one for MFT. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?ci=23192&N=3989452947&mnp=0&mxp=1000 And this should be available soon! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1608311032/lenzhound-wireless-lens-...


1

Well, your calculations appear to be correct, but the only calculation that isn't exactly known is the pixel size of your camera sensor. Either your calculation of the camera's pixel size on the sensor (at least when filming 1080 video) is off, or their recorded circle of confusion of that sensor is off. Or both. Though I find it more likely that their ...


1

The problem is that cheap lenses (and even some expensive ones) do not know where the focus ring is actually positioned. They only know if they are in focus and which way to run the motor to get more in focus. For focusing, they don't generally need access to this kind of information because they get feedback via the AF sensor about if they need to keep ...


1

I agree auto focus can mess with your capture especially when there is low contrast at the point of interest. In this situation with auto focus engaged, the focus tends to oscillate. I generally do the following: 1) compose frame of shot. 2) set to auto-focus and zoom in on point of interest until auto focus is stable. 3) once this is stable, I then ...


1

You could check focus before you start recording and use a narrow aperture so that everything stays in focus.


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